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Education

School Office
Stevenson Hall 3004
707 664-3115/2132
www.sonoma.edu/education

Credentials Office
Stevenson Hall 3007, 707 664-2581

Teacher Recruitment and Information Center (TRIC)
Stevenson Hall 3011
707 664-2131

Undergraduate Integrated Degree & Credential Programs / Master of Arts in Education / Crosscultural Language and Academic Development Certificate Program (GRAD CLAD) / Individual Course Descriptions

Departments and Programs

Detailed program information can be found in the departments which are listed in alphabetical order following this section.

Curriculum Studies and Secondary Education Department
Single Subject Credential (EDSS courses)
Integrated Programs in English, Kinesiology, Music and Mathematics
Master of Arts in Education: Curriculum, Teaching, and Learning (EDCT courses)

Early Childhood and Elementary Education Department
Multiple Subject Credential, CLAD and Early Childhood (EDMS courses)
Master of Arts in Education: Early Childhood Education (EDEC courses)

Educational Leadership and Special Education Department
Specialist Credential (Special Education), Mild/Moderate; Moderate/Severe
Levels I and II, Intern (EDSP courses)
Administrative Services Credentials, Levels I and II, Intern (EDEL courses)
Master of Arts in Special Education (EDSP courses)

Reading, Language, and Culture Department
BCLAD (Bilingual Spanish) Multiple Subject Credential (EDMS -B courses)
Reading Certificate (EDRL courses)
Reading Specialist Credential (EDRL courses)
Master of Arts in Reading and Language (EDRL courses)
Master of Arts in Educational Leadership (EDEL courses)

Teaching Credential Subject Matter Preparation ? Elementary Programs
American Multicultural Studies
Environmental Studies
Liberal Studies (Hutchins)
Chicano and Latino Studies
Ukiah Liberal Studies

Teaching Credential Subject Matter Preparation? Secondary Programs
Art
English
Mathematics
Music
Physical EducationAdapted Physical Education
Science
Spanish
Social Sciences

Other subject areas through state approved tests.


The Undergraduate Integrated Degree and Credential Programs

The Integrated Degree and Credential Programs offer undergraduate students the opportunity to earn a four year baccalaureate degree and a teaching credential simultaneously. The Hutchins Liberal Studies/School of Education program is a blended program designed for entering freshmen. Students in this program must receive advising about course sequence prior to, or very early in, their freshman year; enroll in an average of 15-18 units per semester; and be willing to take courses in at least one summer session. These undergraduate integrated degree programs are currently available for majors in American Multicultural Studies (AMCS), Chicano and Latino Studies (CALS), and Hutchins Liberal Studies, leading to the Multiple Subject Credential. For Secondary Education, integrated programs are available for majors in English, Mathematics, Music, and Kinesiology leading to the Single Subject Credential. For more information contact the Integrated Credential Program advisor in the appropriate department and the Teacher Recruitment and Information Center in the School of Education.

General Information

In all School of Education programs students are expected to meet and maintain high academic and performance standards, including all of the following (additional standards may be required by specific programs):
  • Maintenance of a 3.0 GPA in all professional education courses
  • Successful completion of required field experiences
  • Successful presentation of a program portfolio prior to advancement to the final phase of the program and/or completion of the final field experience.

The CLAD Credential authorizes the teaching of students at various stages of English language development and from a variety of cultural backgrounds. The CLAD Credential programs focus on the knowledge and skills needed to work successfully with all students in California's multicultural schools. CLAD is the acronym for Crosscultural, Language, and Academic Development.

Individuals interested in teaching at the elementary school level should choose one of the following program emphases: Multiple Subject Credential CLAD, Multiple Subject Credential CLAD Early Childhood Education, or Multiple Subject Credential BCLAD. All three of these program emphases lead to a credential that authorizes the holder to teach in a self-contained classroom, kindergarten through grade 12.

The Single Subject CLAD Credential authorizes the holder to teach a particular subject in a school organized by academic disciplines, kindergarten through grade 12. Since most elementary schools are not departmentalized, this credential, in general, is appropriate for the middle school and high school teacher candidate (art, music, and physical education candidates may actually teach K-12).

The Education Specialist (special education) Credentials, Level I and Level II are offered for Mild/Moderate and Moderate/Severe disabilities, and authorize the holder to provide services in K-12 special day classes (SDC) or resource specialist program classes (RSP).

