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Education: Early Childhood and Elementary Education

Department Office
Stevenson Hall 3004
707 664-3238
fax 707 664-4200
www.sonoma.edu/education

Administrative Coordinator
Leslie Mouton, Department Chair
Richard Rizzo

Faculty
Bill Bruckreis, Johanna Filp, Virginia Lea, Andrea Neves, Patricia Nourot, Richard Rizzo Multiple Subject CLAD Program Ephases / Multiple Subject CLAD Early Childhood Emphasis Program Courses / Master of Arts in Education: Early Childhood Education Concentration / Child Development Permit Program / Early Childhood Individual Course Descriptions / Multiple Subject Course Descriptions / Education Course Descriptions / Graduate Course Descriptions


The goal of the Department of Early Childhood and Elementary Education is to prepare teachers to play a vital role in California public schools. The diversity of our school population in terms of culture, social class, gender, language, and race is a significant focus of our coursework and field experiences.

The University and the school districts within our service area view teacher education as a shared responsibility. The University provides a broad base of information about research and theory necessary for teaching, while school districts provide the classrooms for field experiences and student teaching. Collaboration between university-based teacher educators and school district teachers provides a strong foundation for the programs goal of excellence.

Special Resources

Teacher Recruitment and Information Center (TRIC)
The Teacher Recruitment and Information Center is available to provide information and admissions applications for all School of Education programs.

TRIC is open daily for student drop-in or telephone requests. For advising about programs, applications, and options, consult the TRIC office in Stevenson Hall, 3011, 707 664-2131.

Credentials Office

The Credentials Office serves as the admissions and records center for all programs offered in the School of Education and is responsible for the recommendation of teaching and service credentials. Credentials analysts and staff are available for providing application information and credential information to prospective students, continuing students, out of state teachers/administrators, University constituents and the University service area in general.

Career Outlook

California faces the daunting task of replacing 300,000 teachers over the next ten years. Newly credentialed teachers are generally finding jobs rather rapidly today, with equally good prospects for the future. Currently there exist shortages of credentialed teachers in mathematics, science, special education, Spanish, and bilingual education. In addition, graduates of the School of Education find positions in community agencies and in the private sector.

Programs Offered in the Department of Early Childhood Education and Elementary Education

In conjunction with the Department of Reading, Language and Culture (RLC), the Department of Early Childhood and Elementary Education (ECEE) offers the following credentials: Multiple Subject CLAD, Multiple Subject CLAD Early Childhood Emphasis.

In addition the Department of ECEE offers a masters degree in Early Childhood Education.

Multiple Subject CLAD Teaching Credential Program

This credential authorizes the holder to teach in a self-contained classroom preschool through grade 12. It is most frequently used for teaching in elementary classrooms and early childhood settings.

Students pursuing the Multiple Subject CLAD Credential may select from among the approved teaching credential subject matter preparation programs within the following departments:
Chicano and Latino Studies (CALS)
Nichols Hall 214, 707 664-2369
Environmental Studies
Rachel Carson Hall 18, 707 664-2306
Hutchins School of Liberal Studies
Rachel Carson Hall 44, 707 664-2419
American Multicultural Studies
Nichols Hall 214, 707 664-2486
Liberal Studies, Ukiah Resident Program
Stevenson Hall 2078, 707 664-2029

I. Multiple Subject (CLAD) Program Emphases

The Multiple Subject CLAD/BCLAD/ECE CLAD emphasis areas offer a 12-month program that includes summer school and two academic semesters.
1. Multiple Subject CLAD, Early Childhood Emphasis. The Multiple Subject CLAD/ECE emphasis Education program is designed for prospective elementary school teachers who have a particular interest in developmentally-based education and in teaching the primary grades, K-3. Beginning teachers in this program take courses that focus on child study and development, working with families, and transitions between preschool and kindergarten programs that are not offered in other Multiple Subject CLAD programs. In addition to a Multiple Subject CLAD Credential certifying them to teach grades K-12, beginning teachers in the Multiple Subject CLAD ECE emphasis also receive a California Child Development Permit, certifying them to teach in state-funded preschool programs.
2. Multiple Subject CLAD. The Multiple Subject CLAD emphasis prepares candidates to teach in self-contained classrooms with significant populations of students who are learning English as a second language in grades K-12. This program prepares candidates to provide instruction for language development and subject matter content in English. Because self-contained classes are located primarily in elementary schools, professional coursework and field experiences focus on elementary classrooms.

The basic authorization to teach in the California public schools requires the following:
1. Possession of a bachelor's degree.
2. Verification of appropriate subject matter competency, either an approved subject matter preparation program or passage of appropriate
3. state-approved examination(s).
4. Submission of scores for the California Basic Education Skills Test for teachers (CBEST).
5. Completion of a college-level course or college-level examination that covers the U.S. Constitution. POLS 200 or 202 at SSU will meet the requirement.
6. Completion of a state-approved program of professional teacher education or passing MSAT.
7. Filing of the application for a Certificate of Clearance, which includes fingerprinting.

