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Educational Leadership and Special Education

Department Office
Stevenson Hall 2010
707 664-4203fax 707 664-2483
www.sonoma.edu/education

Administrative Coordinator
Linda McKee

Department Chair
Thomas Cooke

Faculty
Emiliano Ayala, Thomas Cooke, Melanie Dreisbach, Mary Dingle,
Paul Porter, Brian Shears, Robert Vieth

Preliminary Level I Education Specialist Credential Program / Internship Program in Special Education / Professional Level II Education Specialist Credential Program / Master of Arts: Concentration in Special Education Program / Preliminary Administrative Services Credential Program / Professional Administrative Services Credential Program / Internship Program in Educational Administration / Master of Arts: Concentration in Educational Leadership Program / Educational Leadership and Special Education Course Descriptions

The Department of Educational Leadership and Special Education exists to provide state-of-the-art professional preparation for educators in the fields of educational administration and special education. The core values of our department center upon a dedication to educational excellence as a pivotal contributor to social progress. Indices of our notion of excellence include a view of schools as a crucible for an effective democracy, societal inclusivity, respect for differences in students, and an unflinching concentration on educational efficacy.

Our faculty is comprised of teachers, administrators, scholars, researchers, and program developers who possess wide and varied experience. The faculty, having won wide recognition and numerous educational awards and honors, are dedicated to preparing educators with the knowledge, skills and ethical commitment to improve society through powerful and effective schools.

Our credential and M.A. programs, described below, offer a full compliment of course and fieldwork for students to achieve Level I and Level II (known as PASC I and II in the case of Educational Administration) credentialing, as well as Master of Arts degrees. Both traditional and intern programs exist. Courses are scheduled in the late afternoon, evenings, on Saturdays, and delivered online, in order to accommodate practicing educators.

Students in the department of Educational Leadership and Special Education may expect to encounter programs which present cutting-edge information and skills, delivered by an expert, committed faculty, and scheduled for maximum access. Moreover, students can expect to be afforded respect, dignity, and professionally courteous treatment and be asked to provide similar regard to faculty and to one another.

Note: Since some specific program requirements change periodically, both via mandates of the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing and university-based modifications, prospective students are advised to consult the School of Education?s Teacher Recruitment and Information Center (TRIC) for updates on program details and policy statements, and visit the education website at www.sonome.edu/education.

Special Resources

Teacher Recruitment and Information Center (TRIC)The Teacher Recruitment and Information Center is available to provide information and admissions applications for all School of Education programs.

TRIC is open daily for student drop-in or telephone requests. For advising about programs, applications, and options, consult the TRIC office in Stevenson Hall, 3011, 707 664-2131.

Credentials Office

The Credentials Office serves as the admissions and records center for all programs offered in the School of Education and is responsible for the recommendation of teaching and service credentials. Credentials analysts and staff are available for providing application information and credential information to prospective students, continuing students, out of state teachers/administrators, University constituents and the University service area in general.

Career Outlook

California faces the daunting task of replacing 300,000 teachers over the next ten years. Newly credentialed teachers are generally finding jobs rather rapidly today, with equally good prospects for the future. Currently there exist shortages of credentialed teachers in mathematics, science, special education, Spanish, and bilingual education. In addition, graduates of the School of Education find positions in community agencies and in the private sector.

Programs Offered in the Department of Educational Leadership and Special Education

The Education Specialist (special education) Credentials, Level I and Level II are offered for Mild/Moderate and Moderate/Severe disabilities, and authorize the holder to provide services in K-12 special day classes (SDC) or resource specialist program classes (RSP) or other related fields such as inclusion specialists. Many special educators also teach adults with disabilities.

The Administrative Service Credentials, Preliminary Administrative Services (PASC I) and Professional Administrative Services (PASC II) prepare graduates for positions of leadership in K-12 educational institutions.

M.A. in education programs are designed with both full-time and part-time students in mind. Some master?s degree programs may be taken concurrently with advanced credential programs. Note: Program requirements change periodically, and current information may not be available in this catalog. For more detailed information on credentials and other education programs, please see the University?s special bulletins and the School of Education?s current program brochures and policy statements or visit the Education web site www.sonoma.edu/education.

Programs offered

Basic Teaching Credentials

Education Specialist (special education) Levels I and II
Mild/Moderate; and Moderate/Severe Disabilities

Service Credentials

Administrative Services ? Preliminary, Intern and Professional

Master?s Degree (M.A.) Programs Educational Leadership

Special Education (both in conjunction with School of Education M.A. programs)

I. Preliminary Level I Education Specialist Credential in Mild/Moderate or Moderate/Severe Disabilities

A Preliminary Level I Education Specialist Credential Program is offered in the areas of mild/moderate (M/M) disabilities and moderate/severe (M/S) disabilities, authorizing the provision of services to individuals in grades K-12 in special day class (SDC) and resource specialist program (RSP) settings, and adults. The credential in M/M disabilities authorizes the teaching of individuals with specific learning disabilities, mental retardation, other health impairment, and serious emotional disturbance. The credential in M/S disabilities authorizes the teaching of individuals with autism, mental retardation, deaf-blindness, serious emotional disturbance, and multiple disabilities.

A Multiple Subject or Single Subject credential is no longer required as a prerequisite for admission to a credential program in special education. The Preliminary Level I Education Specialist Credential Program in M/M disabilities and in M/S disabilities includes specified coursework in multiple or single subject teacher education for those Education Specialist Credential candidates who do not hold a Multiple Subject or Single Subject credential.

Successful completion of the Preliminary Level I Education Specialist Credential Program in mild/moderate disabilities or in moderate/severe disabilities will allow the candidate to receive a preliminary Certificate of Eligibility, which authorizes the individual to seek initial employment as a special educator. On securing a special education teaching position, the candidate is eligible to receive a Preliminary Level I Credential that is valid for five years. The Preliminary Level I Education Specialist Credential holder must complete Professional Level II preparation in special education within five years of the date of issuance of the Preliminary Level I Credential.

Prerequisites


EDUC 417 School and Society (3) or
LIBS 312 Schools in American Society (3)
EDUC 430 Special Education for Teachers (4)
Total prerequisite units: 7

Multiple/Single Subject Teacher Education Requirements

(Choose one of the following three options):

Multiple Subject ? Early Childhood Option
EDMS 437 Seminar: Integrated Curriculum in Preschool Through Elementary (3)
EDMS 462 Teaching Reading and Language Arts in Elementary School (includes a fieldwork component) (4) Multiple Subject ? Elementary Option
EDMS 462 Teaching Reading and Language Arts in Elementary School (includes a fieldwork component) (4)
MATH 300 Elementary Number Systems and Applications (4) Single Subject ? Secondary Option
EDSS 418 Learning and Development in Adolescents (3)
EDSS 446 Language and Literacy Across the Curriculum: Middle and Secondary Schools (includes a fieldwork component) (4)
Total general teacher education units: 7-8

Special Education Requirements

(Must complete Common Core plus M/M or M/S credential coursework)

Common Core for Education Specialists


EDSP 422 Collaborative Partnerships in Special Education (3)
EDSP 423A Assessment, Curriculum and Instructional Strategies (3)
EDSP 424A Classroom Ecology: Management, Discipline and Behavioral Supports (3)

Credential-Specific Curriculum


Mild/Moderate Disabilities
EDSP 423B Assessment, Curriculum and Instruction: Applied Strategies for Students with M/M (3)
EDSP 424B Classroom Ecology: Social Competence and Applied Problem Solving (3)
EDSP 425 Developing Academic Performance of Students with M/M Disabilities (3)
EDSP 465 Student Teaching Practicum M/M (10)
EDSP 466 Student Teaching Seminar M/M (1)
Moderate/Severe Disabilities
EDUC 423C Assessment, Curriculum, and Instruction: Applied Strategies for Students with M/S (3)
EDUC 424C Positive Behavioral Supports and Instructional Models (3)
EDUC 428 Pro Seminar: Topics in the Education of Students with M/S Disabilities (3)
EDUC 467 Student Teaching Practicum M/S (10)
EDUC 468 Student Teaching Seminar M/S (1)
Total Level I Special Education units 29
Total units for the Preliminary Level I Education Specialist Credential in Mild/Moderate or
Moderate/Severe Disabilities 44-45

Level I Portfolio

All Level I Education Specialist credential students are required to develop and maintain a Professional Portfolio in the Level I program. This portfolio is based on the California Standards for the Teaching Profession, and will include professional writing samples and a record of the students? reflections on the impact of their study on their educational practice.

