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Nursing

Department Chair
Liz Close

Administrative Coordinator
Becky Cohen
Ana Mu–oz

Faculty
Liz Close, Gregory Crow, Sandra DeBella Bodley,
Carole Heath, Deborah (Klaas) Kindy, Jeanette Koshar,
Thomas Nolan, Wendy Smith

Bachelor of Science in Nursing Course Plan / RN Option (RN-BSN) / LVN Option (LVN-BSN) / Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) / Pathways Option, Family Nurse Practitioner Specialty Option, Accelerated FNP Option, Post-Master's Certificate Option / Leadership and Management:Administration, Case Management,and Education (ACME) / Individual Class Descriptions

Programs offered (fully accredited by the NLNAC)
Bachelor of Science in Nursing

Prelicensure BSN
RN-BSN
LVN-BSN

Master of Science in Nursing
Family Nurse Practitioner
Nursing Administration
Nursing Case Management
Nursing Education

Post-Master's Certificates
Family Nurse Practitioner


The purpose of nursing is to provide humanistic care to maintain and enhance the health of individuals and of society as a whole. To accomplish these goals, nurses assume several roles, including caregiver, communicator, client advocate, teacher, leader and consumer of research. In keeping with the SSU philosophy, the Department of Nursing has developed an overarching concept that sincere, compassionate, humane care is essential in the delivery of professional nursing.

The Department of Nursing is strongly committed to providing multiple opportunities for learning using a variety of technology mediated techniques. Courses at both the undergraduate and graduate levels may be taught using televideo conferencing technology for distance learning, interactive and real-time electronic communications via computer for small group and seminar discussions, self-paced and self-directed independent study, and Internet tools that support lifelong intellectual and professional development.

The Department of Nursing enjoys a close relationship with the health care services community within its service area and beyond. Consequently, there are many clinical opportunities available. Students have a variety of community-based placements in hospitals and other health care agencies. Graduates of both the baccalaureate and master programs are well prepared for careers in a variety of health care settings in the community.

Sonoma State University's nursing programs are approved by the California State Board of Registered Nursing and accredited by the National League for Nursing Accreditation Commission, from which information about tuition, fees and length of program may be obtained, either in writing or by telephone at National League for Nursing, 350 Hudson Street, New York, NY, 10014, 212 989-9393.

Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN)

The undergraduate nursing program provides three options to obtain a baccalaureate degree in nursing:
1. A prelicensure program option that prepares students to become licensed registered nurses.
2. An RN to BSN two-year program option for licensed RNs with Associate degrees or the equivalent.
3. An LVN to BSN program option for licensed LVNs.

All graduates of the baccalaureate program are prepared to plan and provide patient care, to teach patients, families and staff, and to provide leadership in the delivery of health care services. The Bachelor of Science in Nursing program offers students an opportunity to become liberally educated professionals, qualified for certification as public health nurses, and completely prepared for graduate education in nursing. The prelicensure and LVN-BSN options also prepare the graduate for the RN licensure examination.

Eligible applicants should contact the nursing department for further information.

Prelicensure Option

The pre-licensure option consists of two components: the pre-nursing curriculum, in which the student takes the prerequisite courses for the nursing program; and the pre-licensure curriculum, in which the student is admitted on a competitive basis to take the courses required for RN licensure and complete the Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree. The pre-nursing courses may be taken at either Sonoma State University or another university or junior college. Students who complete their prerequisites at Sonoma State University will be considered first for admission to the nursing major, but are not guaranteed entrance. For admission to the pre-licensure component of the program, a supplemental application must be submitted to the Nursing Department between November 1 and February 28. Applications are available on the department's web site at www.sonoma.edu or by contacting the Nursing Department.

Admission Criteria

Admission to Pre-Nursing Status (for prelicensure option)

Students applying directly from high school must meet the following criteria:
1. Standard SSU admission criteria.
2. High school chemistry/biology with a GPA of 3.00 (B) or better.