Completion of the requirements listed above will allow an individual to obtain a preliminary basic teaching credential. A professional clear teaching credential will be recommended by the University upon completion of an approved fifth year of study (30 units beyond the bachelor's degree) that includes requirements in health education/drug abuse, mainstreaming, computer education, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).

Note: Contact the Credentials office for the latest information regarding legislative changes in the basic credential programs. Students should consult with the Credentials office and the program advisor during their first semester on campus if they plan to pursue a credential.

Requirements for Admission to Basic Teaching Credential Preparation Programs

All credential candidates must complete the following before admission to the professional preparation programs:
1. Admission to the University.
2. Grade point average of 2.75 in upper-division and/or graduate coursework or a 2.67 overall grade point average.
3. Submission of scores for California Basic Educational Skills Test (CBEST) by the end of Phase I.
4. A minimum of 40 hours of documented, supervised field experience. (Please see Prerequisite Field Experience Requirement Documentation form for details.)
5. Successful completion of an admissions interview with a member of the School of Education (for Single Subject, an interview and/or professional assessment in the academic department may be required in addition to the School of Education interview).
6. Demonstration of aptitude, personality and character traits that satisfy the standards of the teaching profession. Assessment of these qualities will be made by the School of Education through evaluation of interviews, letters of recommendation and candidates' professional goals statements.

Some students may be admitted to basic teaching credential programs who have not met one or more of the above requirements when such students have compensating strengths in other required areas.

Note: Additional program-specific admission requirements are listed with each program description.

Procedures for Admission to Basic Teaching Credential Preparation Programs

The Credentials office provides information regarding standards and dates for application to programs in the School of Education.
1. Apply for admission directly to the Credentials office, School of Education. Application packets and additional information may be obtained from the Credentials office, Stevenson 3007.
2. Submit to the Credentials office two official transcripts from each college/university attended. (Check with the office of admissions and records regarding additional official transcripts required for admission to the University.)
3. Submit verification of supervised field experience.
4. Submit three letters of recommendation.

Continuation in Basic Teaching Credential Preparation Programs
1. During the first semester, all candidates must:

  1. a. Provide evidence from a physician of a clear chest x-ray or negative TB skin test; and
  2. b. Apply for a Certificate of Clearance. Application forms are available in the Credentials office.
  3. c. Pass MSAT by the end of Phase II.

2. All education students are required to meet each semester with an education advisor.
3. Students must successfully complete all requirements for each program phase, including coursework, fieldwork, and student teaching before entering the subsequent phase.
4. Students are expected to make continuous progress toward the credential while maintaining a grade point average of 3.00 in professional education courses after entry into the credential program. Incomplete grades (I) and grades of D or F in professional education courses must be removed and statutory requirements met prior to continuing enrollment in courses.
5. Candidates who must delay progress in the professional education program may file a written request with the program advisor for an extended program or for a leave of absence. A student returning from a program delay will be subject to the screening requirements in effect at the time of reentry and will be accommodated as space allows. Any student on academic probation is subject to automatic disqualification as a credential candidate.

Prerequisites and Corequisites

Prerequisites and corequisites for Multiple Subject CLAD, Multiple Subject CLAD Early Childhood emphasis*:

Category I
MATH 300 Elementary Number Systems and Applications (4)
EDUC 417 School and Society, or approved alternative (for MS CLAD) (3)
EDUC 420* Child Development in Family, School and Community,or approved alternative (for MS CLAD/ECE) (3)
EDUC 415* Foundations for Multicultural Education (for MS CLAD/ECE) (4)

 Total prerequisite units for MS CLAD  7
 Total prerequisite units for MS CLAD/ECE  11

Mathematics Requirements

The following courses or their equivalents are required. Equivalents must be verified by a mathematics education advisor in the Mathematics Department.
1. MATH 45 or 50 Intermediate Algebra.
2. One 3-unit college-level mathematics course for which Intermediate Algebra is a prerequisite. MATH 150 Geometry is recommended, but any GE mathematics course is acceptable.
3. MATH 300 Elementary Number Systems Applications.
4. EDUC 472 Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School (taken in sequence after admission to the program).

The above courses are sequential; each one must be completed prior to the next. Any exceptions must be approved by the instructor of the course for which the student has not met the prerequisite.