Basic Authorization to Teach in the California Public Schools

The basic authorization to teach in the California public schools requires all the following:
1. Possession of a bachelor?s degree.
2. Verification of appropriate subject matter competency, either completion of an approved subject matter preparation program or passage of appropriate state-approved examination(s).
3. Passing scores on the California Basic Education Skills Test for Teachers (CBEST).
4. Completion of a college-level course or college-level examination that covers the U.S. Constitution. POLS 200 or 202 at SSU will meet the requirement.
5. Completion of a state-approved program of professional teacher education.
6. Filing of the application for a Certificate of Clearance, which includes fingerprinting.

Completion of the requirements listed above will allow an individual to obtain a preliminary basic teaching credential. A professional clear teaching credential will be recommended by the University upon completion of an approved fifth year of study (30 units beyond the bachelor?s degree) that includes requirements in health education/drug abuse, mainstreaming, computer education, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).

Note: Students should consult with the TRIC office during their first semester on campus if they plan to pursue a teaching credential. Contact the Credentials Office for any changes in credential requirements.

Requirements for Admission to Basic Teaching Credential Preparation Programs

All credential candidates must complete the following before admission to the professional preparation programs:
1. Admission to the University.
2. Grade point average of 2.75 in upper division and/or graduate coursework or a 2.67 overall grade point average.
3. Submission of scores for California Basic Educational Skills Test (CBEST).
4. Two letters of recommendation.
5. Successful completion of an admissions interview.
6. Demonstration of aptitude, personality, and character traits that satisfy the standards of the teaching profession. Assessment of these qualities will be made by the School of Education through evaluation of interviews, letters of recommendation, and candidates? professional goals statements, and spontaneous writing sample.

Some students may be admitted to basic teaching credential programs who have not met one or more of the above requirements when such students have compensating strengths in other required areas.

Note: Additional program-specific admission requirements are listed with each program description.

Procedures for Admission to Basic Teaching Credential Preparation Programs

The Teacher Recruitment and Information Center office provides information regarding admissions requirements and dates for application to programs in the School of Education.
1. Obtain application packets and additional information from the TRIC office, Stevenson 3011, or from the web site, www.sonoma.edu/education.
2. Submit to the Credentials office, Stevenson 3007, a complete application packet containing the following:
  • Two official transcripts from each college/university attended (Check with the Office of Admissions and Records regarding additional official transcripts required for admission to the university.)
  • Two letters of recommendation
  • Official CBEST results or evidence of having taken the exam
  • Professional goals statement

Continuation in Basic Teaching Credential Preparation Programs


1. During the first semester, all candidates must:
  1. Provide evidence from a physician of a clear chest x-ray or negative TB skin test; and
  2. Apply for a Certificate of Clearance. Application forms are available in the Credentials office.

2. All education students are required to meet each semester with an education advisor.
3. Students must successfully complete all requirements for each program phase? including coursework, practica, and student teaching ? before entering the subsequent phase.
4. Students are expected to make continuous progress toward the credential while maintaining a grade point average of 3.00 in professional education courses after entry into the credential program. Incomplete grades (I) and grades of D or F in professional education courses must be removed and statutory requirements met prior to continuing enrollment in courses.
5. Candidates who must delay progress in the professional education program may file a written request with the program coordinator for an extended program or for a leave of absence. A student returning from a program delay will be subject to the screening requirements in effect at the time of reentry and will be accommodated as space allows. Any student on academic probation is subject to automatic disqualification as a credential candidate.

The Integrated Degree and Credential Program

The Integrated Degree and Credential Program is an opportunity to earn a four-year baccalaureate degree and a teaching credential simultaneously. Students in this program must receive advising about course sequence prior to, or very early in, their freshman year; enroll in an average of 15-18 units per semester; and be willing to take courses in at least one summer session. Most majors will earn a four-year degree and a teaching credential in four years plus one additional semester. This program is currently available for majors in Chicano and Latino Studies (CALS) Multiple Subject Credential; and English, Mathematics, and Kinesiology Single Subject Credentials. For more information contact the Integrated Credential Program advisor in the appropriate department.

Special Education Credentials

The California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC) adopted a two-level credential structure to respond to the changing needs in the field of special education. Candidates interested in obtaining a special education teaching credential must complete both the Preliminary Level I and the Professional Level II Education Specialist Credential programs. The School of Education offers both levels of the Education Specialist Credentials in Mild/Moderate Disabilities and in Moderate/Severe Disabilities.

II. Internship Program in Special Education

The Education Specialist Internship Program in either M/M or M/S Disabilities allows public and nonpublic school special education teachers who do not hold the Preliminary Education Specialist Credential to complete a credential preparation program of study while employed as special education teachers and with supervision and mentoring support for the internship assignment. Further information may be obtained from the Teacher Recruitment Information Center or from the Intern Advisor, Dr. Mary Dingle.

Admission into the Education Specialist Internship Program at Sonoma State University is built upon communication and collaboration between the university and the participating school district. The university will work with the districts in an effort to recruit, identify, and admit appropriate candidates for the internship program. To be eligible to participate in an internship program, each candidate must have:

  • Earned a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university
  • Passed the basic skills proficiency test (CBEST)
  • Passed a subject matter knowledge exam or a program of subject matter study
  • Completed character and identification clearance (fingerprints)
  • Demonstrated knowledge of the U.S. Constitution
  • Obtained an Intern Credential
An application to the Sonoma State University Education Specialist Internship Program must be completed by each internship program applicant. As part of the process, applicants are required to submit:
  • University application and application fee
  • School of Education program application
  • Verification of passage of CBEST
  • One official transcript from all accredited colleges and universities attended
  • (Admission requires a GPA commensurate with California State University requirements as outlined in Executive Order 547.)
  • A letter of recommendation from the employing district based, where possible, on teaching evaluations or those used in the employment process, for newly hired candidates
  • Verification of subject matter competence
  • Photocopy of Intern Credential

Intern applicants should also be aware of the following, outlined in the Region 1 Consortium Alternative Certification Proposal:

Successful candidates must demonstrate to the University and the employing school district that they have had a variety of prior successful experiences with children and/or adolescents, such as teaching, tutoring, coaching, camp-counseling and so forth. They will also participate in a formal interview with university personnel, which will be used to assess their readiness to assume classroom responsibilities after appropriate pre-service instruction, and their attitudes toward schooling and children.

Candidates will also submit a two-page summary of relevant experiences that have led them to teaching. They will be asked to submit written letters of recommendation from people who are able to comment on their character, work experience, and potential as classroom teachers.

III. Professional Level II Education Specialist Credential in Mild/Moderate or Moderate/Severe Disabilities

A Professional Level II Education Specialist Credential program is offered in the areas of mild/moderate (M/M) and moderate/severe (M/S) disabilities. Following receipt of the Preliminary Level I Education Specialist Credential, all candidates must complete Professional Level II preparation in special education within five years of issuance of the Preliminary Level I Credential. A major focus of the Professional Level II program is to provide a mechanism for the successful induction of a new professional. The emphasis of the professional development program is to move the special educator beyond the functional aspects of teaching to more advanced knowledge and reflective thinking about his or her role in providing effective instruction and an environment for student success.