Community college transfer students must meet the following criteria:
1. Standard SSU transfer criteria.
2. B average in nursing prerequisite science courses.

Admission to the Nursing Major (for prelicensure option)
(final three years of degree program)

Nursing is an impacted program and therefore requires supplemental application in addition to application to Sonoma State University. Students applying to the nursing program must submit:
1. GPA of 3.00 or better in prerequisite science courses: BIOL 220, 218, 224 and CHEM 105A/B or equivalent.
2. Health care experience (written verification of at least 50 hours).
3. Essay (criteria available in the Department of Nursing).
4. Recommendations (forms available in the Department of Nursing).
Requirements for the Prelicensure BSN Option units
General education *48
Major requirements 58
Support courses 14
General electives 4
Total units needed for graduation 124

*3 units of Area E will be satisfied upon completion of the nursing major to meet 51 unit GE requirement.

Required Courses for the Prelicensure Option Bachelor of Science in Nursing

Pre-Nursing
BIOL 115 Introduction to Biology (can be challenged through AP or CLEP exam) (3)
BIOL 218 General Microbiology (4)
BIOL 220 Human Anatomy (4)
BIOL 224 Human Physiology (4)
CHEM 105A General and Inorganic Chemistry (can be challenged through AP or CLEP exam) (4)
CHEM 105B Organic and Biochemistry (4)

Year 1 Nursing Nursing major acceptance required from this point forward.
Fall Semester Spring Semester
NURS 200 (3) NURS 204 (3)
NURS 205 (3) NURS 206 (3)
NURS 207 (2) NURS 210B (4)
NURS 210A (4) plus GE and other
  degree requirements

Year 2 Nursing

Fall Semester Spring Semester
NURS 340 (3) NURS 380 (3)
NURS 342 (3) NURS 385 (3)
NURS 345 (4) NURS 400 (3)
PSY 302 (3) plus GE and other degree requirements
plus GE and other degree requirements  

Year 3 Nursing

Fall Semester Spring Semester
NURS 360 (3) NURS 425 (4)
NURS 405 (3) NURS 440 (3)
NURS 415 (1) Elective (3)
NURS 450 (3) plus GE and other degree requirements
plus GE and other degree requirements  

RN Option (RN-BSN)

Sonoma State University's baccalaureate program also offers a two-year upper-division option designed to articulate with two-year community college nursing programs. The SSU program provides upper-division education for registered nurses and enables nurses to expand their practice and function with greater independence in a variety of settings.

RNs who have attended a hospital (diploma) program should contact a community college with an RN program to obtain equivalent credit for their diploma program (30 ungraded lower-division nursing units) and to complete the community college's general education requirements for an A.A. degree.

Admission Criteria


1. Current California licensure as a Registered Nurse (Recent A.D.N. graduates who have not received California RN licensure but who otherwise meet program prerequisites will be accepted on a conditional basis pending state board results. Failure to pass state boards would disqualify the student from the nursing major - but not from the University - until such time as a passing score is obtained.)
2. Sixty semester units of college-transferable credit: 30 units should meet California State University general education requirements (including Areas A1 and B4); 30 units must be credit for lower-division nursing coursework.
3. Minimum of 3 semester units of college-transferable credit in general chemistry with a grade C or better.
4. Human anatomy/physiology within the past 10 years or direct clinical nursing experience within the past two years.
Requirements for the RN-BSN Option units
General education (40 units may be transferred from a community college or university) *48

Major Requirements

Lower division at community college or university 30
Upper division at SSU (includes 32 units undergraduate nursing) 40
General electives 6
Total units needed for graduation 124

*3 units of Area E will be satisfied upon completion of the nursing major to meet the 51 unit GE requirement.

Required Nursing Major Courses and Sample Two-Year Program for RN-BSN Option Bachelor of Science in Nursing

The sequence below is for full-time students. A part-time sequence that can be completed in six semesters is also available through the Nursing department.