II. Multiple Subject CLAD

Early Childhood Emphasis Program Courses

Phase I


EDMS 431 Child Study and Curriculum Development inPreschool and Kindergarten (3)
EDMS 410 Second Language Pedagogy (4)
EDMS 477A Participant Observation (1) (must be taken in conjunction with EDUC 431)
EDMS 473 Teaching Science in the Elementary School (2)

Phase II


EDMS 437 Integrated Curriculum, Preschool through Elementary (3)
EDMS 462 Teaching Reading/Language Arts in the Elementary School (4)
EDMS 472 Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School (2)
EDMS 477B Participant Observation (2)

Phase III


EDMS 482 Student Teaching and Seminar (12)
 Total units for the program  33

Multiple Subject CLAD Emphasis Program Courses

Phase I


EDMS 460 Learning and Teaching in Elementary School (3)
EDMS 461 Multicultural Education and the Social Sciences (4)
EDMS 410 Second Language Pedagogy (4)

Phase II


EDMS 462 Teaching Reading/Language Arts in the Elementary School (4)
EDMS 472 Teaching Math in the Elementary School (2)
EDMS 473 Teaching Science in the Elementary School (2)
EDMS 476 Participant Observation (3)

Intersession Enhancement Program(specified courses offered during Intersession)

Phase III


EDMS 480 Integrated Curriculum in the Elementary School (3)
EDMS 482 Student Teaching and Seminar (12)
 Total units for the program  37

*may be taken in Phase II

III. Master of Arts in Education with a concentration in Early Childhood Education

The M.A. degree program in education offers courses of graduate study to prepare candidates for specialized teaching and for curriculum and instructional leadership responsibilities in schools. The program, a minimum of 30 units, provides for areas of concentration in educational administration; curriculum, teaching and learning; early childhood education; reading and language; and special education.

Students must maintain a 3.00 grade point average in all coursework in the approved master's degree program.

Refer to the Graduate Degrees section for more information, page 35.

Prerequisites for the M.A. Program

1. A bachelor's degree from an accredited institution.

2. A cumulative upper-division and graduate grade point average of at least 3.00 and a grade point average of at least 3.00 for previous work in education.

Procedures for Applying to the M.A. Program

1. Apply to the University as a graduate student.

2. Apply to the School of Education.

3. Submit the following:

  1. A professional-goals statement.
  2. One set of official transcripts.
  3. One photocopy of a valid basic teaching credential (except where otherwise noted).
  4. Two letters of reference attesting to academic potential and professional promise (except where otherwise noted).

Requirements for Advancement to Candidacy


1. Completion of M.A. core courses EDUC 570 and 571, and of M.A. concentrations.
2. Presentation and approval of program portfolio.
3. Filing of Advancement to Candidacy form with School of Education graduate coordinator.

The Program Portfolio

Throughout their entire M.A. course of study, graduate students work on a reflective program portfolio. The portfolio addresses the following questions: Who am I in the context of the profession of education at this time in my personal and professional history and in the cultural context in which I live and learn? Under what conditions do I feel respected and engaged as a learner? What ideas have shaped and will impact my practice and my beliefs about education? What ideas, issues, and topics interest me as possible areas for in-depth inquiry? Students will construct and review their program portfolios as an ongoing requirement for the graduate core courses. Presentation of the program portfolio is required for advancement to candidacy.

Requirements for the M.A. Degree in Education

Graduate students must complete all requirements as established by the School of Education, the SSU Graduate Studies Council and the University, to include:
1. Completion of an approved program consisting of a minimum of 30 units of upper-division and 500-level courses, as follows:
  1. At least one-half of the units in 500-level courses.
  2. Not more than 9 semester units of transfer and/or extension credit.
  3. Filing of an Advancement to Candidacy form that verifies approval of the program portfolio, verifies writing proficiency, and describes the culminating project.

2. Completion and final approval of EDUC 598 (M.A. Thesis or Project Seminar) and completion and final approval of a 1) thesis, curriculum project, or creative project; 2) Cognate Project; or 3) Individualized Examination.
All requirements listed above must be completed within seven years (14 semesters) of the initiation of graduate study.

Early Childhood Education

The early childhood education concentration is designed to prepare teachers to work in public school, private and community-based programs that serve children from infancy through third grade (age birth to age 8), and to take leadership roles in the field of early childhood education. Required coursework focuses on crosscultural issues in working with families and young children and advanced study of cognitive, language, social, emotional, and moral development. Improvement of classroom curriculum and assessment from infancy through the primary grades is another emphasis of the program. Candidates need not possess a teaching credential; they may prepare for leadership and advocacy positions in a variety of settings; however, a basic course in child development is prerequisite to admission to the program. Details are available from the early childhood education program advisor.