As soon as possible, but no later than 120 calendar days of service with the Preliminary Level I Education Specialist Credential, the beginning teacher, employer, and member of the SSU School of Education faculty in the program area of special education collaboratively design a Professional Induction Plan. The Level II induction plan addresses on each beginning teacher?s assessed needs and outlines specific goals and activities for facilitating professional development. The candidate must enroll in an approved program for the Professional Level II Education

Specialist Credential before the induction plan is completed.

To be eligible for the Professional Level II Education Specialist Credential, the candidate must complete a period of induction for at least one full year with a field mentor (support provider) identified by the employer; must verify successful completion of two years of teaching experience in a full-time special education position or the equivalent, in a public school or private school of equivalent status, while holding a Preliminary Level I Education Specialist Credential; must enroll in and successfully complete the Professional Level II program; and, must be recommended for the Professional Level II Education Specialist Credential by the Institution of Higher Education.

Prerequisites


1. Valid Preliminary Level I Education Specialist Credential in Mild/Moderate or Moderate/Severe Disabilities
2. Teaching position in special education in a public school or private school of equivalent status

Required Professional Level II courses


EDSP 511 Professional Induction Plan: Supervised Development (1)
EDSP 512 Advanced Issues in Assessment, Curriculum, and Instruction of Students with Disabilities (3)
EDSP 513 Current and Emerging Research and Practice in Special Education (3)
EDSP 514 Advanced Communication, Collaboration, and Consultation in Special Education (3)
EDSP 515 Advanced Legal Issues in Special Education (3)
EDSP 516 Professional Induction Plan: Culminating Assessment (1)
Total Special Education units for Professional Level II :14

California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC) Statutory Requirements for Level II are:
EDUC 404 Computer Uses in Education (2) or
EDUC 484 Introduction to Multimedia and Web Authoring (or equivalent) (3)
NURS 473 Health Education and Drug Abuse (or equivalent) (3)
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) Training

Non-University Activities

Non-University Based Professional Development Activities approved by the Special Education Program Coordinator and the candidate?s field mentor may be substituted for 3 units of University coursework.

Level II Portfolio

All Level II Education Specialist credential students are required to develop and maintain a Professional Portfolio in the Level II program. This portfolio is a continuation of the Preliminary Level I Program Portfolio that is based on the California Standards for the Teaching Profession. Although the focus of each portfolio is different, there is some overlap, given they both include professional writing samples and a record of the students? professional reflections on the impact of their graduate study on their educational practice. Level II students, therefore, will include entries from their M.A. Portfolio in their Level II Portfolio.

Candidates outside the Level II program will review the portfolio requirements with their M.A. advisor to determine the purpose and focus of their M.A portfolio.

IV. Master of Arts with a concentration in Special Education

The Master of Arts in Education (M.A.) with a concentration in Special Education provides advanced academic study for persons working with or on behalf of individuals with disabilities. Candidates who possess a valid Preliminary Level I Education Specialist Credential in Mild/Moderate or Moderate/Severe Disabilities may combine their master?s degree studies with coursework from their Professional Level II Education Specialist Credential program preparation. Candidates from related disciplines may pursue this advanced degree with consent from the Department of Educational Leadership and Special Education.

Candidates must apply and be admitted both to the University and to the M.A. in Education-Special Education Concentration program in order to pursue this degree. The course of study (described below) includes the M.A core curriculum (9-12 units), Special Education Level II coursework (9-12 units) and relevant elective coursework (units vary). Candidates will select one of the following pathway options for completing their M.A. course of study:


Thesis/Project option (30 units)
Cognate option (36 units)
Individualized Examination option (33 units)

Procedures for Applying to the M.A. Program


1. Apply to the University as a graduate student.
2. Apply to the School of Education.
3. Submit the following:
  1. A professional-goals statement.
  2. One set of official transcripts.
  3. One photocopy of a valid basic teaching credential (except where otherwise noted).
  4. Two letters of reference attesting to academic potential and professional promise (except where otherwise noted).

Requirements for the M.A. Degree in Education

Graduate students must complete all requirements as established by the School of Education, the SSU graduate studies council, and the University, to include:
1. Completion of an approved program consisting of a minimum of 30 units of upper-division and 500-level courses, as follows:
  1. at least one-half of the units in 500-level courses
  2. not more than 9 semester units of transfer and/or extension credit
  3. filing of an Advancement for Candidacy form that verifies approval of the program portfolio, verifies writing proficiency, and describes the culminating project

2. Completion and final approval of EDUC 572, 573 or 598 and completion and final approval of a cognate, individualized examination, thesis, curriculum project or creative project
3. Completion of M.A. Program portfolio. See description below.

All M.A. requirements listed above must be completed within seven years (14 semesters) of the initiation of graduate study.

School of Education Core Curriculum

The M.A degree with an emphasis in special education is built upon the M.A. core curriculum that includes: EDUC 570 The Reflective Educator (3) EDUC 571 Research Paradigms in Education (3) and one of the following pathways:

Thesis or Project Options: EDUC 598 Developing a Thesis/Project (3) and EDUC 599 Supervised Research for Thesis/Project (3)

Cognate Option: EDUC 572 Supervised Study for Cognate Project (3)

Individualized Examination Option: EDUC 573 Supervised Study for the Individualized Examination (3)

Special Education Concentration

The special education coursework, taken in addition to the M.A. core curriculum, includes four 3-unit courses that are part of the Professional Level II Education Specialist Credential program in Mild/Moderate and Moderate/Severe Disabilities.
EDSP 512 Advanced Issues in Assessment, Curriculum, and Instruction of Students with Disabilities (3)
EDSP 513 Current and Emerging Research and Practice in Special Education (3)
EDSP 514 Advanced Communication, Collaboration, and Consultation in Special Education
EDSP 515 Advanced Legal Issues in Special Education (3) M.A. candidates will apply either 9 or 12 of the Level II special education coursework units toward their M.A. degree.

Electives

Candidates have the opportunity to seek breadth or depth in a related area of study through completion of elective courses. The number of elective units needed to complete the M.A. degree requirements varies depending upon the culminating option selected. Elective coursework may be drawn from other graduate programs in the School of Education, or other departments at Sonoma State University, such as psychology, counseling, kinesiology, or others. These courses are selected with the advice and approval of the special education faculty.

Course of Study

Professional Level II Candidates

Currently, Professional Level II courses in special education are offered on a rotating basis of two courses per semester (EDSP 512 & 514 in the fall and EDSP 513 & 515 in the spring). Level II candidates may enter in the fall or spring semester and begin their credential program of study with the course being offered that particular semester. During the first and the final semesters of the program, candidates also take a one-unit seminar related to the initial development and subsequently the final evaluation of the Professional Induction Plan (EDSP 511 and EDSP 516). Qualified applicants to the M.A. program in Education with a concentration in Special Education can be accepted in both fall and spring semesters. Those accepted into the M.A. program would have the option of beginning the M.A. program core coursework in the first semester of Level II study. Many students, however, may choose to take EDUC 570 in the second semester, particularly since the first semester of the Level II program requires four units of study.

Non-Professional Level II Candidates

Qualified applicants to the M.A. program in Education with a concentration in Special Education may be accepted in both fall and spring semesters. Candidates from other programs seeking an M.A. in Education with a concentration in Special Education are expected to complete three or four courses in the Level II program (9-12 units) although they are not expected to formally enroll in the Professional Level II program. Priority for enrollment in all Level II programs is given to candidates seeking the Professional Level II certificate. Therefore, consent of the instructor is required before outside candidates enroll in any Level II course.