Year 1

Fall Semester Spring Semester
NURS 305 (3) NURS 360 (3)
NURS 312 (3) NURS 400 (3)
NURS 315 (3) NURS 405 (3)
PSY 302 (3) plus GE and other degree requirements plus GE and other degree requirements

Year 2

Fall Semester Spring Semester
NURS 450 (3) NURS 425 (4)
NURS 415 (1) NURS 440 (3)
plus GE and other degree requirements plus GE and other degree requirements

LVN Option (LVN-BSN)

A program for licensed vocational nurses who wish to become registered nurses is provided on a space-available basis. There are two options:
1. The recommended option provides the graduate with preparation needed for taking the State Board of Registered Nursing exam, a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree and eligibility for public health certification. To enter the first option, an individual must complete the same prerequisites as those students who enter the prelicensure BSN program.
2. The second option includes only those nursing courses required for RN licensure and qualifies LVNs to take the Registered Nurse licensing examination, but does not earn a BSN. To enter the second option, an LVN must have completed 4 units of physiology and 4 units of microbiology with a grade of B or better. Contact the department for further details. Courses required for this option are indicated by * in the following sample program.
Requirements for the LVN-BSN Option units
General education (40 units may be transferred from a community college or university) *48
Major requirements (lower division at community college or university, including SSU)) 22
Upper division at SSU (includes 36 units undergrad nursing) 42
General electives (may include additional community college or university units up to maximum allowed) 12
Total units needed for graduation 124

*3 units of Area E will be satisfied upon completion of the nursing major.

Required Nursing Major Courses and Sample Two-Year Program for LVN-BSN Option

Bachelor of Science in Nursing

The following sequence is for full-time students. A part-time sequence that can be completed in six semesters is also available.

Year 1

Fall Semester Spring Semester
NURS 305 (3) NURS 380 (3)
NURS 312 (3)* NURS 385 (3)*
NURS 315 (3) NURS 400 (3)
PSY 302 (3) NURS 206 Theory (3)*
plus GE and other degree requirements NURS 495 Practicum (2)*
  plus GE and other degree requirements

Year 2

Fall Semester Spring Semester
NURS 360 (3) NURS 425 (4)*
NURS 405 (3) NURS 440 (3)*
NURS 415 (1)* plus GE and other degree requirements
NURS 450 (3)  
plus GE and other degree requirements  

* Courses required in the LVN to RN curriculum. Undergraduate Nursing Progression and Retention Should a student not attain a minimum grade of "C" (a "C-" is not acceptable) in a nursing major course, the student will not be permitted to continue in the nursing major. The student may petition the faculty to repeat the course. If approval is granted, the student must receive a grade of "C" or better in the course when repeated. If a minimum grade of "C" is not attained, the student will not be eligible to continue in, or graduate from, the BSN program.

Master of Science in Nursing (MSN)

The goal of the graduate curriculum is to provide an advanced professional education to nurses with a BSN. The graduate degree is designed to respond to society's needs for professional nurses who influence the structure of emerging patterns of health care practice and delivery. Specialization in an area of nursing practice or function enables graduates to contribute effectively to current and future societal health needs. Graduates assist in the development and refinement of nursing science by assuming advanced clinical roles and leadership roles within the profession and by participating in research and other scholarly activities.

The curriculum includes a core of instruction with an emphasis on theoretical and conceptual foundations of nursing practice, research, professional issues and leadership. One option offers specialization as a family nurse practitioner (FNP), with emphasis on advanced clinical primary care practice. A second option, nursing leadership and management, prepares nurses for executive leadership functions and responsibilities in current and emerging health care systems and includes speciality focus in nursing administration, case management, or education.