Program Coursework: 30 units

Required Core Courses in Concentration (6 units)


EDEC 505 Action Research in Preschool and Elementary Classrooms (3) and either
EDEC 538 The Development of Language and Thinking, Infancy through Middle Childhood (3) or
EDEC 539 Advanced Seminar in Early Childhood Education: Research on Quality and Design (3)

At least four of the following courses (12):


EDEC 530* Teaching to Diversity (3)
EDEC 531 The Role of Play in Development and Learning (3)
EDEC 532 Social-Moral Development in Childhood (3)
EDEC 534* First and Second Language Curriculum inPreschool and Primary (3)
EDEC 535 Leadership and Advocacy for Children and Families (3)
EDEC 537* Authentic Assessment in Preschool and Primary Programs (3)
EDEC 593 Crosscultural Approaches to Early Childhood Education (3)

Education Core Courses (12 units)


EDUC 570 The Reflective Educator (3)
EDUC 571 Research Paradigms in Education (3)
EDUC 598 Developing a Thesis/Project (3)
EDUC 599 Supervised Research for Thesis/Project (3)
* May be applied to GRAD CLAD authorization

Supporting Coursework

Electives may include coursework in other academic areas. Please consult with a faculty advisor.

Pathways to Program Completion

The M.A. program of study requires 30-36 semester units of coursework, depending on the M.A. in Education pathway a student selects. There are three pathways to program completion, including the thesis/project, cognate, and individualized examination. We encourage students to become knowledgeable about each of the pathways in order to pursue a program of study that meets their professional goals within their preferred style of learning.

In all three pathways, graduate students take 18 units in the program area of concentration and at least 6 units (EDUC 570 and 571) of M.A. core courses. All M.A. students work with a three-member committee, and most closely with the committee chair, to complete a culminating activity which is presented to the committee in a public forum. In addition to these points in common, there are distinct differences among the three pathways to program completion, as described below.

Thesis/Project

The thesis/project pathway is a 30-unit course of study, including 18 units in students' program area of concentration and 12 units of core courses (EDUC 570, 571, 598, and 599). In order to prepare for the thesis/project, students must take Education 598 (Developing a Thesis/Project) and 599 (Supervised Study for the Thesis/Project) as their final two courses in the M.A. program.

The thesis is a written product of a systematic study of a significant problem in education. The project is a written document describing a significant undertaking appropriate to education. The thesis/project option requires an extensive write-up, including an in-depth literature review. Students must also present their thesis/project to their three-member committee in a public forum. Examples of a thesis investigation include process/product research, correlational study, action research, ethnographic study, historical study, or theoretical study. Examples of a project include curriculum design, professional development for educators, program design, performance piece, or creative project.

Cognate

The cognate pathway is a 36-unit course of study, including 18 units in the students' program area of concentration, 9 units of core courses (EDUC 570, 571, and 572), and a 9-unit cognate course of study. The cognate course of study is a group of courses which students choose in consultation with a faculty advisor and/or committee chair, and that allows students to examine areas of interest related to their M.A. concentration. In order to work with their three-member committee on the cognate project, students must take Education 572 (Supervised Study for the Cognate Project) as their final course in the M.A. program.

The cognate project (e.g., portfolio, professional article, video, website, field-based product) is a significant undertaking through which students connect their cognate course of study with the M.A. core courses, program concentration, and/or work in the field. The project may address, for example, implications of the cognate course of study for the classroom, reflections on new teaching practices, response to scholarly research, or educational theory. A written reflection must be included in the project. Students must present the completed project to their three-member committee in a public forum.

Individualized Examination

The individualized examination pathway is a 33-unit course of study, including 18 units in the students' program area of concentration, 9 units of core courses (EDUC 570, 571, and 573), and 6 units of elective courses. For the electives, students, in consultation with their faculty advisor and/or committee chair, choose courses which allow them to examine areas of interest related to the M.A. concentration and to focus on the examination area(s) of study that they have chosen. In order to work with their three-member committee as they prepare for the examination, students must take Education 573 (Supervised Study for the Individualized Examination) as their final course in the M.A. program.

The individualized examination addresses areas of study identified by the student in consultation with the student's examination committee. The exam is written by the student's committee (a chair plus two other members) and consists of four questions related to the student's area(s) of study, including one question submitted in advance to the committee by the student. When the student is ready to take the examination, he/she receives the questions from the chair and has 72 hours to complete the written examination and to return it to the chair. Within two weeks of completing the examination, the student must meet with the committee for an oral examination in which the committee asks follow-up questions for clarification and elaboration.

The Program Portfolio

In order to advance to candidacy, all students must complete a program portfolio and present it to their committee. In most cases, this presentation occurs at the same meeting in which the student presents a proposal for the culminating activity. The program portfolio contains artifacts (papers, projects, etc.) produced by the student throughout the M.A. program which demonstrate the student's proficiency and growth in the areas listed below. The portfolio should be reflective in nature and should show personal, professional, and intellectual growth. It should also demonstrate how the student's M.A. program has prepared the student to undertake the culminating activity (thesis/project, cognate project, or individual examination).