Advising

All M.A candidates within the Special Education concentration will be assigned to a special education faculty advisor for the purpose of developing an individualized program of study. Electives will be determined in consideration with the advisor, in an effort to provide a broader program of study that responds to varying student interests.

Pathways to Program Completion

The M.A. program of study requires 30-36 semester units of coursework, depending on the M.A. in Education pathway a student selects. There are three pathways to program completion, including the thesis/project, cognate, and individualized examination. We encourage students to become knowledgeable about each of the pathways in order to pursue a program of study that meets their professional goals within their preferred style of learning.

In all three pathways, graduate students take 18 units in the program area of concentration and at least 6 units (EDUC 570 and 571) of M.A. core courses. All M.A. students work with a three-member committee, and most closely with the committee chair, to complete a culminating activity which is presented to the committee in a public forum. In addition to these points in common, there are distinct differences among the three pathways to program completion, as described below.

Thesis/Project

The thesis/project pathway is a 30-unit course of study, including 18 units in students? program area of concentration and 12 units of core courses (EDUC 570, 571, 598, and 599). In order to prepare for the thesis/project, students must take Education 598 (Developing a Thesis/Project) and 599 (Supervised Study for the Thesis/Project) as their final two courses in the M.A. program.

The thesis is a written product of a systematic study of a significant problem in education. The project is a written document describing a significant undertaking appropriate to education. The thesis/project option requires an extensive write-up, including an in-depth literature review. Students must also present their thesis/project to their three-member committee in a public forum. Examples of a thesis investigation include process/product research, correlational study, action research, ethnographic study, historical study, or theoretical study. Examples of a project include curriculum design, professional development for educators, program design, performance piece, or creative project.

Cognate

The cognate pathway is a 36-unit course of study, including 18 units in the students? program area of concentration, 9 units of core courses (EDUC 570, 571, and 572), and a 9-unit cognate course of study. The cognate course of study is a group of courses which students choose in consultation with a faculty advisor and/or committee chair, and that allows students to examine areas of interest related to their M.A. concentration. In order to work with their three-member committee on the cognate project, students must take Education 572 (Supervised Study for the Cognate Project) as their final course in the M.A. program.

The cognate project (e.g., portfolio, professional article, video, website, field-based product) is a significant undertaking through which students connect their cognate course of study with the M.A. core courses, program concentration, and/or work in the field. The project may address, for example, implications of the cognate course of study for the classroom, reflections on new teaching practices, response to scholarly research, or educational theory. A written reflection must be included in the project. Students must present the completed project to their three-member committee in a public forum.

Individualized Examination

The individualized examination pathway is a 33-unit course of study, including 18 units in the students? program area of concentration, 9 units of core courses (EDUC 570, 571, and 573), and 6 units of elective courses. For the electives, students, in consultation with their faculty advisor and/or committee chair, choose courses which allow them to examine areas of interest related to the M.A. concentration and to focus on the examination area(s) of study that they have chosen. In order to work with their three-member committee as they prepare for the examination, students must take Education 573 (Supervised Study for the Individualized Examination) as their final course in the M.A. program.

The individualized examination addresses areas of study identified by the student in consultation with the student?s examination committee. The exam is written by the student?s committee (a chair plus two other members) and consists of four questions related to the student?s area(s) of study, including one question submitted in advance to the committee by the student. When the student is ready to take the examination, he/she receives the questions from the chair and has 72 hours to complete the written examination and to return it to the chair. Within two weeks of completing the examination, the student must meet with the committee for an oral examination in which the committee asks follow-up questions for clarification and elaboration.

M.A. Portfolio

In order to advance to candidacy, all students must complete a program portfolio and present it to their committee. In most cases, this presentation occurs at the same meeting where the student presents a proposal for the culminating activity. The program portfolio contains artifacts (papers, projects, etc.) produced by the student throughout the M.A. program which demonstrate the student?s proficiency and growth in the areas listed below. The portfolio should be reflective in nature and should show personal, professional, and intellectual growth. It should also demonstrate how the student?s M.A. program has prepared the student to undertake the culminating activity (thesis/project, cognate project, or individual examination).

In the program portfolio, students are expected to demonstrate:

  • Personal, intellectual, and professional growth over the course of the M.A. program
  • Written language proficiency
  • Breadth and depth of knowledge in educational research
  • Breadth and depth of knowledge in the program area of concentration
  • Evidence of planning toward the completion of the culminating activity (thesis/project, cognate project, or individualized examination)

Requirements for M.A. Advancement to Candidacy

    Completion of M.A. core courses EDUC 570 and 571, and of M.A. concentrations. Presentation and approval of program portfolio. Filing of Advancement to Candidacy form with School of Education graduate director.

Educational Leadership Program Administrative Service Credentials

The Administrative Services Credential programs (Preliminary Administrative Services, Professional Administrative Services, Preliminary Intern Credential) were designed collaboratively by SSU faculty and local school administrators to prepare graduates for positions of leadership in K-12 educational institutions. Credentials authorize the holder to serve as a superintendent, as site administrator, or in a district-level position. The Preliminary Administrative Services Credential program (PASC I) focuses on entry-level skills for effective administration of elementary and secondary schools, with particular emphasis on the responsibilities of the principal. An intern program is available for individuals assigned to an administrative position but who have not earned the PASC I credential. The Professional Administrative Services Credential program (PASC II) offers advanced study and field work for practicing administrators in all areas of educational administration. All programs were designed with the working professional in mind. The PASC I Program and PASC I Intern Program are scheduled during the late afternoon and evening; the PASC II Program is scheduled on Saturday.

V. Preliminary Administrative Services Credential (PASC I)

In addition to the general admission requirements for advanced credential programs, PASC I candidates must:
  1. Verify three years of appropriate full-time experience (on district letterhead noting inclusive dates, level and responsibilities) authorized by a teaching or services credential.
  2. Secure favorable recommendations from two school administrators indicating possession of administrative and leadership potential.
  3. Submit evidence of successful passage of CBEST before or within the first semester of program coursework.

The Preliminary Administrative Services Credential Program consists of 25 units of coursework, 29 for interns. Courses are limited to those individuals accepted in the PASC I Program. The structure of the program unites the administrative practicum experience with the core program curriculum, which is an integrated learning experience. The program is designed to provide students with a strong foundation or knowledge base and opportunities for the application of that knowledge. Areas of emphasis in the curriculum include:
EDEL 404 Computer Uses in Education 2
EDEL 580A Educational Leadership and School Management 3
EDEL 580B Educational Leadership and School Management 3
EDEL 581 Management of Education Personnel: Policies and Procedures 3
EDEL 582 School-Community Relationships and Politics 3
EDEL 583 School Governance: Judicial, Legislative and Financial Aspects 3
EDEL 587 Field Experience in Administration 2-6
EDEL 588 Educational Curriculum 3
EDEL 589 Leadership for Diverse Populations 3
Total units for PASC I 25
Total units for PASC I Interns 29

This program can be completed in twelve months and students may combine their advanced credential studies with an M.A. degree in education with emphasis in educational administration.

VI. Professional Administrative Services Credential (PASC II)

In addition to the general admission requirements for advanced credential programs, PASC II candidates must:
  1. Verify grade point average of at least 3.00 in the last 30 semester units.
  2. Secure favorable recommendations from two school administrators indicating the applicant?s administrative and leadership capability and current administrative activities and accomplishments.
  3. Provide two photocopies of a valid Preliminary Administrative Services Credential.