Application Procedures

The standard CSU application form is used (available from the SSU Office of Admissions and Records). In addition, applicants must:
1. Meet the minimum admissions requirements for the chosen option.
2. Submit a separate Nursing Department application form.
3. Submit three letters of recommendation (on departmental forms).
4. Complete an interview with the department.

Application packets are available from the Nursing Department. Applicants who have received their BSN from SSU also need to submit a standard CSU application and supplemental nursing application to apply for graduate standing.

Culminating Experience

Degree requirements include completing a culminating experience during the final semester of study. The experience provides an opportunity for the student to synthesize the major learning outcomes of the graduate program and the nursing specialty option. The student can choose from one of the three options:
1. Preparing a publishable paper based on research or clinical practice;
2. Completing a directed project; or
3. Completing a comprehensive simulated exam.

Pathways Option (for nurses with a Bachelor's Degree in a discipline other than Nursing)

Application to the Department of Nursing's Master of Science program requires the foundation and skills equivalent to a Bachelor of Science degree in nursing. For those registered nurses who hold a baccalaureate degree in a field other than nursing, the department offers a Pathways Option that provides the student an individualized plan of study in preparation for application to the master's program, taking into account the student's background and chosen master's option (family nurse practitioner or leadership and management).

Pathways Program Admissions Procedure: In addition to the standard California State University application, Pathways application materials include 1) application form with goals essay, 2) transcripts, 3) recommendations, 4) resume listing work and educational experiences, and 5) an interview with the department. For forms and directions, contact the Nursing Department.

Admission Status: Initial status will be "conditionally classified" while the student is fulfilling requirements for BSN equivalency and other graduate admissions criteria. Completion of the Pathways option permits the student to be considered in the applicant pool. It does not guarantee admission to the graduate nursing program.

Family Nurse Practitioner
Specialty Option

The purpose of the family nurse practitioner specialty option is to prepare registered nurses with a bachelor's degree in nursing for advanced clinical practice with an emphasis on promoting individual and family wellness. The FNP concentration focuses upon the theoretical and scientific bases for the diagnosis and management of common illness, as well as health teaching, counseling and preventive services. Emphasis is placed upon advanced clinical skills that include history-taking, physical examination, health screening, management of common illness, and techniques of prevention and risk reduction.

In addition, an understanding of the economic and ethical factors affecting health care delivery provides nurses with unique capabilities to respond to society's complex needs. The ability to critically evaluate and apply research to the clinical setting is included as an important dimension of advanced professional practice.

Admissions Requirements

1. BSN degree (RNs with a bachelor's in an area other than nursing, please see section on Pathways program).

2. GPA of 3.00 in the last two years (60 units) of undergraduate or post-graduate study.

3. Current California licensure as a registered nurse.

4. The Graduate Record Examination.

5. Completion of courses in statistics and physiology/pathophysiology within the last seven years; completion of a physical assessment course within the last three years (students may challenge the physiology requirement by taking the NLN test).

6. Completion of course(s) in community health nursing.

7. Two years full-time experience as an RN preferred.

Curriculum Features

Students have a three-semester clinical preceptorship with a primary care provider. Students and faculty share responsibility for finding an acceptable preceptor. Content includes health needs and risks of all family members, family theories, and legal and professional issues pertinent to nurse practitioners. Content taken concurrently with the clinical sequences includes health risk assessment of individuals and families, pathophysiological concepts in diagnosis and treatment of common illness, pharmacology, and practice issues pertinent to nurse practitioners.

Students take courses in health economics and ethics of health care. Students complete a culminating experience that serves as evidence of successful integration of the diverse content areas in the curriculum.

The SSU family nurse practitioner specialty option meets criteria specified in Section 1484, Title 16, of the California Administrative Code and is approved by the California State Board of Registered Nursing.