In the program portfolio, students are expected to demonstrate:

  • Personal, intellectual, and professional growth over the course of the MA program
  • Written language proficiency
  • Breadth and depth of knowledge in educational research
  • Breadth and depth of knowledge in the program area of concentration
  • Evidence of planning toward the completion of the culminating activity (thesis/project, cognate project, or individualized examination)

Requirements for Advancement to Candidacy

  • 1. Completion of M.A. core courses EDUC 570 and 571, and of M.A. area of concentration courses
  • 2. Presentation and approval of program portfolio
  • 3. Presentation of culminating activity proposal
  • 4. Filing of Advancement to Candidacy form with School of Education Director of Graduate Studies

    Child Development Permit Programs Regular Child Development

    There are five levels of the Child Development Permit beginning with 12 units of early childhood education coursework and extending through a baccalaureate degree that includes 24 units of early childhood education and 6 units of administration coursework. Please see the coordinator of early childhood education for details on the requirements for each level of the Child Development Permit.

    Term and Renewal

    The Child Development Permit is issued for five years and must be renewed for successive five-year periods upon submission of a completed application and fee, and proof of professional development requirements, to the Commission on Teacher Credentialing described in the Child Development Professional Growth manual.

    Authorization

    A Child Development Permit authorizes the holder to perform service in the care, development, and instruction of children in a child development program. Reference: Title 5, Sections 80105 and 80114

    Professional Development in Early Childhood Education

    Professional development opportunities are available for individuals working in auxiliary roles (aides or assistants) and complementary roles (social work, nutrition, health) in child development centers. Students may enroll in individual courses without participating in a full permit program. For further information, consult the program advisor for early childhood education. Courses for the Permit fall under four categories: Development, Family and Community, Curriculum, and Administration.

    Prerequisites:

    417 School and Society (3)

    A critical examination of current issues in today's schools and future directions in education through the perspectives of history, philosophy, sociology, anthropology, and the politics of education. Content includes: trends, movements and issues of the development of our present-day school systems and current educational practice; development of an individual philosophy of education through examination and evaluation of educational philosophies from early Greek through modern/post-modern thought; analysis of American society and its effect on the functioning of schools; the role of explicit and implicit cultural assumptions in educational contexts; and the influence of federal, state and local governing agencies, the knowledge industry and special-interest groups on education. Grade only. Satisfies GE, category D1 (Individual and Society).

    Early Childhood Courses (EDEC)

    505 Action Research in Preschool and Elementary Classrooms (3) / Alternate years

    Techniques for conducting ethnographic action research in preschool and elementary settings. Theory and research relating to children's construction of friendships and peer group processes are discussed. Special emphasis is placed on inclusion and exclusion in classroom peer cultures. Grade only.

    530 Teaching to Diversity (3) / Spring

    Since most aspects of education are influenced by culture, this course is designed to analyze education as a cultural process. The multicultural nature of today's society in California and the United States makes it imperative for educators to include multiple approaches to teaching and learning. This course reviews theoretical and practical perspectives of cultural diversity, crosscultural contact, and culturally sensitive pedagogy, particularly for limited English proficient students. Grade only. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

    531 The Role of Play in Development and Learning (3) / Alternate years

    Stages of development of play from infancy through adulthood from the perspectives of Piaget, Freud, Erickson, Mead, and Czskizenmihayhli are addressed as well anthropological perspectives on play and culture, play's relationship to learning in academic disciplines such as language and literacy, and logical-mathematical thinking and the arts. Topics include: the effects of technology (television, computers, and video) on children's play, gender development and play, and play as a tool for developmentally and culturally sensitive curriculum and assessment. Grade only. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

    532 Social-Moral Development in Childhood (3) Alternate years

    Theories and research addressing social-moral development in early childhood, including cultural value differences are discussed. Stages of perspectivism, friendship, and moral understanding from infancy through middle childhood are considered as well as research on the development of prosocial behavior through focused curriculum. Theories and research addressing gender identity and gender role socialization, research and theories applicable to resiliency for at-risk children and working with parents to help them understand children's social-moral development are topics included. Grade only. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

    534 First and Second Language Curriculum in Preschool and Primary (3) / Spring

    Students explore the nature and development of developmentally and culturally appropriate practice in schools with diverse populations, including the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in first and second languages. From observations of children's language, play, and projects in a variety of settings, students will explore the socio- and psycholinguistic underpinnings of communicative competence, emerging literacy and conceptual development in both home and second languages. Strategies for linking children's home and school experiences with holistic, interactive, and integrated curriculum will be emphasized as well as a variety of strategies for Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English (SDAIE). Grade only.

    535 Leadership and Advocacy for Children and Families (3) / Alternate years

    A critical examination of current policy issues related to the inclusion of families in schools, including bilingual education, family literacy programs, Head Start and Even Start, and coordinated services for families and children from diverse cultural, linguistic and socioeconomic backgrounds within school settings. Each student will propose and complete a field-based project touching upon one or more of these areas of professional expertise as part of the development of a leadership and advocacy portfolio for the course. Applicable to the Child Development Permit.