The Professional Administrative Services Credential Program consists of 24 units of coursework, restricted to those formally admitted to the program. The following criteria must be met:

  1. Employment in an administrative position requiring a Preliminary Administrative Services Credential.
  2. Twelve units or more shall consist of direct instruction in PASC II, SSU courses.
  3. Two units shall consist of the development of a PASC II Induction Plan; two units shall consist of assessment of completion of the Induction Plan.
  4. Eight semester units or 120 clock hours shall consist of the PASC II Professional Development Plan. The 8 units or 120 clock hours of professional development activities shall be in addition to the prescribed 12 units of direct instruction at Sonoma State University.

The Professional Administrative Services Credential Program acknowledges that the professional must move beyond the functional aspects of performing administrative service, to reflecting and thinking about one?s role and behavior as leader. To this end the curriculum focuses on action research plans developed by the student in conjunction with sponsoring school district. The program consists of the following:

PASC II Direct Instruction:

EDEL 596A Advanced Field Experiences: Organizational Theory, Planning and Application 2
EDEL 596B Advanced Field Experiences: Reflective Leadership 2
EDEL 596C Advanced Field Experiences: Evaluation and Strategic Issues Management 2
EDEL 596D Advanced Field Experiences: School Law and Public Policy 2
EDEL 596E Advanced Field Experiences: Fiscal and Human Resource Management 2
EDEL 596F Advanced Field Experiences: Cultural and Organizational Environment 2

PASC II Professional Development Plan:

Eight additional semester units or 120 clock hours of approved Professional Development Plan
Professional Development Plan 8

The Professional Administrative Services Credential Program acknowledges that the professional must move beyond the functional aspects of performing administrative service, to reflecting and thinking about one?s role and behavior as a leader. To this end the curriculum focuses on action research plans developed by the student in conjunction with sponsoring school district. The program consists of the following:

PASC II Induction Plan:

EDEL 590A Advanced Leadership Assessment: Induction Plan (at the beginning of PASC II) 2
EDEL 590B Competency Review Seminar: Assessment of Induction Plan (at the completion of PASC II) 2
Total units for PASC II 24

VII. Internship Program in Educational Administration

At present, the internship program in Educational Administration is simply embedded in the traditional program coursework and fieldwork. However, the faculty and representatives of the Community Advisory Committee of the Educational Leadership program are in the process of reviewing and modifying the existing intern program. Interested parties are asked to contact Dr. Bob Vieth, the advisor for the Educational Leadership program, for more current program details.

VIII. Master of Arts with a Concentration in Educational Leadership

The objective of the M.A. degree program with concentration in Educational Leadership is to provide a strong academic foundation for competent administrative practice. The program is 30 semester units inclusive of course requirements for the PASC I/II programs. The degree may be taken in conjunction with either credential program. Completion of a thesis or creative project gives candidates the opportunity to synthesize the credential program work and related leadership activities.

The M.A. degree with an emphasis in Educational Leadership is built upon the M.A. core curriculum of the School of Education described above under Special Education.

Additional information on this M.A. degree may be obtained from the Teacher Recruitment and Information Center of the School of Education or on the website, www.sonoma.edu/education. Or call for information at (707) 664-2131.

Education Courses (EDUC)

417 School and Society (3) / Fall, Spring

A critical examination of current issues in today?s schools and future directions in education through the perspectives of history, philosophy, sociology, anthropology, and the politics of education. Content includes: trends, movements and issues of the development of our present-day school systems and current educational practice; development of an individual philosophy of education through examination and evaluation of educational philosophies from early Greek through modern/post-modern thought; analysis of American society and its effect on the functioning of schools; the role of explicit and implicit cultural assumptions in educational contexts; and the influence of federal, state and local governing agencies, the knowledge industry and special-interest groups on education. Grade only. Satisfies GE, category D1 (Individual and Society).

490 Selected Topics in Education (1-4) / Fall, Spring

A course designed according to the interest of a particular faculty member, providing opportunities for diversification in content and reading. Grade only.

495 Special Studies (1-4) / Fall, Spring

Independent study designed in consultation with an instructor. Grade only. Prerequisites: successful completion of at least two courses in the School of Education, and submission of a completed SSU special studies form with required approvals during the first week of classes.

Graduate Courses

500 Advanced Selected Topics in Education (1-4) Fall, Spring

A graduate course designed according to the interest of a particular faculty member, providing opportunities for diversification in content and reading. Grade only.

570 The Reflective Educator (3) / Fall, Spring

This is the first in a series of three graduate core courses in the School of Education. Students will take this course at the beginning of the M.A. program. The focus of this course is on philosophical, historical, social, and psychological perspectives in education. Students will examine these perspectives while being encouraged to examine and reflect upon their own professional practices in education. In this course, students will begin to construct a reflective program portfolio that they will continue to modify throughout their M.A. program. The portfolio is intended to be cumulative throughout the graduate core courses. Grade only. Prerequisite: admission to M.A. in Education program.

571 Research Paradigms in Education (3)/ Fall, Spring

This course focuses on students as critical consumers of research and includes among its goals the development of skills in the analysis and critique of educational research. The course addresses research and field needs of practicing educators as opposed to the needs of professional researchers, and serves to acquaint students with basic principles and techniques of educational research. It also provides students with an opportunity to integrate knowledge of these principles through analyses of action research projects that may serve as the foundation for the M.A. in Education culminating activity. Grade only.

572 Supervised Study for the Cognate Project (3) Fall, Spring

This supervised independent study provides students with guidance in the completion of their cognate project. Under the direction of the committee chair, and in consultation with all committee members, students will complete (1) a project that synthesizes their cognate coursework and connects it to their M.A. Program Concentration, and (2) a scholarly reflection which accompanies the project. Following completion of the project, students will participate in a formal presentation of their work to faculty and colleagues. Cr/NC. Prerequisite: advancement to candidacy.

573 Supervised Study for the Individualized Examination (3) / Fall, Spring

This supervised independent study provides students with guidance in preparing for the individualized examination. Under the direction of the committee chair, and in consultation with all committee members, each student will determine the areas of study to be addressed in the examination, choose relevant readings, and conduct a concentrated study of those areas to prepare for the exam. Following completion of the written exam, students will take an oral exam in which committee members ask follow-up questions to the written responses. Cr/NC. Prerequisite: advancement to candidacy.

578 Project Continuation (1-3) / Fall, Spring

Designed for students working on their thesis or master?s project but who have otherwise completed all graduate coursework toward their degree. This course cannot be applied toward the minimum number of units needed for completion of the master?s degree. Prerequisite: permission of the graduate coordinator. Cr/NC only.

595 Special Studies (1-4) / Fall, Spring

Independent study designed in consultation with an instructor. Grade only. Prerequisite: Students must complete the standard SSU form and secure the required approvals during the first week of classes.

598 Developing a Thesis/Project (3)

This is the final course in the graduate core courses in education. This course develops students? abilities to carry out a thesis or project and provides basic information for planning and implementing the Master of Arts degree proposal. The main goal is to provide students with knowledge to begin their thesis or project. Time is provided students to assess progress in the program and to complete portfolio development. Grade only. Prerequisite: completion of all M.A. coursework or taken in final semester of M.A. coursework.

599 Supervised Research for Thesis/Project (3)

Supervised Research provides students with guidance in the completion of their research project. Under the direction of the committee chair, and in consultation with all committee members, students will complete the thesis or project that was developed in EDUC 598 Developing a Thesis/Project. Following completion of the research project, students will participate in a formal presentation of their work to faculty and colleagues. Cr/NC. Prerequisite: completion of EDUC 598. Advancement to candidacy approved.

Educational Leadership Courses (EDEL)

580A Educational Leadership and School Management (3) / Fall

Organizational theory and development as applied to district and school roles and policies; evolution of public schools; alternative leadership modes, communication and decision making; adult learning and development, and facilitating organizational change. Grade only. This course is part of the Preliminary Administrative Services Credential program. Prerequisite: admission to Preliminary Administrative Services Credential program.