Individuals possessing a basic teaching credential may enter programs leading to specialist or service credentials. These advanced credentials authorize the holder to perform specialized roles in public schools.

M.A. in education programs are designed with both full-time and part-time students in mind. Some master?s degree programs may be taken concurrently with advanced credential programs.

Note: Program requirements change periodically, and current information may not be available in this catalog. For more detailed information on credentials and other education programs, please see the University?s special bulletins and the School of Education?s current program brochures and policy statements, or visit the Education web site, www/sonoma.edu/education.

Special Resources

Teacher Recruitment and Information Center (TRIC)The Teacher Recruitment and Information Center is available to provide information and admissions applications for all School of Education programs.

TRIC is open daily for student drop-in or telephone requests. For advising about programs, applications, and options, consult the TRIC office in Stevenson Hall, 3011, 707 664-2131.

Credentials Office

The Credentials Office serves as the admissions and records center for all programs offered in the School of Education and is responsible for the recommendation of teaching and service credentials. Credentials analysts and staff are available for providing application information and credential information to prospective students, continuing students, out of state teachers/administrators, university constituents, and the university service area in general.

Career Outlook

California faces the daunting task of replacing 300,000 teachers over the next ten years. Newly credentialed teachers are generally finding jobs rather rapidly today, with equally good prospects for the future. Currently there exist shortages of credentialed teachers in mathematics, science, special education, Spanish, and bilingual education. Due to recent 9th grade class size reductions, English teachers are beginning to be in short supply. In addition, graduates of the School of Education find positions in community agencies and in the private sector.

Project PITA Preservice Inservice Training Alliance

Project PITA Preservice Inservice Training Alliance is a comprehensive support program for new or emergency credentialed teachers and for teachers seeking CLAD or BCLAD certification.

The Project consists of two programs: The preservice program requires that a currently employed teacher (most likely with an emergency credential) be enrolled in a Sonoma State University teaching credential program. Project PITA Preservice Inservice Training Alliance will pay up to full tuition fees for teachers meeting this requirement. Additionally, the project will provide training for PITA Preservice Inservice Training Alliance teachers, cooperating teachers, school administrators and university supervisors. The project?s goal is to ensure its participants will receive excellent training and support. The inservice program requires that a currently employed teacher be interested in obtaining CLAD or BCLAD certification. The project offers assistance with fees for CLAD/BCLAD training, including materials and examination costs. Project PITA Preservice Inservice Training Alliance participants will have access to CLAD/BCLAD training offered by the Bilingual Teacher Training Program administered by the Sonoma County Office of Education. This is one of the most successful training programs in the state. PROJECT PITA PRESERVICE INSERVICE TRAINING ALLIANCE OFFERS:

  • Scholarships
  • Professional growth opportunities
  • Funding for substitute teachers to facilitate release time for Project participants
  • A community of fellow teachers, administrators and School of Education faculty
  • Resources for test preparation and test taking

Project BECA Bilingual Educator Career Advancement

Project BECA Bilingual Educator Career Advancement is an extensive support program for bilingual teacher candidates. This project has been established through a U.S. Department of Education Title VII grant in order to help meet the demand for bilingual teachers in the North Coast. Spearheaded by the School of Education at Sonoma State University and the Sonoma County Office of Education, Project BECA Bilingual Educator Career Advancement proposes to increase the quality and quantity of bilingual teachers through a comprehensive support system.

Project BECA?s main objective is to increase the quality and quantity of bilingual teachers. In order to ensure the success of BCLAD teacher candidates, Project BECA Bilingual Educator Career Advancement offers academic, financial and professional support.

BECA BILINGUAL EDUCATOR CAREER ADVANCEMENT SCHOLARS ARE ELIGIBLE TO RECEIVE:

  • Foreign Transcript Evaluation
  • Assistance with Course Work
  • Tuition Assistance
  • Stipends
  • Child Care Stipends
  • Test Preparation Assistance (BCLAD, CLAD, MSAT, CBEST)
  • Spanish Language Development

Contact Information
Project BECA/PITA
Stevenson Hall 3021
(707) 664-4428

Basic Teaching Credential Programs

Basic teaching credentials include Multiple Subject CLAD (Cross- Cultural Language and Academic Development), BCLAD, and Early Childhood CLAD, Single Subject CLAD, and Education Specialist Level I Credentials. The basic authorization to teach in the California public schools requires all the following:
  1. Possession of a bachelor?s degree.
  2. Verification of appropriate subject matter competency, either completion of an approved subject matter preparation program or passage of appropriate state-approved examination(s).
  3. Passing scores on the California Basic Education Skills Test for Teachers (CBEST).
  4. Completion of a college-level course or college-level examination that covers the U.S. Constitution. POLS 200 or 202 at SSU will meet the requirement.
  5. Completion of a state-approved program of professional teacher education.
  6. Filing of the application for a Certificate of Clearance, which includes fingerprinting.