    537 Authentic Assessment in Preschool and Primary Programs (3)

    Focus is on child study, clinical interviews, ethnography, portfolio development and other strategies designed to assess young children in both their first and second languages. The integration of curriculum and assessment in classrooms that meet the needs of children and families from diverse cultural, linguistic, and economic background is stressed. Grade only.

    538 The Development of Language and Thinking: Infancy through Middle Childhood (3)

    This course addresses the development of children from birth through middle childhood with emphasis on the relationships between language development and cognitive development. Current research and theories of cognitive, social, and emotional development as related to language development in home and at school and to the development of both first and second languages are studied. The development of oral, written, and spoken languages in school and care settings are highlighted. Major theorists such as Piaget, Erickson, Bruner, Vygotsky, Mead, and others who address the development of children's representational thinking, language, and crosscultural and family influences on development and learning are discussed. Current research on brain development in the first five years of life is also included and discussed from a critical perspective related to practice. Grade only. Prerequisite: permission of instructor or Master of Arts in Education program.

    539 Advanced Seminar in Early Childhood Education: Research on Quality and Design (3) Alternate years

    Critical analysis and evaluation of qualitative and quantitative research in Early Childhood Education, and implications for curriculum in schools and care programs serving children infancy through the primary grades of elementary school are addressed. Research and policy studies addressing quality indicators in programs for young children across all areas of curriculum are included, as well as factors such as the physical environment, schedules, and teachers' professional development. The focus is on integration of research findings and methodologies to improve the quality of programs designed to serve young children and their families. Grade only. Prerequisite: permission of instructor or acceptance to Master of Arts in Education program.

    593 Crosscultural Approaches to Early Childhood Education (3) / Alternate years

    Historical and philosophical perspectives on the care and education of young children from early centuries to the present day, including models from Europe, China, Japan, Africa, and Latin America. Topics include the roles of the child and the teacher, design of curriculum and environments for learning, and approaches to diversity in classrooms and communities. Grade only.

    Multiple Subject Courses (EDMS)

    410 Second Language Pedagogy (4) / Fall, Spring

    With the increasing numbers of children from different linguistic and cultural backgrounds in schools, preparing to teach and foster development of language and literacy among all children in the classroom is a major responsibility. The course reviews first- and second-language acquisition and major second-language teaching methodologies in relation to language development in school settings. The purpose of this course is to help students discover a diversity of approaches, methods, materials, and media they can use to help all students in our culturally and linguistically diverse classrooms become active, engaged, and independent learners. Attention is given to the integrated development of all language skills within the context of the elementary school curriculum. Grade only. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

    415 Foundations for Multicultural Education (4) Fall, Spring

    A critical examination of current issues in today's schools, preschool through high school, and future directions in education through the perspectives of history, philosophy, psychology, sociology, anthropology, and the politics of education. Content includes the trends and issues of contemporary school systems, developmentally and culturally appropriate practices, and examination of educational philosophies. The implications of cultural, racial, linguistic, and gender diversity in the classroom are examined, as well as strategies for respecting individual and family diversity. The course includes an introduction to educational ethnography, and provides a basis for understanding the relationship of educational research on teaching and learning to inclusive practice in classrooms for diverse populations of children. Grade only. This course is a prerequisite to the Multiple Subject CLAD with Emphasis in Early Childhood Education program.

    431 Child Study and Curriculum Development in Preschool and Kindergarten (3) / Fall, Spring

    Classroom observation and participation in preschool and kindergarten settings. Twelve hours per week for seven weeks in each setting. Topics include classroom environment, lesson planning, teaching strategies, discipline, and child study and observation. Grade only. Prerequisite: admission to Multiple Subject CLAD Early Childhood Emphasis Credential program or consent of instructor. Must be taken concurrently with EDUC 477A for Multiple Subject CLAD ECE emphasis students.

    437 Seminar: Integrated Curriculum in Preschool Through Elementary (3) / Fall, Spring

    Design of integrated curriculum for preschool through elementary school classrooms. Focus is on using skills and concepts identified in California Department of Education frameworks of science, mathematics, language arts, history, social science, visual and performing arts; to plan, implement, and evaluate developmentally appropriate curriculum. Grade only. Prerequisite: admission to Multiple Subject CLAD Early Childhood Emphasis or Education Specialist Credential program or consent of instructor.

    460 Learning and Teaching in the Elementary School (3) / Fall, Spring

    Survey of theories of teaching and learning and the social, physical, emotional and cognitive development of students. The course focuses on the application of this knowledge, and includes researched-based strategies and systems for effective teaching, classroom management and discipline, and development of instructional objectives, lesson plans and teaching strategies. Prerequisite: admission to the Multiple Subject CLAD or BCLAD Elementary Credential program. Grade only.

