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Kinesiology

Department Office
PE14
707 664-2357
www.sonoma.edu/kinesiology

Department Chair
Tom Ormond

Department Coordinator
Nancy Crosat

Faculty
Wanda Boda, Ellen Carlton, Brett Christie, C. Douglas Earl, James Gale, Elaine McHugh, Tom Ormond, Lea Ann "Beez" Schell, Steven Winter

Course Plan / Sample Four-Year Program for Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology: Exercise Science Concentration / Sample Four-Year Program for Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology: Physical Education, Adapted Physical Education, Athletic Training Concentrations / Major Concentrations / Minor in Kinesiology / Master of Arts Kinesiology / Individual Class Descriptions

Programs offered
Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology
Master of Arts in Kinesiology
Minor in Kinesiology
Single Subject Teaching Credential Prepartation


Kinesiology, as the study of human movement, utilizes a comprehensive and integrative approach to examine phenomena related to all aspects of physical activity. The curriculum offered by the Department of Kinesiology prepares graduates who can apply kinesiological principles to the acquisition, performance, and refinement of motor skills and to the use of physical activity as an educative tool and a medium for health promotion, personal well being, and participation in an active life style. The curriculum addresses human movement across the life span from biological/physical, behavioral, socio-cultural, and humanistic perspectives, with attention given to the unique and common needs of all people in a wide variety of contexts and conditions.

In conjunction with the broader educational mission of the University, the kinesiology major program prepares students to lead and participate in a modern complex society and to assume multiple roles throughout their lifetimes. Graduates have acquired knowledge and experiences that prepare them to pursue lifelong learning, advanced study, and/or careers in such areas as teaching, coaching, adapted physical education, allied health fields, health and fitness industries, sport industries, athletic training, or exercise and movement science. To achieve this mission the kinesiology major provides students with a well structured set of curricular and co-curricular experiences and the mentorship to derive a sound education from the university experience.

The Department of Kinesiology programs lead to the B.S. or M.A. degrees. In both programs a core of courses is required. Beyond this core, the kinesiology student chooses a concentration of courses with a specific focus. The undergraduate may select physical education, adapted physical education, exercise science, athletic training, or interdisciplinary studies in kinesiology. Theoretical and practical learning experiences are an important part of all concentrations. Students are required to participate in a variety of field experiences, working as coaching assistants, teacher?s aides, exercise/recreation leaders, student athletic trainers, and instructors for disabled students .

Prior to beginning upper-division studies in Kinesiology, students should have acquired the certain knowledge and skills necessary for success. Courses with specific application to the kinesiology degree are included as support courses for the major. All students entering the upper-division kinesiology degree should:
? be able to utilize computing technology in support of inquiry.
? demonstrate knowledge of a broad range of concepts, issues, facts and theories derived from the biological, physical, behavioral, and social sciences, and from the humanities.
? demonstrate critical thinking, writing, reading, oral communication, quantitative and qualitative analysis, and information management skills.
? document experience in a variety of movement forms and fitness activities.

At the completion of the undergraduate degree all graduates should:
? demonstrate knowledge and skill in a broad variety of movement and fitness activities.
? understand the biological/physical and behavioral bases of movement and the changes that occur across the life span, within diverse populations, and under a variety of environmental conditions.
? understand the socio-cultural and humanistic bases of movement with diverse cultures, historical periods, and social settings.
? understand how motor skills are acquired and fitness achieved and maintained across the life span and within diverse populations.
? understand the relationship among movement, conditioning, and training, well-being and skill across the life span and under a variety of environmental and personally unique conditions.
? know how to apply kinesiological knowledge to enhance motor skill and fitness in a variety of populations and conditions.
? apply critical thinking, writing, reading, oral communication, quantitative and qualitative analysis, and information management skills to movement-related questions.
? demonstrate knowledge of the conditions of safe practice in movement-related contexts across the life span and within diverse populations, and respond appropriately to common injuries occurring during physical activity.
? be able to use and apply kinesiological data collection techniques and measurement theory to assess, analyze and evaluate human performance.
? understand the scientific method and other systematic ways of knowing relative to research and scholarship in human movement.
? demonstrate ability to integrate multidisciplinary knowledge bases of kinesiology in an applied, problem solving context.
? be familiar with standards, ethics, and expectations of professional communities related to human movement.
? be prepared to engage in professionally related community activities.
? be prepared to engage in informed dialogue with diverse professional and lay communities regarding kinesiological principles and practices.
? demonstrate additional in-depth knowledge and skills associated with study in any one of the concentrations, specializations, or emphases that are associated with kinesiology degrees.

Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology

All majors in the Department of Kinesiology must complete the support courses and the major core courses. Each major selects a concentration in which to complete the major.
Degree Requirements units
General education 51
Major requirements 50-52
Support courses (maximum outside GE) 18
General electives 3-5
Total units needed for graduation 124

All courses fulfilling either major or minor requirements in kinesiology must be graded A-F, except for courses not available in the A-F mode or courses that are challenged.

Support Courses for the Bachelor of Science

These courses may be taken at a community college, and some may be used to fulfill general education requirements. Some of these courses are prerequisites to courses in the major. The SSU equivalent is listed in parentheses.
Introduction to Biology (BIOL 115)* 3
Human Anatomy (BIOL 220)* 4
Human Physiology (BIOL 224)* 4
Nutrition 3
Introduction to Computing (CS 101)*+ 3
Total supporting units 17

* GE courses
+ Students in physical education concentration take KIN 307 instead.

Major Core Requirements (all concentrations)

KIN 301 Philosophy/History of Human Movement 4
KIN 305 Psychological Bases of Human Movement 4
KIN 315 Sociology of Sport 3
KIN 330A Measurement and Evaluation or MATH 165 (4) 1
KIN 350 Biomechanics 4
KIN 360 Physiology of Exercise 4
KIN 460 Conditioning for Health and Performance 3
KIN 410 Lifespan Motor Development 3
Total units in the major core 26-29

Sample Four-Year Program for Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology

Exercise Science Concentration

Lower-Division Preparation

Freshman Year: 32 units

Fall Semester (17 units) Spring Semester (15 units)
GE (A2) Chem 115B/116B or 105B
GE (B2) GE (A3)
GE (C1) GE (B4) (161/165)
CS 101 GE (D2)
 Chem 115A/116A or 105A (B1)

Sophomore Year: 29 units

Fall Semester (14 units) Spring Semester (15 units)
GE (A1) GE (D5)
Phys 209 Biol 224
Biol 220 (B3) GE (C4)
GE (D4) GE (D3)

Upper-Division Specialization

Junior Year

Fall Semester Spring Semester
Kin 340/341 Kin 360
KIN 301 Kin 315
GE (C2) GE UD (C3)
GE UD (D1) Kin 410

Senior Year

Fall Semester Spring Semester
Kin 305 GE UD (E)
KIN 350 KIN 460
Elective Nutrition
Elective  

Summer Session Option
Kin 410

In addition to the upper-division specialization, choose one of the following options:

Adult Fitness

Junior Year
Fall Semester (17 units) Spring Semester (16 units)
Kin 330A Bus 219/230
Elective  

Senior Year

Fall Semester (16 units) Spring Semester (14 units)
Kin 430/495 BIOL/GERN Elective

Pre-Physical Therapy

Junior Year

Fall Semester (17 units) Spring Semester (16 units)
Psy 425 Elective  

Senior Year

Fall Semester (16 units) Spring Semester (14 units)
Kin 430D Elective

Biodynamics-Biomechanics

Junior Year

Fall Semester (16 units) Spring Semester (16 units)
Kin 330A Elective
Kin 300 (2)  

Senior Year

Fall Semester (16 units) Spring Semester (15 units)
Kin 430/495 Elective (4)  

Biodynamics-Exercise Physiology

Junior Year

Fall Semester (17 units) Spring Semester (16 units)
Kin 330A Elective
Chem 340  

Senior Year

Fall Semester (16 units) Spring Semester (14 units)
Kin 430/495 BIOL/GERN Elective

Sample Four-Year Program for Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology

Physical Education, Adapted Physical Education, Athletic Training Concentrations

Lower-Division Preparation

Freshman Year: 32 units
Fall Semester (17 units) Spring Semester (15 units)
GE (A2) Elective
GE (B2) GE (A3)
GE (B4) GE (C4)
CS 101 GE (D2)
GE (B1) GE (C2)

Sophomore Year: 31-32 units

 Fall Semester (16 units)  Spring Semester (14-16 units)
 GE (A1)  GE (D5)
 GE (D3)  4;Biol 22
 Biol 220 (B3)  GE (C1)
 GE (D4)  Elective
 Elective  PE: Kin 300 Aquatics (15 units)
 Combative  or APE: Kin 325 (16 units)
   or AT: Kin 341 (16 units)

Upper-Division Specialization

Junior Year

 Fall Semester  Spring Semester
 Kin 330A  Kin 360
 Kin 301  Kin 410
 Kin 315  
 GE UD (D1)  

Senior Year

 Fall Semester  Spring Semester
 Kin 305  GE UD (E)
 KIN 350  Kin 460
 GE UD (C3)  Nutrition