Accelerated FNP Option

Registered Nurses with a B.S. in another field and who are nurse practitioners may progress more rapidly through the program using a series of challenge examinations. A maximum of 12 semester units from prior course work and challenge examinations may be counted toward the M.S. degree. A total of 28 units must be taken in residence at SSU. Students are evaluated individually to determine which courses have been met by prior course work and which courses may be challenged. By using this option, it is possible for eligible students to receive credit for some of the didactic courses and for most of the clinical experience required for FNP preparation.

Post-Master's Certificate Option

The Certificate Option is a 31-unit course of study designed for registered nurses who hold a master's degree in nursing who wish to become family nurse practitioners. Application is through the Department of Nursing.

Curriculum for full-time Progression for Master of Science in Nursing

Family Nurse Practitioner

Year 1

Fall Semester (13 units) Spring Semester (12 units)
NURS 501 (3) NURS 540B (4)
NURS 540 (2) NURS 550B (5)
NURS 549 (3) NURS 505 (3)
NURS 550A (2)  
NURS 552 (3)  

Year 2

Fall Semester (9 units) Spring Semester (6 units)
NURS 500A (3) NURS 500B (3)
NURS 504A (2) NURS 510 (3)
NURS 550C (4) Culminating Experience
Total units required 40

Leadership and Management:
Administration, Case Management and Education (ACME)

The curriculum for the three specialties within Leadership and Management (Nursing Administration, Case Management, and Education) prepares registered nurses to function as advanced practice nurses in a variety of roles and settings. Graduates will be prepared to lead and evaluate health care delivery systems and to provide educational support for evolving clinical practice. The Nursing Administration specialty prepares nurses to lead and manage all segments of health care organizations and systems. The Nursing Case Management specialty prepares systems level case managers to develop, implement, maintain, and evaluate systems of case management that meet the complex health care needs of patients, families, populations and communities. The Nursing Education specialty prepares educators to play a pivotal role in developing, implementing and evaluating educational programs that support contemporary and scientifically based nursing practice.

The curriculum emphasizes the application of theories and concepts of organization, leadership, management, financial management, case management and education as well as the use and application of research. The course of study provides for the development and application of knowledge relevant to the structure and financing of the health care system and the analysis of the interrelationships and interdependence of its various elements. Students learn to apply specialized knowledge and skills in selected areas of administration and case management in health care services in a variety of settings.

Admission Requirements
Nursing Administration, Case Management, and Education Specialty Options

1. B.S. degree (RNs with a bachelor's degree in an area other than nursing, please see section on Pathways program).

2. GPA of 3.00 in the last two years (60 units) of undergraduate or post-graduate study.

3. Current California licensure as a registered nurse.

4. The Graduate Record Examination.

5. Completion of statistics within the last seven years.

6. Completion of course(s) in community health nursing.

7. Demonstrated computer literacy and the ability to use common word processing software and forecasting software such as Excel. Students must have access to a computer that is online with an Internet provider supporting both e-mail and World Wide Web functions.

Curriculum

The Administration, Case Management, and Education specialties are managed in class cohorts. Students take an average of 8 units per semester. Courses are taught via the traditional classroom, teleconference and internet.

The first year focuses on the acquisition of a theoretical base in nursing theories, the health care delivery system, advanced practice issues and ethics. Students prepare a research proposal and conduct a research study.

The second year incorporates further knowledge in administration, case management, and education theories, financial management, quality management and human resources. Analysis and evaluation of organizational and management theories in relation to the provision of health care and nursing care delivery systems are undertaken. A two-semester residency program provides for applications of theoretical knowledge with a mentor in a health care agency selected by the student, in consultation with faculty. Students tailor their plan of study and select the focus for their residency based on their professional background and career goals.