    461 Multicultural Education and the Social Sciences (4) / Fall, Spring

    Examination of cultural, ethnic, racial, linguistic, gender, family structure, and individual diversity in the classroom, and the root causes of current classroom and school problems. The course includes an introduction to educational ethnography, and provides a basis for understanding the relationship of educational research and classroom teaching in terms of culture, teaching, and learning. Alternative methods and materials integrating social studies with other elementary school subjects are examined and evaluated; teacher candidates learn how to develop their own program of study in the social sciences. Students use techniques of ethnographic methods to observe and analyze classrooms during the observational field placement of the class (30 hours) during the last half of the semester. Prerequisite: admission to the Multiple Subject CLAD Elementary or BCLAD Credential program. Grade only.

    462 Teaching Reading/Language Arts in the Elementary School (4) / Fall, Spring

    Principles, methods, and materials for a comprehensive, balanced approach to instruction in reading and language arts. Includes current views of reading theory, current issues in reading/language pedagogy, strategies for literacy instruction. To include information, research-based instructional methodologies consistent with the A-M list of reading skills outlined in the California Reading Initiative, evaluating student progress, and the history of American literacy. Emphasis is on the interrelationships between language systems and the cognitive, affective and social aspects of literacy acquisition and development; issues of cultural and language diversity, bilingualism and dialect variation are integral to the course. Teacher candidates spend a minimum of 30 clock hours in an elementary classroom during reading/language arts instruction; no more than 4-5 hours are completed in one week; includes weekly meetings for discussion and feedback. Prerequisites: admission to a Multiple Subject Elementary Credential program or Special Education program. CLAD/BCLAD students must be concurrently enrolled in EDUC 460 and 461. Grade only. Special education prerequisite: admission to the Education Specialist Credential program.

    472 Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School (2) / Fall, Spring

    Principles, goals, methods, and materials for teaching mathematics in elementary schools. This course aims to increase students' own understanding and appreciation of elementary mathematics; to build their awareness of children's mathematical thinking, learning, development, and diversity; to help them develop effective strategies and techniques for planning, teaching, assessing, and adapting mathematics instruction; and to engage them in reflection on current practices and issues in mathematics education. Grade only. Prerequisite: MATH 300. Open only to students in the Multiple Subject Credential programs.

    473 Teaching Science in the Elementary School (2) Fall, Spring

    Philosophy, goals, and techniques of elementary science teaching. Emphasis is on theories and methods of teaching for conceptual understanding, development of science process skills, and development of positive attitudes toward science and learning. Major concepts of science are reviewed, with emphasis on representing them in ways that are effective with elementary students. Active, hands-on methods of teaching are presented throughout the course. Grade only. Open only to students in the Multiple Subject Credential CLAD programs; students in the Multiple Subject CLAD or BCLAD options must enroll concurrently in EDUC 476. Students in the Multiple Subject CLAD ECE program may take this course after admission to the program.

    476 Participant Observation (3) / Fall, Spring

    Students spend three mornings per week in an elementary classroom for 15 weeks observing, assisting in daily classroom routines and activities, and teaching. Students will be paired with a 482 student teacher. Includes observation and teaching in small and large groups and collaboration with the student teacher in observation and participation. Cr/NC only. Prerequisites: admission to the Multiple Subject CLAD or BCLAD Credential Program.

    477A Participant Observation for Multiple Subject CLAD with Emphasis in Early Childhood Education (1) / Fall, Spring

    Students spend three half days per week in a preschool classroom for 10 weeks assisting in daily classroom routines and activities and teaching. Includes child study and assessment techniques for children ages 4-5 and curriculum planning for early primary (ages 4-6) programs, teaching small and large groups, and organizing learning centers. Prerequisites: admission to Multiple subject CLAD with Emphasis in Early Childhood Education Credential Program. Requires concurrent enrollment in EDUC 431.

    477B Participant Observation for Multiple Subject CLAD with Emphasis in Early Childhood Education (2) / Fall, Spring

    Students spend three half days per week in an elementary school for 15 weeks assisting in daily classroom routines, activities, and teaching in two classrooms: one in kindergarten, and one in grades 3-6. Includes child study and assessment techniques for children ages 4-8 and curriculum planning for early primary (ages 4-6) programs, as well as teaching small and large groups, and organizing curriculum and assessment for upper elementary grade children. Students will collaborate with EDUC 482 student teachers at the site. Prerequisites: admission to Multiple Subject CLAD with Emphasis in Early Childhood Education Credential Program and completion of EDUC 431 and EDUC 477A.

    480 Integrated Curriculum in the Elementary School (3) / Fall, Spring

    Focuses on various ways of organizing discipline-based knowledge that gives elementary students a coherent educational experience. Teacher candidates are encouraged to use lessons, materials, and unit plans written for this class in their concurrent student teaching experience. Grade only. Prerequisites: admission to the Multiple Subject Elementary Credential program; completion of Phase I should be taken in Phase II of program or can be taken in Phase III concurrently with EDUC 482. BCLAD candidates must see their advisor in order to take the BCLAD section.