In addition to the upper-division specialization, choose one of the following options:

Physical Education

Junior Year

 Fall Semester (17 units)  Spring Semester (16 units)
 Kin 400  Kin 325
 Kin 300 (2)  Kin 300 (1)
 KIN 307  Kin 340/341
   KIN 320

Senior Year

 Fall Semester (15 units)  Spring Semester (14 units)
 Kin 300 (2)  Kin 300 (1)
 Kin 404  Kin 430 (1)

Summer Session Options


Kin 307
KIN 400
KIN 410

Adapted Physical Education

Junior Year

Fall Semester (15 units) Spring Semester (16 units) Kin 426 Kin 430 KIN 430C (1) Kin 340/341 Elective

Senior Year

 Fall Semester (17 units)  Spring Semester (16 units)
 EdSP 430  KIN 430C (1)
 KIN 425  Elective
 Kin 430C (1)  Elective

Athletic Training Junior Year

 Fall Semester (14 units)  Spring Semester (16 units)
 Kin 340  KIN 441
   KIN 444
   KIN 445
   KIN 430E (3)

Senior Year

 Fall Semester (17 units)  Spring Semester (16 units)
 Nurs 473  Kin 430E (3)
 Elective  Kin 443

Summer Session Options


Kin 410

Major Concentrations

Choose one of the required concentrations below to complete the major:


I. Adapted Physical Education Concentration (26)
II. Physical Education Concentration (26)
III. Exercise Science Concentration (24-26)
IV. Athletic Training Concentration (25)
V. Interdisciplinary Concentration (24)
 Total units in a concentration  24-26
 Total units in the major  50-52

Specific content of concentrations is detailed below.

Specific Content of Concentrations

Several options are available to a student advancing toward a specific goal in the degree program. A student may select a pattern of courses in any one of the following concentrations.

I. Adapted Physical Education Concentration

After completing the bachelor?s degree, students may pursue career opportunities in private or public agencies. In combination with the physical education concentration (Single Subject Credential), a student may meet the requirements for the specialist credential in adapted physical education.
 EDSP 430 Special Education for Teachers   4
 KIN 340/341 Athletic Injuries/Emergency Response  3
 KIN 300 Aquatics   1
 KIN 325 Adapted PE-I: Basic Concepts and Special Populations  3
 KIN 400 Elementary School Physical Education  3
 KIN 425 Seminar in Adapted PE  3
 KIN 426 Adapted PE-II: Assessment and Programming  3
 KIN 430C Field Experience in Adapted PE (min.)  3
 Additional approved elective  3
 Total units in the concentration  26
 Total units in the B.S.  52

II. Physical Education Concentration

The Kinesiology Department offers a Subject Matter Program in Physical Education. Students who are interested in teaching physical education and coaching in the schools may select this option. Completion of the program certifies the subject matter competence required for entry into a teaching credential program in physical education and exempts the student from taking the Praxis II Subject Assessment Examination. Kinesiology majors interested in seeking a general elementary credential may demonstrate subject matter competence by passing the Praxis II Multiple Subject Assessment for Teachers. For further information, contact the department office.
 KIN 300 Analysis of Motor Performance:  
 Aquatics  1
 Skills and Fitness Performance  1
 Dance and Rhythms  1
 Educational Gymnastics   1
 Racquet Sports  1
 Team Sports  1
 Contemporary Activities  1
  Combatives KIN 101   1
 KIN 307 Computer Applications in Physical Education  3
 KIN 320 Curriculum, Pedagogy and Assessment  3
 KIN 325 Adapted Physical Education I:Basic Concepts and Special Populations  3
 KIN 341 Athletic Injuries: Basic Studies  3
 KIN 400 Elementary School Physical Education  3
 KIN 404 Theory of Coaching  2
 KIN 430 Field Experience  1
 Total units in the concentration  26
 Total units in the major  52

For information on credentials and professional education requirements, please see the Education section in this catalog, which describe programs in education, and also the University?s special bulletin on Programs in Teacher Education.

Integrated Degree and Credential Program

Students in their freshmen year who are interested in becoming public school physical education teachers can enroll in a program of study that integrates a B.S. in Kinesiology with a concentration in Physical Education, with the requirements necessary to obtain a teaching credential. This plan of study merges the degree and credential courses, subsequently exposing students to public school teaching experiences from their freshmen through senior years. In addition, if students follow the designed advising plan, they have the potential of completing their course of study in less time than if the degree and credential programs were taken back to back. This program may necessitate students taking one or two summer school sessions.