Completion of the requirements listed above will allow an individual to obtain a preliminary basic teaching credential. A professional clear teaching credential will be recommended by the university upon completion of an approved fifth year of study (30 units beyond the bachelor?s degree) that includes requirements in health education/drug abuse, mainstreaming, computer education, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).

Note: Students should consult with the TRIC office during their first semester on campus if they plan to pursue a teaching credential. Students admitted to a credential program should contact the Credentials Office for any changes in requirements.

California State University Requirements for Admission to Basic Teaching Credential Preparation Programs

All credential candidates must complete the following before admission to the professional preparation programs:
  • Admission to the University.
  • Grade point average of 2.75 in upper division and/or graduate coursework or a 2.67 overall grade point average.
  • Submission of scores for California Basic Educational Skills Test (CBEST).
  • Two letters of recommendation.
  • Successful completion of an admissions interview.
  • Demonstration of aptitude, personality, and character traits that satisfy the standards of the teaching profession. Assessment of these qualities will be made by the School of Education through evaluation of interviews, letters of recommendation, and candidates? professional goals statements, and spontaneous writing sample.
  • Evidence of 45 hours of experience working with school age children.

Some students may be admitted to basic teaching credential programs who have not met one or more of the above requirements when such students have compensating strengths in other required areas.

Note: Additional program-specific admission requirements are listed with each program description.

Procedures for Admission to Basic Teaching Credential Preparation Programs

The Teacher Recruitment and Information Center office provides information regarding admissions requirements and dates for application to programs in the School of Education.
    Obtain application packets and additional information from the TRIC office, Stevenson 3011, or on the website, www.sonoma.edu/education. Submit to the Credentials office, Stevenson 3007 a complete application packet containing the following:
    • One transcript to the School of Education in addition to the two official transcripts from each college/university attended for the Office of Admissions and Records, required for admission to the University.
    • Two letters of recommendation
    • Official CBEST results or evidence of having taken the exam
    • Professional goals statement

Continuation in Basic Teaching Credential Preparation Programs

  1. During the first semester, all candidates must:
    1. Provide evidence from a physician of a clear chest x-ray or negative TB skin test; and
    2. Apply for a Certificate of Clearance. Application forms are available in the Credentials Office.
  2. All education students are required to meet each semester with an education advisor.
  3. Students must successfully complete all requirements for each program phase?including coursework, practica, and student teaching?before entering the subsequent phase.
  4. Students are expected to make continuous progress toward the credential while maintaining a grade point average of 3.00 in professional education courses after entry into the credential program. Incomplete grades (I) and grades of D or F in professional education courses must be removed and statutory requirements met prior to continuing enrollment in courses.
  5. Candidates who must delay progress in the professional education program may file a written request with the program coordinator for an extended program or for a leave of absence. A student returning from a program delay will be subject to the screening requirements in effect at the time of reentry and will be accommodated as space allows. Any student on academic probation is subject to automatic disqualification as a credential candidate.

Fifth-Year Programs

A fifth year of study is currently required to obtain a Professional Clear Teaching Credential. The fifth year is defined as 30 semester units after the bachelor?s degree in an approved program of study that includes approved courses in special education, health education, computer education, and CPR. Candidates must consult with the fifth-year advisor to plan a program most suited to their prior experience and individual professional goals.

Prerequisites for Admission to Fifth-Year Programs

All candidates must complete the following before admission to a fifth- year program:
  1. Admission to the University as a graduate student; and
  2. Submission to the Credentials office of two photocopies of a valid teaching credential, and two official transcripts from each college/university attended.