580B Educational Leadership and School Management (3) / Spring

Advanced study of organizational theory and practices. Effective schools research; alternative ways of organizing and managing schools; short- and long-range planning; delegating responsibility; resource and plant management; uses of technology; practice in problem solving and conflict resolution using a variety of techniques. Grade only. This course is part of the Preliminary Administrative Services Credential program. Prerequisite: admission to Preliminary Administrative Services Credential program.

581 Management of Educational Personnel: Policies and Procedures (3) / Spring

Human relationships and their implications for the organization; practice in techniques of clinical supervision; skills in supervising and evaluating staff; personnel management; issues in collective bargaining; planning, providing and evaluating staff development. Grade only. This course is part of the Preliminary Administrative Services Credential program. Prerequisite: admission to Preliminary Administrative Services Credential program.

582 School ? Community Relationships and Politics (3) / Fall

Concepts of power and influence in community, district, and staff; school, parent, and community group roles in educational process; procedures for maintaining open communication with diverse constituencies; the administrator as a community leader and political force. Grade only. This course is part of the Preliminary Administrative Services Credential program. Prerequisite: admission to Preliminary Administrative Services Credential program.

583 School Governance: Judicial, Legislative and Financial Aspects (3) / Summer

A study of emerging social groups and forces impacting public and private education; civil liberties, school records, integration and bilingual education legal structures; collective bargaining; funding and budgeting; current judicial, legislative and financial aspects of school governance; contract compliance; communicating legal and financial information to staff, colleagues, and community. Grade only. This course is part of the Preliminary Administrative Services Credential program. Prerequisite: admission to Preliminary Administrative Services Credential program.

587 Field Experience in Administration (1-3) Fall, Spring

Intensive field experience in school administration that extends learnings and competencies in program coursework. Prerequisites: admission to the Preliminary Administrative Services Credential program and consent of instructor.

588 Educational Curriculum (3) /Spring

Study and practical experiences in the design, development, implementation, and evaluation of K-12 curriculum. Major areas addressed include: philosophical, historical, psychological, and socio-cultural foundations of curriculum; roles of school personnel; curriculum theory; issues, trends, and future directions; development, implementation, support and evaluation of curriculum; the role of staff development. Grade only. This course is part of the Preliminary Administrative Services Credential Program. Prerequisite: admission to the Preliminary Administrative Services credential program.

589 Leadership for Diverse Populations (3) / Fall

The goal of this learning experience is to increase participants? understanding and awareness of the impact of instructional practices and administrative decisions upon all students. Topics include: definitions of diversity; identification of instructional needs of students; regulations of categorical programs; legal issues that affect all students; instructional strategies and curriculum for students with special learning needs; school policies and rules as reflections of diverse communities; issues of gender, race, ability level, language, cultural, and socio-economic background and the impact of these in the school setting. Grade only. This course is part of the Preliminary Administrative Services Credential Program. Prerequisite: admission to the Preliminary Administrative Services Credential program.

590A Advanced Leadership Assessment: Induction Plan (2) / Fall, Spring

Leadership skills and knowledge base will be evaluated through formal assessment procedures, including self-assessment and an employing district or county assessment. An individualized plan will be developed that prescribes work undertaken by the candidate. Cr/NC only. This learning experience is part of the Professional Administrative Services Credential program. Prerequisites: possession of Preliminary Administrative Services Credential and admission to the Professional Administrative Services Credential program.

590B Competency Review Seminar: Assessment of Induction Plan (2) / Fall, Spring

Candidate shall be asked to submit documentation of skills and experience that demonstrate competencies for the Professional Administrative Services Credential. Cr/NC only. This is part of the Professional Administrative Services Credential program. Prerequisites: all courses in Professional Administrative Services Credential program and consent of instructor.

596A-F Advanced Field Experiences (12) / Fall, Spring

Students will be involved in site-based problem solving and analysis, the generation and field implementation of appropriate solutions, and an evaluation of chosen solutions and actions. Discussion, monitoring, coaching, and evaluation of students? work will occur throughout the Advanced Field Experiences with EDEL 596A serving for the initial planning and development of student inquiry projects. Areas emphasized in the Advanced Field Experiences follow. This learning experience is part of the Professional Administrative Services Credential program. Cr/NC only.
Advanced Field Experience Areas of Emphasis:
  • 596A Organization, Theory, Planning and Application (2) Fall/Sp
  • 596B Reflective Leadership (2) Fall/Sp
  • 596C Evaluation and Strategic Issues Management (2) Fall/Sp
  • 596D School Law and Public Policy (2) Fall/Sp
  • 596E Fiscal and Human Resources Management (2) Fall/Sp
  • 596F Cultural and Organizational Environment (2) Fall/Sp

Prerequisites: Enrollment in EDEL 590A, possession of the Preliminary Administrative Services Credential, and admission to the Professional Administrative Services Credential program.

Special Education/Multiple Subject Courses (EDMS)

437 Seminar: Integrated Curriculum in Preschool Through Elementary (3) / Fall, Spring

Design of integrated curriculum for preschool through elementary school classrooms. Focus is on using skills and concepts identified in California Department of Education frameworks of science, mathematics, language arts, history, social science, visual and performing arts; to plan, implement, and evaluate developmentally appropriate curriculum. Grade only. Prerequisite: admission to Multiple Subject CLAD Early Childhood Emphasis or Education Specialist Credential program or consent of instructor.

462 Teaching Reading/Language Arts in the Elementary School (4) / Fall, Spring

Principles, methods, and materials for a comprehensive, balanced approach to instruction in reading and language arts. Includes current views of reading theory, current issues in reading/language pedagogy, strategies for literacy instruction. To include information, research-based instructional methodologies consistent with the A-M list of reading skills outlined in the California Reading Initiative, evaluating student progress, and the history of American literacy. Emphasis is on the interrelationships between language systems and the cognitive, affective and social aspects of literacy acquisition and development; issues of cultural and language diversity, bilingualism and dialect variation are integral to the course. Teacher candidates spend a minimum of 30 clock hours in an elementary classroom during reading/language arts instruction; no more than 4-5 hours are completed in one week; includes weekly meetings for discussion and feedback. Prerequisites: admission to a Multiple Subject Elementary Credential program or Special Education program. CLAD/BCLAD students must be concurrently enrolled in EDMS 460 and 461. Grade only. Special education prerequisite: admission to the Education Specialist Credential program.

Special Education/Single Subject Courses (EDSS)

418 Learning and Development in Adolescents (3) Fall, Spring

Examination of theories of learning and teaching, social, physical, emotional, and cognitive development, with emphasis on adolescents. Includes the psychological foundations and research-based knowledge about effective secondary/middle school teaching in the areas of planning, implementing and evaluating instruction, motivation, self-esteem, classroom climate, and psychological perspectives on issues of diversity. Grade only.

446 Language and Literacy Across the Curriculum: Middle and Secondary Schools (4) / Fall, Spring

Principles, methods, and materials for guiding students? literary development in subject areas at the secondary level. Includes literacy and language theory and current issues in reading/language pedagogy for first and second language learners. Emphasis is on the interrelationships between language systems and constructivist literacy theory and the cognitive, affective, and social aspects of literacy development in subject areas. Issues of cultural and language diversity related to CLAD competencies, bilingualism, classroom management, lesson and unit design using CLAD competencies, and dialect variation are integral to the course. Students develop materials that contribute to a program portfolio to be evaluated before continuation to student teaching. Grade only. Prerequisites: admission to the Single Subject or Education Specialist Credential program, EDUC 417 and EDUC 418, or permission of instructor.