Two-Year Program for Master of Science in Nursing

Nursing Leadership, Case Management, or Education

Year 1

Fall Semester (8 units) Spring Semester (9 units)
NURS 500A (3) NURS 500B (3)
NURS 504A (2) NURS 505 (3)
NURS 515A (3) NURS 515B (3)

Year 2

Fall Semester (6 units) Spring Semester (8 units)
NURS 506 (4) NURS 530A (4)* or
NURS 510 (2) NURS 532A** (4) or 522A*** (4)
  NURS 535A (4)

Year 3


Fall Semester (8 units)
NURS 530B (4)* or
NURS 532B (4)** or 522B*** (4)
NURS 535B (4)
Culminating Experience

*Administration students take these courses.
** Case Management students take these courses.
*** Education students take these courses.

Graduate Nursing Progression and Retention Students must attain a "B" or higher in all nursing graduate courses. If the student's GPA falls below 3.0 in nursing major courses, the student must petition the faculty to progress in the major. A student may repeat a graduate nursing course only once.

Nursing Courses (NURS)

Classes are offered in the semesters indicated. Please see the Schedule of Classes for most current information and faculty teaching assignments.

200 Nursing in Health and Illness (3) / Fall

Philosophical and theoretical foundations of nursing practice as a caring discipline. Basic physiological and psychosocial concepts of health and illness are explored from individual, family, and community perspectives, with an emphasis on health promotion and maintenance. Corequisites: NURS 205 and 210A. Prerequisite: acceptance to basic BSN program.

204 Nursing Care of the Adult (3) / Spring

Pathophysiology and physical assessment skills are integrated with basic medical surgical nursing concepts as the foundation for caring for the adult patient. Health and disease processes are studied as they apply to the clinical care of the adult patient. 2 unit theory and 1 unit lab.

205 Skills in Professional Nursing Practice (3) / Fall

Skills Lab: 7 hours. Introduces therapeutic communication skills, nursing process and clinical decision making, with an emphasis on person-centered assessment, diagnostic processes, and selected nursing therapies. Prerequisites: acceptance into basic BSN program; concurrent enrollment in NURS 200 and 210A.

206 Mental Health and Illness (3)

Concepts of psychopathology and nursing therapeutic communication are presented as the foundation for caring for clients in all clinical settings. 2 units theory, 1 unit lab.

207 Basic Pharmacology for Nurses (2) / Fall

Introduction to principles of pharmacology and to the nurse's role in the safe administration of medications. Content includes basic pharmacological principles, physiological actions, therapeutic and adverse effects of major drug classifications and routes of administration, basics of drug calculations, and patient education. Emphasis is placed on nursing responsibilities with safe administration of medications. Prerequisite: admission to basic BSN program. Corequisites: NURS 200, 205 and 210A.

210A Clinical Practicum I (4) / Fall

Clinical Practicum. Applies theoretical principles of nursing care to individuals in ambulatory and nonacute health care settings. Clinical experience emphasizes health promotion and maintenance. Prerequisite: acceptance to basic BSN program. Corequisites: NURS 200, 205 and malpractice insurance.

210B Clinical Practicum II (4) / Spring

Applies theoretical principles of nursing care to individuals in acute care and psychiatric health care settings. Emphasis is on providing care to persons experiencing changes in health and illness. Prerequisites: NURS 200, 205, 210A. Corequisite: NURS 204, 206 and malpractice insurance.

305 Assessment and Clinical Decision Making (3) Fall, Summer

Lecture/discussion, 3 hours; lab, 3 hours. Concepts and skills of human health assessment basic to clinical decision making within the caring process are expanded. Interview skills focus on eliciting an accurate and thorough history, taking into account multiple dimensions that characterize the person. Examination skills are further developed to provide a database for nursing diagnosis and planning nursing care. Laboratory fee payable at time of registration. Prerequisite: acceptance to RN-BSN program; concurrent enrollment in NURS 315.

312 Introduction to Professional Nursing (3) / Fall

Provides introduction to RN-BSN program. The relationship between personal and professional development is explored with emphasis on student self-assessment, including clinical background, critical thinking, computer literacy, communication and self-care. This course also explores the relationship between communication, health, and the responsibility of the nurse to create positive environments that promote health and healing. Prerequisites: acceptance into the RN-BSN program; concurrent enrollment in NURS 350.