Program Guidelines


1. Thirty post baccalaureate semester units are required for a Professional Clear Teaching Credential.
2. Courses to be applied to the program must receive prior written approval from the fifth-year advisor.
3. Approved special education, health education, and computer education courses must be completed for a Professional Clear Credential; these units are included in the 30 postbaccalaureate-unit program when completed after award of the bachelor?s degree. The courses are:
EDUC 430 Special Education for Teachers (4)
NURS 473 Health Education and Drug Abuse (3)
EDUC 484 Introduction to Multimedia and Web Authoring (3) or
EDUC 404 Computer Uses in Education (2)
4. Certification in CPR is also required for the Professional Clear Credential. Appropriate avenues for meeting this requirement include the following:
  1. An approved health education course that includes CPR. Documentation required: copy of the course description.
  2. CPR training from the American Heart Association. Acceptable CPR training courses are Heartsaver and Healthcare Provider.
  3. CPR training from the American Red Cross. Acceptable training includes community training or adult and infant/child training. Note: Adult only or infant/child only is not acceptable; it must be both. Documentation required: photocopy of both sides of CPR card with valid date. CPR certificates of training must be current at the time of application and recommendation for the credential.

5. A maximum of 3 units of lower-division courses and 6 units of extension courses may be included.
6. A maximum of 9 semester units in courses taken at other institutions of higher education may be included.
7. Except for M.A. degree programs requiring a 3.00 GPA, a minimum grade point average of 2.50 must be maintained, and no grade below a C may be counted.

Acceptable Fifth-Year Program Alternatives

These may include:
  1. The professional preparation for a basic credential.
  2. A master?s degree program.
  3. A specialist or service credential program.
  4. Additional courses in the applicant?s teaching major.
  5. A second approved teaching major.
  6. A second basic teaching credential.
  7. Courses taken at approved colleges and universities that lead toward professional growth and improvement in teaching effectiveness.
  8. Supplementary authorizations for subject area teaching.
For more information, please consult the fifth-year advisor at (707) 664-4203.

Professional Growth Requirements

Teachers who need to fulfill 150 clock hours of professional growth requirements every five years in order to maintain their Professional Clear California Credential will find a variety of appropriate courses offered by the School of Education and throughout the University. Students should contact designated professional growth advisors in district and county offices of education.

Master of Arts in Education

Director of Graduate Studies: John Kornfeld

Description of M.A. in Education Programs

Sonoma State University?s School of Education offers five advanced credential programs and five areas of concentration within the Master of Arts in Education degree. In each of these programs students critically examine educational theories and research through a variety of cultural and theoretical lenses to develop an informed educational vision and innovative pedagogy in a variety of educational settings. Students have the opportunity to collaborate with faculty and colleagues to examine and influence current educational practice through research, project development, and advocacy. We expect graduates to emerge from their work at Sonoma State University as leaders in their field and agents of change.

The five M.A. in Education areas of concentration offered at Sonoma State University are:

  • Curriculum, Teaching, and Learning (see Department of Curriculum Studies and Secondary Education, p. 145)
  • Early Childhood Education (see Department of Early Childhood and Elementary Education, p. 152)
  • Educational Leadership (see Department of Educational Leadership and Special Education, p. 161)
  • Reading and Language (see Department of Reading, Language, and Culture, p. 175)
  • Special Education (see Department of Educational Leadership and Special Education, p. 161)

Throughout their years in an M.A. program, students are required each semester to meet with the graduate advisor in their area of concentration to plan collaboratively their progress in the M.A. program. Students may also confer with other graduate program faculty and the Director of Graduate Studies for advising and guidance in their coursework and professional development. Students must maintain a 3.00 grade point average in all coursework in the approved M.A. program as well as all coursework taken subsequent to admission in conditionally classified standing.

Prerequisites for the M.A. in Education Program

  1. A bachelor?s degree from an accredited institution.
  2. A cumulative upper-division and graduate grade point average of at least 3.00 and a grade point average of at least 3.00 for previous work in education.
  3. A valid basic teaching credential (except in Curriculum, Teaching, and Learning and Early Childhood Education program areas)

Procedures for Applying to the M.A. in Education Program

  1. Apply to the University as a graduate student.
  2. Apply to the School of Education.
  3. Submit the following:
    1. A professional goals statement.
    2. One set of official transcripts.
    3. One photocopy of a valid basic teaching credential (except in CTL and ECE Programs).
    4. Two letters of reference attesting to academic potential and professional promise (except where otherwise noted).