Freshman Year

 Fall Semester (16 units)  Spring Semester (16 units)
 Chem 105 (B1) (4)  POLS 200 (D4) (3)
 ENGL 101 (A2) (3)  GE (D2) (3)
 Foreign Language (C4) (3)(if needed)  PHIL 101 or 102 (A3) (3)
 MATH 165 (B2) (4)   BIOL 115 w/out lab (B2) (3)
 KIN 120 (2)  KIN 101 (1)
   GE (C3) (3)

Sophomore Year

 Fall Semester (17 units)  Spring Semester (15 units)
 BIOL 220 (B3) (4)  KIN 300 (2)
 KIN 300 (1)  KIN 315 (3)
 KIN 320 (3)  KIN 341 (3)
 GE (A1, C2, D3) (9)  BIOL 224 (B3) (4)
 Have taken CBEST  GE (C3, D5) (3)
 Apply to Single-Subject Credential Program

Summer Session 9 units


EDUC 417 (3)
Foreign Language (if needed) (3)
KIN 307 (3)

Junior Year

 Fall Semester (18 units)  Spring Semester (16 units)
 Kin 301 (4)  Kin 300 (2)
 KIN 300 (1)  KIN 325 (3)
 KIN 350 (4)  KIN 360 (4)
 KIN 410 (3)  Nutrition (3)
 GE (C1, E) (6)  EDSS 442 (4)

Summer Session 6 units


KIN 400 (3)
EDSS 418 (3)

Senior Year

 Fall Semester (18 units)  Spring Semester (17 units)
 KIN 300 (1)  EDSS 458 (12)
 KIN 305 (4)  EDSS 459 (3)
 KIN 460 (3)  KIN 404 (2)
 EDSS 443A (1)  
 EDSS 443B (2)  
 EDSS 444 (3)  
 EDSS 446 (4)  

III. Exercise Science Concentration

Students who have an interest in adult fitness, biomechanics, exercise physiology, and pre-physical therapy may select this concentration. It contains lower-division and upper-division courses beyond the core required of all majors and a set of courses specific to the subspeciality within the concentration.

Lower-Division Exercise Science Core

 CHEM 105AB Elementary General/Organic Chemistry*   or
 CHEM 115AB/116AB General Chemistry*   8**
 PHYS 209/210 General Physics*  4**

Upper-Division Exercise Science Core

 KIN 340/341 Athletic Injuries or Emergency Response  3
 KIN 430/495 Field Experience/Special Studies  3
 Total in the exercise science core  18

* GE courses.
** Students planning to enter a master?s degree program in physical therapy may need to take additional units or courses to satisfy admission requirements to the programs. Check with the academic schools to which you plan to apply for specific requirements.

Areas of Emphasis in Exercise Science

Choose one of the following areas of emphasis to complete the exercise science concentration:


Adult Fitness Management
Biodynamics
Pre-Physical Therapy

Specific content of areas of emphasis is detailed below.

Adult Fitness Management Emphasis

 BUS 219 Introduction to Computer Applications in Management  or
 BUS 230A Principles of Accounting  3
 BIOL 318 Biology of Aging*  
 Total units in the concentration  24
 Total units in the major  50

Pre-Physical Therapy Option

 PSY 425 Abnormal Behavior  4
 BIOL elective related to physical therapy  4
 Total units in the concentration  26
 Total units in the major  52

Biodynamics Emphasis (choose one sequence below)

Biomechanics Sequence:

 MATH 161 Calculus  4*
 KIN 300 Analysis of Motor Performance  2

Exercise Physiology Sequence:

 CHEM 340 Biochemistry  3
 BIOL/GERN  3
 Total units in the concentration  24
 Total units in the major  52

* GE courses

IV. Athletic Training Concentration

Designed to prepare a student for the prevention, management and rehabilitation of injuries/illnesses to athletes at all levels of competition. This program meets all the National Athletic Trainer?s Association Internship Route academic course work requirements and 350 hours of the 1,500 hours of field work necessary to become a certified athletic trainer.
 NURS 473 Health Education and Drug Abuse  3
 KIN 340 Emergency Response  3
 KIN 341 Athletic Injuries: Basic Studies  3
 KIN 430E Field Experience in Athletic Training (Min. 350 hours; note: 1,500 hours required for NATA certification.)  6
 KIN 441 Athletic Injuries: Advanced Studies  3
 KIN 443 Therapeutic Modalities and Rehabilitation Techniques  3
 KIN 444 Prevention, Evaluation, Disposition of Athletic Injuries  2
 KIN 445 Organization and Administration of an Athletic Training Program  2
 Total units in the concentration  25
 Total units in the major  50

V. Interdisciplinary Concentration

In consultation with their advisors, students design a concentrated course of study or special emphasis track in preparation for a career goal. Areas of emphasis may include sport psychology, sports communication, sport art, sports management, community recreation and others.