315 Advanced Pathophysiology (3) / Fall

Lecture/discussion, 3 hours. Examines selected human responses to actual or potential health problems seen across many patient/client populations. Physiological and pathophysiological processes are emphasized and integrated within a discussion of the multiple dimensions of human responses. Research and theory on which to base clinical assessments and nursing diagnoses are presented. Prerequisite: acceptance to RN-BSN program; concurrent enrollment in NURS 305.

340 Women's Health in the Expanding Family (3) Fall

Lecture. Principles and concepts of health and illness in childbearing and child-rearing families. Preventive and therapeutic aspects of nursing care for the pregnant and post-partum client. Use of community resources introduced. Prerequisites: all 200-level nursing major courses; concurrent enrollment in NURS 342 and 345.

342 Child Health in the Expanding Family (3) Fall

Lecture. Principles and concepts of health and illness in childbearing and child-rearing families. Preventive and therapeutic aspects of nursing care of the infant, child, and adolescent are emphasized. Use of community resources introduced. Prerequisites: all 200-level nursing courses; concurrent enrollment in NURS 340 and 345.

345 Clinical Practicum with Expanding Families (4) Fall

Applies the caring process to child-bearing and child-rearing families. Clinical experiences focus on principles and concepts of health promotion and maintenance to families in various phases of the health and illness continuum. Prerequisite: all 200-level nursing major courses. Corequisite: NURS 340 and 350. Malpractice insurance required.

360 Community Health Nursing Theory (3) Fall, Spring

Lecture/discussion, 3 hours. Introduces concepts, theories and research related to community responses and aggregate health, and concepts of population-based community health nursing practice. Communication and leadership skills applicable to population-based practice are developed and applied. National and international responses to health care problems and issues are examined, with an emphasis on intersectoral partnerships. Prerequisite: NURS 350.

380 Care of Individuals and Families with Complex Needs (3) / Spring

Lecture, Discussion, 3 hours. Applies the caring process to individuals and families with complex health care needs, emphasizing care of older adults. Prerequisite: NURS 340, 342 and 345. Corequisite: NURS 385.

385 Clinical Practicum in Care of Individuals and Families with Complex Needs (3) / Spring

Clinical Practicum with individuals and families with complex health care needs, emphasizing care of older adults. Clinical experience originates in acute care settings and includes discharge planning. Prerequisites: concurrent enrollment in NURS 380.

395 Community Involvement Program (1-4)

CIP involves students in community problems related to the promotion of health and the prevention of illness. Credit may be given for such activities as volunteer work in health agencies and planning and participating in community health projects. A total of 6 units may be applied toward a degree. May be taken by petition only. Prerequisites: admission to the nursing major, consent of advisor and department chair.

396 Selected Topics in Nursing (1-5)

A single topic or set of related topics not ordinarily covered by the nursing major curriculum (e.g., sexuality, death and dying, health planning and policy). The course may be repeated for credit with different topics, to a maximum of 12 units. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

400 Research and Ways of Knowing in Nursing (3) Spring

Lecture/discussion, 3 hours. Examines the nature of inquiry, basic research concepts, language and processes. Approaches to research and ways of knowing in nursing and related sciences are explored. Qualitative and quantitative research methods are compared. Students critically appraise and interpret studies in order to enhance their understanding of the research process. Prerequisites: NURS 312 and 350, and completion of GE category A3. Corequisite: NURS 360.

405 Community Health Nursing Practicum (3) Fall, Spring

Clinical practice, 9 hours. Utilizing concepts, theories, and research findings related to family and community health, students provide nursing care to individuals and families in community settings. Focus is on the application of the caring process to individuals and families. Professional development, leadership, and case management abilities are expanded through community nursing practice. Prerequisites: NURS 360 and 385.