Pathways to Program Completion

The M.A. program of study requires 30-36 semester units of coursework, depending on the M.A. in Education pathway a student selects. There are three pathways to program completion, including the thesis/project, cognate, and individualized examination. We encourage students to become knowledgeable about each of the pathways in order to pursue a program of study that meets their professional goals within their preferred style of learning.

In all three pathways, graduate students take 18 units in the program area of concentration and at least 6 units (EDUC 570 and 571) of M.A. core courses. All M.A. students work with a three-member committee, and most closely with the committee chair, to complete a culminating activity which is presented to the committee in a public forum. In addition to these points in common, there are distinct differences among the three pathways to program completion, as described below.

Thesis/Project

The thesis/project pathway is a 30-unit course of study, including 18 units in the students? program area of concentration and 12 units of core courses (EDUC 570, 571, 598, and 599). In order to prepare for the thesis/project, students must take Education 598 (Developing a Thesis/Project) and 599 (Supervised Study for the Thesis/Project) as their final two courses in the M.A. program.

The thesis is a written product of a systematic study of a significant problem in education. The project is a written document describing a significant undertaking appropriate to education. The thesis/project option requires an extensive write-up, including an in-depth literature review. Students must also present their thesis/project to their three-member committee in a public forum. Examples of a thesis investigation include process/product research, correlational study, action research, ethnographic study, historical study, or theoretical study. Examples of a project include curriculum design, professional development for educators, program design, performance piece, or creative project.

Cognate

The cognate pathway is a 36-unit course of study, including 18 units in the students? program area of concentration, 9 units of core courses (EDUC 570, 571, and 572), and a 9-unit cognate course of study. The cognate course of study is a group of courses which students choose in consultation with a faculty advisor and/or committee chair, and that allows students to examine areas of interest related to their M.A. concentration. In order to work with their three-member committee on the cognate project, students must take Education 572 (Supervised Study for the Cognate Project) as their final course in the M.A. program.

The cognate project (e.g., portfolio, professional article, video, web site, field-based product) is a significant undertaking through which students connect their cognate course of study with the M.A. core courses, program concentration, and/or work in the field. The project may address, for example, implications of the cognate course of study for the classroom, reflections on new teaching practices, response to scholarly research, or educational theory. A written reflection must be included in the project. Students must present the completed project to their three-member committee in a public forum.

Individualized Examination

The individualized examination pathway is a 33-unit course of study, including 18 units in the students? program area of concentration, 9 units of core courses (EDUC 570, 571, and 573), and 6 units of elective courses. For the electives, students, in consultation with their faculty advisor and/or committee chair, choose courses which allow them to examine areas of interest related to the M.A. concentration and to focus on the examination area(s) of study that they have chosen. In order to work with their three-member committee as they prepare for the examination, students must take Education 573 (Supervised Study for the Individualized Examination) as their final course in the M.A. program.

The individualized examination addresses areas of study identified by the student in consultation with the student?s examination committee. The exam is written by the student?s committee (a chair plus two other members) and consists of four questions related to the student?s area(s) of study, including one question submitted in advance to the committee by the student. When the student is ready to take the examination, he/she receives the questions from the chair and has 72 hours to complete the written examination and to return it to the chair. Within two weeks of completing the examination, the student must meet with the committee for an oral examination in which the committee asks follow-up questions for clarification and elaboration.

The Program Portfolio

In order to advance to candidacy, all students must complete a program portfolio and present it to their committee. In most cases, this presentation occurs at the same meeting where the student presents a proposal for the culminating activity. The program portfolio contains artifacts (papers, projects, etc.) produced by the student throughout the M.A. program which demonstrate the student?s proficiency and growth in the areas listed below. The portfolio should be reflective in nature and should show personal, professional, and intellectual growth. It should also demonstrate how the student?s M.A. program has prepared the student to undertake the culminating activity (thesis/project, cognate project, or individual examination).