Students, in consultation with their advisors, shall select a minimum of 24 units to complete the program requirements. Courses in kinesiology and those offered by other departments are appropriate and may be applied to this track. A minimum of 3 units, and not more than 6 units, in Field Experience (KIN 430) and/or Special Studies (KIN 495) must be taken. The proposed study list must be signed by the student and advisor and submitted to the department chair for approval. A copy of the signed, approved study list is placed in the student?s advising folder.
 Total units in the concentration  24
 Total units in the major  50

Minor in Kinesiology

Students majoring in other disciplines may complete a minor in kinesiology to further their career goals. The minor requires a minimum of 22 units and includes a core of 12 to 13 units (required of all students) and a minimum of 9 to 10 units of electives. The minor in kinesiology may be desirable for credential candidates pursuing a second teaching area or a career in coaching, for management students entering sport/fitness businesses, for environmentalists involved in outdoor recreation programs, for students in performing arts desiring a physical education/dance background. Students pursuing a kinesiology minor must consult with a departmental advisor for program requirements.

Minor Core Requirements

 KIN 330A Measurement and Evaluation  1
Choose one course from the following:
 KIN 301 History and Philosophy of Human Movement (4) or  
 KIN 315  Sociology of Sport (3) or
 KIN 410 Lifespan Motor Development  3
Choose two courses from the following:
 KIN 305 Psychological Bases of Human Movement (4)
KIN 350 Biomechanics (4)
 
 KIN 360 Physiology of Exercise (4)  8
 Total units in the minor core  12-13

Minor Options

These courses are to be determined with and approved by a departmental advisor. They must be in kinesiology and may include a maximum of 3 units of field work and/or special studies.
 Total units in the minor option  9-10
 Total units in the minor  22

Master of Arts in Kinesiology

The goal of the Master of Arts degree program is to provide increased understanding of the body of knowledge in kinesiology that is based on the biological, sociological, biomechanical, and psychological influences on human performance. For additional information, please see the department's web site.

M.A. Core Requirements

 KIN 500 Introduction to Research  3
 KIN 505 Sem: Psychological Bases of Human Movement  3
 KIN 550 Seminar in Biomechanics  3
 KIN 560 Advanced Physiology of Exercise  3
 KIN 590 Graduate Seminar  3
 KIN 599 Thesis/Project  3
 Total units in the M.A. core  18

M.A. Electives

In consultation with an advisor, select an additional 12-unit study plan. As an example of a study plan, a student who wishes to pursue the adult fitness program will select electives from the following list:
BIOL 380 Nutrition (4)
SOCI 319 Gerontology (4)
BUS 342 Training and Development (3)
GERN 408 Transitions in Adult Development (4)
KIN 410 Life Span Motor Development (3)
KIN 595 Special Studies (3)

Other plans may be established in consultation with the department graduate coordinator and the thesis advisor.
 Total units in M.A. electives  12
 Total units in the M.A. degree  30

The Department of Kinesiology offers the M.A. in kinesiology via the thesis or project option, requiring an original investigative thesis or an equivalent project.

Admission Procedures

Students must apply to the University through the Office of Admissions and Records, and must complete a separate application to the Kinesiology Department. Students may be admitted as conditionally classified or classified graduate students. The procedures for each are as follows:

Conditionally Classified Graduate

Application for students interested in pursuing a master?s degree in kinesiology will be forwarded to the department for consideration. The student must submit, along with the application to the Office of Admissions, transcripts of all college work. These should show a bachelor?s degree or its equivalent and a grade point average of at least 3.00 for the last 60 units of work attempted. Students who have degrees in other areas of study must make up deficiencies in undergraduate areas: descriptive statistics, biomechanics, psychological basis of human movement, physiology of exercise. Only one (up to 4 units) of these courses may be counted toward the M.A. degree. Completion of WEPT required.

Classified Graduate

Classified graduate students are those who have completed all admission requirements and undergraduate course work and have been admitted to the University and the master?s degree program in the Department of Kinesiology.

Application to the department must include two letters of recommendation from individuals familiar with the applicant?s academic work and a detailed personal statement indicating the applicant?s academic and professional interests and goals.

Please see the Degree Requirements section in this catalog for post-baccalaureate degree requirements.

The graduate coordinator serves as advisor to all conditionally classified graduate students until the students select a major advisor and advance to classified graduate status.

