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Archaeology
of a
San Francisco Neighborhood

This Web site was funded by the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans).

It was created by Anthropological Studies Center (ASC).

O'Neil Family

 

Double-click to view larger imageIn 1860, Thomas O'Neil and his young family purchased 3 Maria St. in the South of Market area. O'Neil and his wife, both immigrants from Ireland, had lived in California since the 1850s. He was a glass cutter who worked for one of San Francisco's earliest glass cutting businesses, supplying windows to the rapidly expanding city. By 1867 he had begun his own glass cutting firm. He must have met with some success as by 1870 his property holdings were worth $10,000, making him one of the better-off people living on his block. O'Neil continued to live on Maria St. with his wife and four children until at least 1878.

O'Neil lived in an area of the South of Market that had been settled in theMedicinal bottles used by the O'Neil family 1850s, mostly by Irish and German laborers who wanted to be close to their work at Gordon's Sugar Refinery across Eighth St. People like the O'Neils, who purchased their land early, found that it became a considerable asset as the growing industry and encroaching city began to drive up property values. Those who came later and could only afford to rent found it more difficult to get ahead.

Alcohol bottles & smoking pipes from the  O'Neil  privyBehind the O'Neils' house on 3 Maria St. archaeologists found an abandoned privy. It contained artifacts probably discarded by the O'Neils between 1868 and 1878 when they left the address. Refuse from a possible remodeling project including door knobs, drawer pulls, window glass and plaster, and pieces of outdated, cheaper tablewares suggest that the O'Neils, comfortable in their growing affluence, invested money in modernizing their house and possessions.

 


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