In the program portfolio, students are expected to demonstrate:

  • Personal, intellectual, and professional growth over the course of the M.A. program
  • Written language proficiency
  • Breadth and depth of knowledge in educational research
  • Breadth and depth of knowledge in the program area of concentration
  • Evidence of planning toward the completion of the culminating activity (thesis/project, cognate project, or individualized examination)

Requirements for Advancement to Candidacy

  1. Completion of M.A. core courses EDUC 570 and 571, and of M.A. area of concentration courses
  2. Presentation and approval of program portfolio
  3. Presentation of culminating activity proposal
  4. Filing of Advancement to Candidacy form with School of Education Director of Graduate Studies

Requirements for the M.A. Degree in Education

M.A. students must complete all requirements as established by the School of Education, the SSU Graduate Studies Council and the University, to include:
1. Completion of an approved program consisting of a minimum of 30 units of upper-division and 500-level courses, as follows:
    a maximum of 12 units of upper division courses 500-level not more than 9 semester units of transfer and/or extension credit filing of an Advancement to Candidacy form that verifies approval of the program portfolio, verifies writing proficiency, and describes the culminating project.

2. Completion and final approval of culminating activity (thesis/project, cognate project, or individualized examination.

All requirements listed above must be completed within seven years (14 semesters) of the initiation of graduate study.

M.A. Core Courses

Two core courses are required for all M.A. in Education program areas of concentration:
EDUC 570 The Reflective Educator (3)
EDUC 571 Research Paradigms in Education (3)

For students pursuing the thesis/project pathway, two other core courses are required:
EDUC 598 Developing a Thesis/Project (3) and
EDUC 599 Supervised Study for Thesis/Project (3)

For students pursuing the cognate pathway, one other core course is required:
EDUC 572 Supervised Study for the Cognate Project (3)

For students pursuing the individualized exam pathway, one other core course is required:
EDUC 573 Supervised Study for the Individualized Examination (3)

None of the M.A. core courses may be taken through Extended Education.

National Board Certification

Sonoma State University?s School of Education offers three courses which provide preparation and support for National Board certification candidates, helping them to develop the technical, analytical, research, and writing skills necessary for successfully obtaining certification.
EDUC 574 Introduction to Classroom Research and National Board Certification (3) Summer
EDUC 575 Seminar in Action Research (3) Fall
EDUC 576 Research, Reflection, and Professional Practice (3) Spring
Teachers who are interested only in National Board certification may enroll just in EDUC 574, 575, and 576. However, those interested in also pursuing a Master of Arts degree in Education may take these courses as part of their M.A. program. The M.A. programs are flexible, so that a student may begin either an M.A. program or National Board preparation, then choose to add the other option.

Combined Master of Arts and National Board Preparation

M.A. Core courses (570, 571, 572) 9
Program concentration 18
NB Preparation cognate (574, 575, 576) 9
Cognate Project: National Board Certification portfolio and reflection  
Total units: 36

Crosscultural Language and Academic Development Certificate Program (GRAD CLAD)

The Grad CLAD authorization program meets requirements of the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing. All 12 units may be applied to an M.A. in Education with an emphasis in either early childhood education or reading and language (each comprising 30 units). The courses approved are:
EDUC 521 Language Development in First and Second Languages (3)
EDUC 530 Teaching to Diversity (3)

And a choice between the following two courses:
EDUC 522 Curriculum and Assessment for First and Second Language Learners (3) (for elementary or secondary teachers) or
EDUC 534 First and Second Language Curriculum in Preschool and Primary (3) (for teachers who specialize in the early ages, 4-8 years old)

And a choice between the following two courses:
EDUC 529 Evaluation and Assessment in Reading and Language Programs (3) (for elementary or secondary teachers) or
EDUC 537 Authentic Assessment in Preschool and Primary Programs (3) (for teachers who specialize in the early ages, 4-8 years old)

In addition to these 12 units, students must provide evidence that they have experience learning a language other than English. The most common way to meet this requirement is to provide evidence of having taken six units of foreign language at the university level. There are many other ways to meet this requirement; check with the Graduate Studies Coordinator or the Credentials Office for more information.

Candidates for the Grad CLAD must be accepted to the University. In addition, applicants must submit the following to the School of Education:
1. Two official transcripts. Grade point average requirements:cumulative upper division/graduate, 3.00; Education, 3.00.
2. Two letters of reference.
3. A copy of their valid California teaching credential.

Undergraduate (EDUC) Courses

150 Prospective Teachers (3)

Focuses on realities of the classroom from the teacher?s point of view. Includes child development, teachers? roles and responsibilities, and the culture of schools in a changing society. Includes an apprenticeship with a teacher. Grade only. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

238 Introduction to Children?s School (1) Spring

An introduction to the theory and practice of early childhood education at the campus child care center. Emphasis is on developmentally appropriate practice as expressed through curriculum and guidance techniques. One hour lecture and two hours of observation/participation in the Children?s School are required for seven weeks.