Advancement to Candidacy for the M.A. Degree

The Advancement to Candidacy form (GSO1) describes the culminating project and verifies that the student has met the Writing Proficiency Requirement. This form must be approved by all members of the student?s project committee and the department graduate coordinator before being forwarded to the Associate Vice President for Academic Programs. At completion of all coursework and the culminating project, the GS02 form is approved by the department and forwarded to the Associate Vice President for final review and approval prior to granting of the M.A. degree.

Kinesiology Courses (KIN)

Classes are offered in the semesters indicated. Please see the Schedule of Classes for most current information and faculty teaching assignments.

101 Physical Education Activities (1) Fall, Spring

Activities classes. Classes are conducted in the following activities: aquatics (swimming, physical conditioning swimming, water polo and scuba). Individual sports (adapted activities, martial arts, tennis). Fitness (aerobics, conditioning, pilates, jogging/running and weight training). Dance (recreational, yoga). Outdoor activities. Team sports (basketball, soccer, softball, volleyball). Course offerings vary from semester to semester.

Most sections meet twice weekly, with some sections meeting at specially arranged times according to the nature of the activity. Students may take, for credit, as many different 101 classes as desired. The same 101 activity class may be repeated once for credit. Cr/NC only.

120 Motor Skill Development in Public Schools (2) Fall

Prepares students to teach motor skills to school-aged children. Topics including motor development, motor learning and instructional design as related to motor skill acquisition are introduced. Students task analyze a variety of motor activities, plan developmentally appropriate lessons, and teach peer and public school-aged children in local schools.

230 Introduction to Field Experience (1-2) Fall, Spring

Provides lower-division students an opportunity to sample work experiences in a variety of settings in physical education, adapted physical education, athletic training, or exercise science. Thirty hours of supervised field work for each unit of credit. This course does not meet the field work requirement in the kinesiology major concentrations. Prerequisites: Overall 2.0 GPA and departmental approval.

300 Analysis of Motor Performance (1)


Fall: Team Sports, Racquet Sports, Educational Gymnastics, Skills and Fitness for Motor Performance
Spring: Aquatics, Dance and Rhythms, Contemporary Activities

Lecture, activity laboratory. A series of 1-unit courses. Each course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the mechanics of the neuromuscular skills and functional application of the activities presented within the course. In addition, students will be involved in task analyzing and teaching skills/activities contained within each course.

301 History and Philosophy of Human Movement (4) / Fall, Spring

An introduction to significant historical and philosophical considerations in the development of human movement. Contemporary philosophical issues as well as active physical participation with an experiential emphasis will be studied. Prerequisite: ENGL 101, upper-division standing and consent of instructor for nonkinesiology majors.

305 Psychological Bases of Human Movement (4) Fall, Spring

Introduction to psychological factors influencing learning and performing motor skills and the psycho-social influences of sport, exercise and physical activity on the developing individual. Emphasis will be on the application of current motor learning, sport and exercise psychology theories on such topics as learning, motivation, goal setting, stress, anxiety, group dynamics, leadership, moral development, and exercise adherence.

307 Computer Applications in Physical Education (3) / Fall, Spring

Provides students with information on, training in, and experiences with various information technology methods and applications related to Physical Education. Two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory activity per week. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.

311 Selected Topics (1-4)

Selected upper-division courses that are taught on a one-time basis.

315 Sociology of Sport (3) / Fall, Spring

Examines and utilizes basic sociological concepts and demonstrates their manifestations in the teaching of physical education and sports. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. Priority given to Kinesiology majors.

320 Curriculum, Pedagogy and Assessment (3) Fall, Spring

This course is designed to explore different styles of teaching, management strategies, and assessment techniques used in physical education. Effective teaching characteristics will be discussed and opportunities given for students to put these into practice. Prerequisite: KIN 300 (3 courses) or consent of instructor.

325 Adapted Physical Education I: Basic Concepts and Special Populations (3)/ Fall, Spring

An introduction to adapted physical education?common definitions, scope and basic concepts; a study of selected disabilities, with a primary focus on identification, etiology and implications for physical education. Course includes 18 hours of practical experience in the field.

330A Measurement and Evaluation (1) Fall, Spring

A survey of descriptive statistics. Includes measures of central tendency, variability, scale scores, correlation and graphing with applications in kinesiology. Meets first half of the semester. Required for all kinesiology majors. Prerequisite: GE math.

340 Emergency Response (3) / Fall

Study of the principles and practical applications of advanced first aid techniques required to provide the initial emergency care necessary to sustain life and to maintain life support until the victims of accidents or sudden illness are cared for by qualified medical personnel.

