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Archaeology
of a
San Francisco Neighborhood

This Web site was funded by the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans).

It was created by Anthropological Studies Center (ASC).

The Neighborhood Through Time

Building a Working Class Community

 

William Ralston. Courtesy of San Francisco History Center, San Francisco Public LibraryIndustry was quick to move into the South of Market area, including George Gordon’s San Francisco and Pacific Sugar Refinery on Eighth and Harrison streets and William Ralston's Kimball Carriage and Car Manufacturing Company.

By the 1880s, men in the South of Market could find work at furniture factories, blacksmiths, and supply yards selling coal, wood, feed, and lumber. Small manufacturing included a cooperage, pickle factory, matzo factory, chemical laboratory, photo plate factory, cream of tartar works, mattress factory, flourmills, pasta makers, and Miner's Foundry and Selby Shot Tower in South of Market, 1867. Courtesy of San Francisco History Center, San Francisco Public Librarywinery.

The majority of people who lived and worked in the South of Market were Irish immigrants or their American-born children. The South of Market landscape was shaped by its industrial and working class character. While smoke stacks and factories punctuated the sky line, nearly every street intersection had its corner grocery store, liquor store, or saloon. Saloons, whose proprietors were almost always German, gave South of Market in April 1906, before the big 1906 earthquake. Courtesy of San Francisco History Center, San Francisco Public Libraryworkingmen a temporary escape from crowded houses and tenements.

 

 

 


 

 

 


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