239 Parent Education Class (2) Spring

The Parent Education Class facilitates value clarification and the objective study of parent/child behavior. Topics include the developmental stages of children, parental expectations and styles, and different techniques for guiding children?s behavior.

250 Teaching in a Changing World (3) / Fall, Spring

This course is designed to provide an introduction to the classroom from teachers? points of view. Areas of content include child and adolescent development, teachers? roles and responsibilities, the culture of schools in a changing society, as well as an apprenticeship with a practicing teacher. Particular emphasis will be on teacher decision making. Institutional changes that could improve teacher and student performance will also be explored. Each student will spend 30 hours observing and participating in an assigned public school classroom. Grade only. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

291 Training Seminar for Tutors (2) Fall, Spring

Open to students who are tutoring on campus or in the community, or who are interested in tutoring privately. Course is nationally certified by the College Reading and Learning Association, National Association for Developmental Educators and American College Personnel Association. Focus is on the profiles of the various tutees and tutors and how their individual and mutual relationships are affected: learning styles and strategies, self-esteem, codependency, assertiveness, perceived locus of control, communication, stress/anxiety, use/misuse of tutoring strategies, diversity, social/family and educational systems. A wide variety of techniques and skills are used and developed by class participants to empower their tutees and to enhance their own effectiveness as a tutor/human being. Cr/NC only. Certificate received upon successful completion of training.

295 Community Involvement Program (1-4) Fall, Spring

CIP involves students in the community, performing such tasks as tutoring, coaching and reading for the blind. Students receive 1 to 4 units, depending on the specific tasks performed. A total of 6 units of CIP credit may be applied toward a degree. Cr/NC only.

328 Teaching to Instructional Objectives (2)

Guidance in lesson preparation, with emphasis on direct delivery, self-evaluation and analysis of presentations. Grade only. Prerequisites: functional Spanish language skills and participation in the mini-corps program, or consent of instructor.

329 The Migrant Experience (2) / Fall

An examination of the migrant plight in our society and educational system through study of the literature and by a direct, active contact with the migrant community. Grade only. Prerequisites: functional Spanish language skills and participation in the mini-corps program, or consent of instructor.

331 Practicum in Child Study (3) / Fall, Spring

An intensive study of the development and learning of young children through observation and participation in exemplary programs. May be applied toward a Child Development Permit. Satisfies field experience prerequisite for admission to Multiple Subject CLAD with Emphasis in Early Childhood Education Credential program. Grade only.

395 Community Involvement Program (1-4) Fall, Spring

CIP involves students in the community, performing such tasks as tutoring, coaching and reading for the blind. Students receive 1 to 4 units, depending on the specific tasks performed. A total of 6 units of CIP credit may be applied toward a degree. Cr/NC only.

404 Computer Uses in Education (2) / Fall, Spring

Survey and practice of computer applications to enhance student learning. Review of current and projected uses of computers and affiliated technologies in education, through an introduction to current research, professional organizations, and a variety of instructional software and hardware. Grade only.

417 School and Society (3) / Fall, Spring

A critical examination of current issues in today?s schools and future directions in education through the perspectives of history, philosophy, sociology, anthropology, and the politics of education. Content includes: trends, movements and issues of the development of our present-day school systems and current educational practice; development of an individual philosophy of education through examination and evaluation of educational philosophies from early Greek through modern/post-modern thought; analysis of American society and its effect on the functioning of schools; the role of explicit and implicit cultural assumptions in educational contexts; and the influence of federal, state and local governing agencies, the knowledge industry and special-interest groups on education. Grade only. Satisfies GE, category D1 (Individual and Society).

418 Learning and Development in Adolescents (3) Fall, Spring

Examination of theories of learning and teaching, social, physical, emotional, and cognitive development, with emphasis on adolescents. Includes the psychological foundations and research-based knowledge about effective secondary/middle school teaching in the areas of planning, implementing and evaluating instruction, motivation, self-esteem, classroom climate, and psychological perspectives on issues of diversity. Grade only.