    482 Student Teaching and Seminar (12) / Fall, Spring

    Students spend five full days per week in an elementary classroom for a full semester. They will be paired with a 476 participant. During the last two weeks of this experience, teacher candidates teach and are responsible for the entire curriculum and school day. Students meet with their supervisors every week. Cr/NC only. Prerequisites: admission to a Multiple Subject CLAD Elementary Credential program; completion of Phase I and Phase II coursework and field experiences, including EDUC 476, Participant Observation.

    Education Courses (EDUC)

    490 Selected Topics in Education (1-4) / Fall, Spring

    A course designed according to the interest of a particular faculty member, providing opportunities for diversification in content and reading. Grade only.

    495 Special Studies (1-4) / Fall, Spring

    Independent study designed in consultation with an instructor. Grade only. Prerequisites: successful completion of at least two courses in the School of Education, and submission of a completed SSU special studies form with required approvals during the first week of classes.

    Graduate Courses

    500 Advanced Selected Topics in Education (1-4) Fall, Spring

    A graduate course designed according to the interest of a particular faculty member, providing opportunities for diversification in content and reading. Grade only.

    570 The Reflective Educator (3) / Fall, Spring

    This is the first in a series of three graduate core courses in the School of Education. Students will take this course at the beginning of the M.A. program. The focus of this course is on philosophical, historical, social, and psychological perspectives in education. Students will examine these perspectives while being encouraged to examine and reflect upon their own professional practices in education. In this course, students will begin to construct a reflective program portfolio that they will continue to modify throughout their M.A. program. The portfolio is intended to be cumulative throughout the graduate core courses. Grade only. Prerequisite: admission to M.A. in education program.

    571 Research Paradigms in Education (3) Fall, Spring

    This is the second in the series of three graduate core courses, and is designed to be taken midway in the master of arts degree program. This course focuses on students as critical consumers of research, and includes among its goals the development of skills in the analysis and critique of educational research. The course addresses research and field needs of practicing educators as opposed to the needs of professional researchers and serves to acquaint students with basic principles and techniques of educational research. It also provides students with an opportunity to integrate knowledge of these principles through analyses of action research projects that may serve as the foundation for the culminating Master of Arts degree project. Grade only. Prerequisite: EDUC 570.

    572 Supervised Study for the Cognate Project (3) Fall, Spring

    This supervised independent study provides students with guidance in the completion of their cognate project. Under the direction of the committee chair, and in consultation with all committee members, students will complete (1) a project that synthesizes their cognate coursework and connects it to their M.A. Program Concentration, and (2) a scholarly reflection which accompanies the project. Following completion of the project, students will participate in a formal presentation of their work to faculty and colleagues. Cr/NC. Prerequisite: advancement to candidacy.

    573 Supervised Study for the Individualized Examination (3) / Fall, Spring

    This supervised independent study provides students with guidance in preparing for the individualized examination. Under the direction of the committee chair, and in consultation with all committee members, each student will determine the areas of study to be addressed in the examination, choose relevant readings, and conduct a concentrated study of those areas to prepare for the exam. Following completion of the written exam, students will take an oral exam in which committee members ask follow-up questions to the written responses. Cr/NC. Prerequisite: advancement to candidacy.

    578 Project Continuation (1-3) / Fall, Spring

    Designed for students working on their thesis or master's project but who have otherwise completed all graduate coursework toward their degree. This course cannot be applied toward the minimum number of units needed for completion of the master's degree. Prerequisite: permission of the graduate coordinator. Cr/NC only.

    595 Special Studies (1-4) / Fall, Spring

    Independent study designed in consultation with an instructor. Grade only. Prerequisite: Students must complete the standard SSU form and secure the required approvals during the first week of classes.

    598 Developing a Thesis/Project (3)

    This is the final course in the graduate core courses in education. This course develops students' abilities to carry out a thesis or project and provides basic information for planning and implementing the Master of Arts degree proposal. The main goal is to provide students with knowledge to begin their thesis or project. Time is provided students to assess progress in the program and to complete portfolio development. Grade only. Prerequisite: completion of all M.A. coursework or taken in final semester of M.A. coursework.

    599 Supervised Research for Thesis/Project (3)

    Supervised Research provides students with guidance in the completion of their research project. Under the direction of the committee chair, and in consultation with all committee members, students will complete the thesis or project that was developed in EDUC 598 Developing a Thesis/Project. Following completion of the research project, students will participate in a formal presentation of their work to faculty and colleagues. Cr/NC. Prerequisite: completion of EDUC 598. Advancement to candidacy approved.


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