Special Education Courses (EDSP) 422 Collaborative Partnerships in Special Education (3) / Fall

In this course, students learn basic communication, consultation, and collaboration skills useful in forming productive partnerships with families, school administrators, general and special educators, specialists, paraprofessionals, community agency personnel, and related service providers. Focus is on skills for creating, maintaining, and evaluating effective teams which address long-term planning and transitional stages across the life span of individuals with disabilities. The course requires a variety of field assignments in both regular and special education at the elementary and secondary levels. Students are assigned instructional and collaborative tasks with pupils and teachers in regular education and in resource specialist programs at the elementary and secondary levels. Prerequisite: Admission to the Education Specialist Credential program or by permission of the instructor.

423A Assessment, Curriculum and Instructional Strategies (3) / Fall

This course provides an introduction to the basic principles and strategies of assessment, curriculum, and instruction that are appropriate for individuals with diverse backgrounds, varying language and cognitive abilities, and special needs. Credential candidates learn to assess student needs, plan, implement, modify, and evaluate instruction, including the use of supplementary aids, services, and technology for individuals with disabilities. This course is a prerequisite for EDSP 423B in the Mild/Moderate Disabilities Education Specialist Credential program and EDSP 423C in the Moderate/Severe Disabilities Education Specialist Credential program. Prerequisites: Admission to the Education Specialist Credential program or permission of the instructor.

423B Assessment, Curriculum and Instruction: Applied Strategies for Students with Mild/ Moderate Disabilities (3) / Spring

EDSP 423B represents an in-depth continuation of EDSP 423A for candidates in the Education Specialist Mild/Moderate Disabilities Credential program. Candidates gain practice in administering a variety of norm-referenced and criterion-referenced assessment tools used to identify students with special needs, to determine eligibility for special education services, and to develop and evaluate individualized education plans. Curricular modifications and instructional strategies which support students with mild/moderate disabilities in inclusive settings are explored. Prerequisites: Admission to the Education Specialist Mild/Moderate Disabilities Credential program and EDSP 423A.

423C Assessment, Curriculum and Instruction: Applied Strategies for Students with Moderate and Severe Disabilities (3) / Spring

EDSP 423C represents an in-depth continuation of EDSP 423A for Special Education Credential candidates in the Moderate/Severe Disabilities Credential program. EDSP 423C builds upon the basic information on assessment, curriculum, and instruction presented in EDSP 423A with specialized knowledge and techniques appropriate for crafting educational programs for learners with moderate and severe disabilities. Assessment and curriculum development techniques which are functionally tied to real world demands and which are referenced to the requirements for successful inclusion in school, community, and workplace are emphasized. Curricular modifications suitable for teaching learners with moderate and severe disabilities the skills necessary for meaningful education in the ?least restrictive environment? are developed as key course elements. Further, attention to transitional events in the education and development of learners is heightened through the course. Prerequisites: Admission to the Education Specialist Moderate/Severe Disabilities credential program and EDSP 423A.

424A Classroom Ecology: Management, Discipline and Behavioral Supports (3) / Fall

EDSP 424A represents a first course in the study of classroom ecologies, classroom management, discipline and behavioral supports for Special Education credential candidates in both the Mild/Moderate and Moderate/Severe Disabilities programs. Course content offers theoretical and conceptual underpinnings of the development of social and academic behavior of students with special educational needs. Theoretical and conceptual foundations from a variety of paradigms are developed into applied techniques of classroom management and positive behavioral supports through a series of readings, exercises, and assignments throughout the course. This course is a prerequisite to either EDSP 424B for candidates in the Mild/Moderate Disabilities Credential program, or EDSP 424C for those pursuing the Moderate/Severe Credential. Prerequisite: Admission to the Education Specialist credential program or permission of the instructor.

424B Classroom Ecology: Social Competence and Applied Problem-Solving (3) / Spring

EDSP 424B is a continuation of EDSP 424A for Special Education credential candidates in the Mild/Moderate Disabilities program, offering additional in-depth coverage of the complex cluster of events affecting the formation of classroom ecologies and the development of social competence and applied problem-solving skills for learners with mild and moderate disabilities. Content includes study of several dominant theoretical models for viewing the social and academic behavior of such learners. Students are required to evaluate critically various theoretical positions and select one or more for in-depth study. As an out-growth of this study, students will begin the development of a personalized approach to classroom ecological planning that will include emphasis on social competence, self-control and applied problem solving for learners with mild/moderate disabilities. Prerequisites: Admission to the Education Specialist Mild/Moderate Disabilities Credential program, and EDSP 424A.

424C Positive Behavioral Supports and Instructional Models (3) / Spring

EDSP 424C represents a continuation of EDSP 424A for Special Education credential candidates in the Moderate/Severe Disabilities program. EDSP 424C offers additional in-depth coverage of the cluster of environmental, social, and instructional events which special educators may arrange to provide positive behavioral supports and improved learning opportunities for learners with moderate and severe disabilities. Course content focuses on Applied Behavior Analysis and its derivatives as they have been successfully employed to address behavioral and instructional needs in the context of special education for learners with moderate and severe disabilities. Emphasis throughout the course is placed upon the communicative intent of behavior, the development of positive supports for behavioral development and improvement and the recognition of the inherent respect due all learners while engaged in behavior change efforts. Prerequisites: Admission to the Education Specialist Moderate/Severe Disabilities Credential program and EDSP 424A.

425 Developing Academic Performance of Students with Mild/Moderate Disabilities (3) / Fall

This course is designed to provide specialist teachers with a research-based perspective on developing academic performance, with a focus on the early intervention and prevention of academic problems. Also included in the course are educational approaches for working with students who demonstrate difficulties in learning. Candidates learn research-validated ?best practices? for language and academic development. Coursework will follow a ?theory into practice? format consisting of classroom simulations, visitations, guided activities, and student projects using field-based lessons. Prerequisites: Admission to the Education Specialist Credential program or permission of instructor.

428 Professional Seminar: Topics in the Education of Students with Moderate and Severe Disabilities (3) / Fall

EDSP 428 is an advanced ?Professional Seminar? for Special Education credential candidates in the Moderate/Severe Disabilities Credential program. Topics include the relative advantages of various interventions for students with moderate and severe disabilities, medical and health issues and competencies for teachers of medically fragile or multiply- handicapped learners, the building of circles of support for learners with significant disabilities, and health-related needs. Further, the concepts of the ?least restrictive environments,? dignity of risk, school-to-work transition, self-advocacy, inclusive communities, and ?circles of friends? will be explored. EDSP 428 is designed around a professional seminar format in order to permit a focus on innovative conceptualizations, practices, and legal mandates, while retaining the ability to shift topics as they emerge in the field over time. EDSP 428 will include guest presenters with specialized expertise such as physicians and nurses specializing in disabled populations, occupational therapists, community activists from the disabled community, and private school practitioners and administrators. Seminars will occasionally be held in other settings, such as clinics or private schools, as appropriate to demonstrate the content of the topic under consideration. Prerequisite: Admission to the Education Specialist Moderate/Severe Disabilities Credential program or permission of the instructor.

430 Special Education for Teachers (4) Fall, Spring, Summer

A survey course that presents theory, program concepts, and teaching practices related to students with special educational needs. Legislation, public policy, and advocacy related to the full inclusion of students with special needs into the least restrictive environment are reviewed. Additionally, assessment, curriculum and instructional modifications designed to accommodate learners with diverse backgrounds (cultural, linguistic, socioeconomic) and abilities are addressed. Thirty hours of required field experience are an integral part of the course. Grade only. This course meets the special education requirements to convert a basic credential to a Professional Clear Credential and is a required beginning course for students in the Education Specialist Credential program.