341 Athletic Injuries: Basic Studies (3) / Fall, Spring

Lecture, laboratory. Designed to show students the proper methods of recognition, evaluation, and treatment of athletic injuries to the upper and lower extremities. Comprehension of anatomy, mechanism-of-injury, and pathology are stressed. Fee of $10 required for this course. Prerequisite: BIOL 220.

350 Biomechanics (4) / Fall, Spring

Lecture, laboratory. Presents the quantitative and qualitative analysis of human movement and the anatomic concepts needed for understanding human movement in relation to mechanical effects such as application of force in relation to center of mass, displacement, velocity, acceleration of bodies, and buoyancy. Emphasis is on understanding and application of principles to any movement pattern. Prerequisites: BIOL 220 and GE math.

360 Physiology of Exercise (4) / Fall, Spring

Lecture, laboratory. Study of the acute and chronic effects of human activity and exercise. Laboratory and field experiences in selected areas, including exercise metabolism, skeletal muscle and cardiopulmonary physiology, body composition estimation, and nutrition as they pertain to clinical, fitness, and sports settings. Prerequisites: GE math; BIOL 115 and BIOL 224.

371-377 Varsity Intercollegiate Sports for Men (2) Fall, Spring

Activities include: soccer, tennis, basketball, and baseball. May be repeated for credit.

381-387 Varsity Intercollegiate Sports for Women (2) Fall, Spring

Activities include: cross country, track and field, soccer, volleyball, tennis, basketball, and softball. May be repeated for credit.

400 Elementary School Physical Education (3) Fall, Spring, Summer

An introduction to and practice in applying the concepts and principles of developmentally appropriate physical education for children. Prerequisite: upper-division majors in kinesiology or multiple-subject credential candidates or consent of instructor.

404 Theory of Coaching (2) / Fall, Spring

A survey of issues encountered by coaches in all sports. Topics will include, but not be limited to communication with players, colleagues and administration, ethical issues and responsibilities, coaching philosophies, relations with media and community, time management, coach and athlete motivation, mental training skills, and equipment and facilities management. Upper-division standing.

410 Lifespan Motor Development (3) Fall, Spring, Summer

Survey of the development of perceptual-motor function from birth through aging, with emphasis on gross motor performance.

425 Seminar in Adapted Physical Education (3) Fall, Odd years

Exploration and discussion of current research and professional issues in the field of adapted physical activity. Prerequisite: KIN 325 or equivalent. Corequisite: 1 unit KIN 430C.

426 Adapted Physical Education II: Assessment and Programming (3) / Fall, even years

Selection, administration, and interpretation of motor assessment instruments. Planning and developing appropriate activities and programs to meet individual needs in basic skills, movement exploration, dance, games, sports, aquatics, physical and motor fitness, and relaxation. Prerequisites: KIN 325, 330AB and 410 or consent of instructor. Corequisite: 1 unit KIN 430C.

430A Field Experience in Physical Education (1-3) Fall, Spring

Provides upper-division kinesiology majors experiences in coaching or teaching in public or private organizations. Course requirements include a work journal, development of a personal portfolio, and verification of completion by immediate supervisor. Prerequisites: completion of 10 units in physical education concentration related to specific field experience; C average in major and support courses.

430C Field Experience in Adapted Physical Education (1-3) / Fall, Spring

Provides upper-division kinesiology majors specializing in adapted physical education an opportunity to work with individuals with disabilities in school or other settings. Course requirements include a daily journal, development of a personal portfolio, and verification of completion by immediate supervisor. KIN 425 and 426 each require 1 unit of KIN 430C as a corequisite. Prerequisites: KIN 325; C average in major and support courses.

430D Field Experience in Exercise Science (1-3)

Provides qualified upper-division students an opportunity to gain experience in either applied exercise physiology, biomechanics, or physical therapy. Course requirements include the development of a personal portfolio, a log of completed hours, a daily journal describing experiences, and verification of completion by immediate supervisor. Prerequisites: completion of a minimum of three support and/or core courses related to the field experience; C average in major and support courses.

430E Field Experience in Athletic Training (1-4) Fall, Spring

Provides qualified upper-division students an opportunity to gain experience with intercollegiate athletic programs in the practice of athletic training skills. Course requirements include: development of a personal portfolio, completion of internship hours with athletic programs, and completion of a list of delineated athletic training motor-skill competencies. Corequisites: KIN 341; C average in major and support courses.

441 Athletic Injuries: Advanced Studies (3) Spring, even years

Designed to show students the proper methods of recognition, evaluation and treatment of injuries of the head, trunk, and spine. Comprehension of anatomy, mechanism-of-injury, and pathology are stressed. Prerequisites: KIN 340 and 341.