484 Introduction to Multimedia and Web Authoring (3)

Students learn to use technology to improve teaching and learning in any setting or organization where education and communication are critical. Multimedia authoring and web design using graphics, text, and sound to convey information and ideas is an integral part of the class. These technology tools include HyperStudio, PhotoShop, Netscape, Claris Home Page, HTML, Macintosh computers and scanners. Teaching and learning projects that are innovative and consistent with exemplary instruction practices form the core activities of the class. These projects focus on the development of learning and information modules created with HyperStudio and the design of educational websites. Grade only. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

M.A. Course Descriptions (EDUC courses)

570 The Reflective Educator (3)

The focus of this course is on philosophical, historical, social, and psychological perspectives in education. Students will examine these perspectives while being encouraged to examine and reflect upon their own professional practices in education. Grade only. Prerequisite: admission to M.A. in Education program.

571 Research Paradigms in Education (3)

This course focuses on students as critical consumers of research and includes among its goals the development of skills in the analysis and critique of educational research. The course addresses research and field needs of practicing educators as opposed to the needs of professional researchers, and serves to acquaint students with basic principles and techniques of educational research. It also provides students with an opportunity to integrate knowledge of these principles through analyses of action research projects that may serve as the foundation for the M.A. in Education culminating activity. Grade only.

572 Supervised Study for the Cognate Project (3)

This supervised independent study provides students with guidance in the completion of their cognate project. Under the direction of the committee chair, and in consultation with all committee members, students will complete (1) a project that synthesizes their cognate coursework and connects it to their M.A. Program concentration, and (2) a scholarly reflection which accompanies the project. Following completion of the project, students will participate in a formal presentation of their work to faculty and colleagues. Cr/NC. Prerequisite: advancement to candidacy.

573 Supervised Study for the Individualized Examination (3)

This supervised independent study provides students with guidance in preparing for the individualized examination. Under the direction of the committee chair, and in consultation with all committee members, each student will determine the areas of study to be addressed in the examination, choose relevant readings, and conduct a concentrated study of those areas to prepare for the exam. Following completion of the written exam, students will take an oral exam in which committee members ask follow-up questions to the written responses. Cr/NC. Prerequisite: advancement to candidacy.

574 Introduction to Classroom Research and National Board Certification (3)

This is an introductory course that supports teachers preparing for the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards certification. National Board (NB) certification is available for general and special education teachers of students from preschool through grade 12 in a variety of areas. The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the NB certification process and to begin exploring strategies for action research, self-assessment, and reflection on teaching practice. Specifically, students become familiar with the National Board?s five core propositions, certificate area standards, and assessment measures and procedures required for certification. In addition, students will learn about the application process and potential sources of funding. Students examine exemplary teaching practices and engage in descriptive, analytical, and reflective writing activities. The units from this course can be applied to an M.A. degree in Education at Sonoma State University.

575 Seminar in Action Research (3)

This is the second of three courses that support teachers working toward National Board certification. It is also intended for any student interested in conducting action research in schools and classrooms. Students explore various research methodologies and engage in data collection through observation, videotaping, and examination of artifacts. Using their own classrooms as sites for ongoing action research, students analyze data and share findings through descriptive, analytical, and reflective writing. The units from this course can be applied to an M.A. degree in Education at Sonoma State University.

576 Research, Reflection, and Professional Practice (3)

This course is designed for teachers to enhance their professional practice through research and reflection. Working collaboratively, teachers complete their portfolios required for National Board certification. In preparation for Assessment Center exercises, teachers engage in extensive review of current and historical perspectives on teaching and learning in their certificate areas. The units from this course can be applied to an M.A. degree in Education at Sonoma State University.

598 Developing a Thesis/Project (3)

This course develops students? abilities to carry out a thesis or project and provides basic information for planning and implementing the thesis/project proposal. The main goal is to provide students with knowledge to begin their thesis/project. Grade only. Prerequisite/corequisite: completion of all M.A. coursework (except EDUC 599).

599 Supervised Study for the Thesis/Project (3)

This supervised independent study provides students with guidance in the completion of their thesis/project. Under the direction of the committee chair, and in consultation with all committee members, students will complete the thesis or project that was developed in EDUC 598 (Developing a Thesis/Project). Following completion of the thesis/project, students will participate in a formal presentation of their work to faculty and colleagues. Cr/NC. Prerequisite: advancement to candidacy.


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