465 Student Teaching Practicum: Mild/Moderate Disabilities (10) / Fall, Spring

EDSP 465 represents the student teaching component of the Mild/Moderate Disabilities credential program. Student teaching is a culminating experience that must occur in the final semester of the program. Credential candidates student teach for 12 weeks under the guidance and supervision of a duly selected master teacher in the schools as well as a university supervisor from Sonoma State University. Student teaching sites are selected to reflect current prevailing practices in the education of learners with mild or moderate disabilities. Thus, resource specialist programs, special day classes, transitional classes, inclusion programs, and ?non-public schools? certified by the California Department of Education all represent possible placement sites for student teachers. Candidates may receive student teaching credit for assignments where they are also the ?teacher of record,? or otherwise employed, contingent on suitable supervision and guidance availability on-site. Cr/NC only. Prerequisites: Admission to the Education Specialist Mild/Moderate Disabilities Credential program, and EDSP 422, EDSP 423A, EDSP 424A. Corequisite: EDSP 466.

466 Student Teaching Seminar: Mild/Moderate Disabilities (1) / Fall, Spring

EDSP 466 represents the seminar which accompanies the student teaching component of the Education Specialist Mild/Moderate Disabilities Credential program. The seminar is designed to provide a problem-solving forum for the myriad of educational, social, and psychological issues which tend to arise as part of student teaching. Guidance and support aimed at a successful student teaching experience is offered through EDSP 466. In addition to the instructor of EDSP 466, occasional guest visits by student teaching supervisors, resident teachers, and school administrators will complement the class sessions. Candidates will also be provided time to form cooperative support groups around commonalities of assignment or problem areas. Cr/NC only. Prerequisites: Admission to the Education Specialist Mild/Moderate Disabilities Credential program, EDSP 422, EDSP 423A, EDSP 424A. Corequisite: EDSP 465.

467 Student Teaching Practicum: Moderate/Severe Disabilities (10) / Fall, Spring

EDSP 467 represents the student teaching component of the Education Specialist Moderate/Severe Disabilities Credential program. Student teaching is a culminating experience that must occur in the final semester of the program. Credential candidates student teach for 12 weeks under the guidance and supervision of a duly selected master teacher in the schools as well as a university supervisor from Sonoma State University. Student teaching sites are selected to reflect current prevailing practices in the education of learners with moderate or severe disabilities. Thus, resource specialist programs, special day classes, transitional classes, inclusion programs, and ?non-public schools? certified by the California Department of Education all represent possible placement sites for student teachers. Candidates may receive student teaching credit for assignments where they are also the ?teacher of record,? or otherwise employed, contingent on suitable supervision and guidance availability on-site. Cr/NC only. Prerequisites: Admission to the Education Specialist Moderate/Severe Disabilities Credential program, and EDSP 422, EDSP 423A, EDSP 424A. Corequisite: EDSP 468.

511 Professional Induction Plan: Supervised Development (1) / Fall, Spring

EDSP 511 is the initial course in the Professional Level II Education Specialist Credential program. This course offers a forum for the development of an individualized plan for the induction of new special education teachers into the profession of Special Education. The Individual Learning Plan developed during Preliminary Level I forms the basis for development of the induction plan. The Professional Induction Plan is developed in response to the new teachers? areas of professional needs and interests. It is developed by the candidate with University faculty, school district mentors/ support providers, and other teachers. Cr/NC only. Prerequisite: Admission into the Professional Level II Education Specialist Credential program.

512 Advanced Issues in Assessment, Curriculum, and Instruction for Students with Disabilities (3) Spring, alternate years

EDSP 512 is part of the Professional Level II Education Specialist Credential program. Foundational knowledge in assessment , curriculum, and instruction is extended within EDSP 512. Candidates gain advanced skills in planning, conducting, reporting, and utilizing a variety of assessments, and in integrating assessment results into instructional planning. Issues such as assessment bias and research, law, and policies and procedures pertaining to the assessment process are addressed. Broad curricula areas including vocational development and community living preparation, diverse instructional approaches, and educational technologies are also addressed. Adaptation and modification of assessment, curriculum, and instruction to meet the individuals needs of students with disabilities is a course focus. Prerequisite: Admission into the Professional Level II Education Specialist Credential Program.

513 Current and Emerging Research and Practice in Special Education (3) / Fall, alternate years

EDSP 513 is part of the Level II Education Specialist Credential program. The course will critically examine emerging research on varied issues impacting special educational policy and practice. The value of empiricism as a philosophy, and data-based teaching practices will be explored. The issues surrounding quantitative and qualitative measurement along with varied conceptualizations of validity, reliability, and accountable practice will be explored via assigned readings and individual projects. These projects will require students to assess the research-based merits of selected special educational practices. Candidates will be required to triangulate various quantitative and qualitative measures of educational and policy effectiveness in order to render empirically informed conclusions about differential effects of various practices in the field of special education. Prerequisite: Admission into the Professional Level II Education Specialist Credential program.

514 Advanced Communication, Collaboration and Consultation in Special Education (3) Spring, alternate years

EDSP 514 is a required course for the Professional Level II Education Specialist Credential program. EDSP 514 explores advanced issues surrounding communication, collaboration, and consultation in special education. The effective performance of educational leadership, advocacy, and team management, as well as methods for positively representing special education to parents, administrators, and other educators are addressed in the course. Additionally, skills and methods of collaborating and communicating with professionals and paraprofessionals about students? complex emotional and behavioral needs are addressed. The area of cross-agency transitional services and individualized transitional experiences are explored with emphasis on communication and collaboration across human service agencies. The development of collaborative planning, evaluation and refinement of instructional strategies, curriculum, adaptations and behavioral support are also required of candidates taking EDSP 514. Prerequisite: Admission into the Professional Level II Education Specialist Credential program.

515 Advanced Legal Issues in Special Education (3) Fall, alternate years

EDSP 515 is part of the Professional Level II Education Specialist Credential program. Advanced legal issues faced by teachers, administrators, and parents in special education are addressed. Topics include entitlement to services, procedural due process, complaint resolution, least-restrictive environment, provision of related services, parent participation, shared decision-making, and other related legal issues. Candidates review federal legislation, case law, and statutory requirements within the context of understanding the legal framework underlying special education and providing services, which are legally, as well as programmatically, sound. Prerequisite: Admission into the Professional Level II Education Specialist credential program.

516 Professional Induction Plan: Culminating Assessment (1) / Fall, Spring

EDSP 516 is the final course in Professional Level II Education Specialist Credential program. This course creates a context for the culminating assessment of the individualized Professional Induction Plan. Candidates will collaboratively assess the elements presented in their induction plans developed in EDSP 511. Working with University faculty, school district support staff, and other teachers, the candidates will evaluate the attainment of their professional goals by reviewing the evidence contained in their Professional Portfolio and applied to their school settings. Areas for continued professional growth will also be identified. Cr/NC only. Prerequisite: Admission into the Professional Level II Education Specialist Credential program.

555 Teaching Students Who Are Severely Emotionally Disturbed (3)

Description and evaluation of major theoretical approaches to teaching students identified as ?severely emotionally disturbed.? Includes the identification and review of research on issues and trends and how each relates to designing and implementing instructional programs. Content includes discussion of teaching basic skills to students with emotional and behavioral disturbances. Observation and participation in field work required. Prerequisite: permission of special education coordinator.

562 Resource Specialists in Special Education (3) / Fall

Study of role and responsibilities of resource specialists in the public schools. Grade only. Prerequisite: admission into resource specialist program.

563 Consultation and Collaboration in Special Education (3) / Spring

Focuses on teaching basic communication skills, collaborative consultation techniques, in-service training skills, and implementation and evaluation processes utilized in a collaborative model. Observations and field experience are a required component of this class. Grade only. Prerequisite: admission into resource specialist program.


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