443 Therapeutic Modalities and Rehabilitation Techniques (3) Spring, odd years

Lecture, laboratory. A study of the theoretical basis of therapeutic rehabilitation design and different techniques of therapeutic exercise, care, and manual treatment. The physics/mechanics and utilization of therapeutic modalities are also studied. Prerequisite: KIN 341.

444 Prevention, Evaluation and Disposition of Athletic Injuries (2) / Spring, even years

Lecture, laboratory. Students learn the HIPS technique of evaluating athletic injuries; the prevention of athletic injuries; the disposition of athletic injuries; medical record-keeping with regard to athletic injuries. Prerequisite: KIN 441.

445 Organization and Administration of Athletic Training Programs (2) Spring, even years

Designed to introduce and practice techniques and skills related to the organization and administration of an athletic training program. This course is also designed to allow students to understand professional responsibilities, and avenues of professional development of an entry-level certified athletic trainer.

460 Conditioning for Performance and Health (3) Fall, Spring

A review of methods for the conditioning of a broad range of people from exercising adults through competitive athletes. Emphasis during the first half of the semester will be on topics related to adult fitness, including cardiorespiratory fitness, resistive training, flexibility, weight management, and exercise for special populations. During the second half of the semester topics related to athletes will include endurance training, training for strength and power, nutritional considerations for athletes, and the use of various putative ergogenic aids. Prerequisite: KIN 360.

495 Special Studies in Physical Education (1-4) Fall, Spring

Includes completion of a project designed to meet a specialized advanced study need. The student should have prerequisite skills. The project should be planned and described in writing, in consultation with and with the consent of the faculty advisor. There are four areas of study: 495A Special Studies in Physical Education; 495C Special Studies in Adapted PE; 495D Special Studies in Exercise Science; and 495E Special Studies in Athletic Training.

497 Selected Topics in Kinesiology (1-4)

A single topic or set of related topics not ordinarily covered by the kinesiology major curriculum. May be repeated for credit with a different topic.

Graduate Courses

500 Introduction to Research (3) / Fall

Study of research methodology appropriate in kinesiology and related fields. Designing, conducting, and interpreting analytical, descriptive, experimental and qualitative research is included. The student is introduced to statistical analysis and interpretation of data and to computer applications in personal research. Prerequisites: KIN 330A or a course in descriptive statistics; an introductory course in computer science; and graduate standing.

505 Seminar in Psychological Bases of Human Movement (3) / Fall, odd years

A critical review of current literature regarding the psychological factors involved in the learning and performing of motor skills, as well as the influence of sport, exercise and physical activity on the developing individual over the lifespan. Prerequisite: KIN 305 or equivalent.

550 Seminar in Biomechanics (3) Spring, odd years

This course covers application of biomechanical analysis techniques to current problems in biomechanics such as gait analysis, sports techniques, and properties of materials and equipment. Emphasis is on computerized video-analysis technique. Each student completes a selected biomechanical video analysis project. Prerequisite: KIN 350 or equivalent.

560 Advanced Physiology of Exercise (3) Fall, even years

Review of topics related to the physiological responses to exercise. Topics include exercise metabolism, muscle and cardiovascular responses, as well as the role of exercise in the prevention and treatment of coronary artery disease, and estimation of body composition. Additional topics selected from the following: ergogenic aids, exercise responses at environmental extremes, nutrition designed to improve performance, graded exercise testing, and immune response to exercise. Prerequisite: KIN 360 or equivalent.

578 Project Continuation (1-3) / Fall, Spring

Designed for students working on their thesis or master?s project but who have otherwise completed all graduate coursework toward their degree. This course cannot be applied toward the minimum number of units needed for completion of the master?s degree. Prerequisite: permission of the graduate coordinator. Cr/NC only.

590 Graduate Seminar (3) / Spring

Individual research topics in kinesiology will be explored. The first part of the semester will be devoted to developing scientific writing techniques and refining the purpose and scope of proposed research. Development of the thesis proposal, section by section, will follow. Emphasis will be placed on peer review and attainment of a high degree of writing proficiency. Students are expected to complete their thesis research proposals during this semester. Prerequisites: KIN 500 and two of the following: KIN 505, 550, 560.

595 Special Studies (1-4) / Fall, Spring

Includes completion of a project to meet a highly specialized advanced study need. Project to be selected in conference with the faculty advisor and approved by the departmental Graduate Studies Committee. Prerequisites: consent of instructor and approval of departmental Graduate Studies Committee before the study is initiated.

599 Thesis Project (3) / Fall, Spring

The master?s thesis is based on laboratory and library research, with focus on a project central to the student?s concentration area. Prerequisites: KIN 590 and an authorized Advancement to Candidacy form.


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