415 Theory in Nursing Practice (1) / Fall

Theories and concepts from nursing and related sciences are applied to a selected client population in a clinical setting. A learning contract is developed by each student in a selected area of nursing practice that includes client care, research and theory, legal and ethical issues, standards of practice, and leadership and management in the clinical setting. All learning activities are designed within the context of caring to enhance critical thinking, client advocacy, therapeutic interventions, professional communication, and professional role development. Students must expect to complete NURS 425 Senior Clinical Study within the next two semesters.

425 Senior Clinical Study (4) / Fall, Spring

Clinical application of theories and concepts from nursing and related sciences in the nursing care of selected populations, research-based knowledge and pertinent theoretical frameworks are utilized to respond to complex and specific health care needs of these populations. Integration and synthesis of concepts, personal development and leadership/management abilities are expanded through professional nursing practice. Prerequisite: NURS 440 within past two semesters.

440 Nursing Leadership and Management (3) Spring

Lecture/discussion, 3 hours. Formulates a theoretical foundation for the process of nursing leadership and management. Attitudes and behavioral principles of effective leadership are developed and applied. Problem-solving strategies are developed as management problems are analyzed. Effects of the management process on patterns of health care practice and delivery are critically evaluated. Prerequisite: completion of all 300-level course work.

450 Nursing in a Sociopolitical Environment (3) Fall

Seminar, 3 hours. The purpose of this course is to explore historical and current sociopolitical issues in nursing and health care for their impact on the practice and profession of nursing. Issues are analyzed within a social, political, ethical, legal and cultural perspective. Professional accountability and effective sociopolitical advocacy are emphasized. Prerequisite: completion of all 300-level course work.

473 Health Education and Drug Abuse (3) Fall, Spring

Lecture, 3 hour. Emphasizes the teacher's responsibility for health promotion. Focus is on health issues affecting the school child's growth and maturation, and curriculum development for translating health knowledge into desirable health behavior. Includes units on nutrition, drug use and abuse, and AIDS. Course fulfills health education and drug abuse requirements of the Ryan Act Credential; enrollment priority is given to students in the Ryan Credential program. Prerequisite: upper-division standing.

480 Health, Sexuality and Society (3) / Fall, Spring

Examines issues in human sexuality as they relate to the health and well-being of self and others. The range of human sexual response will be explored. The impact of illness, disability and social dysfunction on one's sexuality will be analyzed. Satisfies GE, category E. Open to non-nursing majors. Prerequisite: upper-division standing.

495 Special Studies (1-4) / Fall, Spring

Individual or group study, under guidance of an advisor, of special problems in nursing. Prerequisites: admission to the nursing major and/or consent of instructor and department chair. Specific guidelines available from the nursing department.

500A Scholarly Inquiry (3)/ Fall

This course builds upon an undergraduate foundation in nursing and related theories and research. The linkage between theory, research, and advanced practice are further developed to provide the student with the necessary skills to critically analyze selected research projects. Application to advanced patient care, health care systems management and leadership, nursing case management and nursing education. The course relies heavily on the use of the Internet.

500B Scholarly Inquiry (3) / Spring

This course builds upon an undergraduate foundation in nursing and related theories and research. The linkage between theory, research and advanced practice are further developed to provide the student with the necessary skills to critically analyze selected research projects. Application to advanced patient care, health care systems management and leadership, nursing case management and nursing education. The course relies heavily on the use of the Internet.

501 Assessment and Maintenance of the Well Family (3) / Fall

Lecture/discussion, 3 hours. Expands the student's ability to identify and promote behaviors that enhance the health of self, individuals, and families. Principles from epidemiology, family health, psychology, sociology, change theory, and related therapies. Focuses on rapid identification of physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual health risks and modification of those risks as part of primary care. Prerequisites: acceptance to the family nurse practitioner program.

504 Policy and Politics of Health Care (2) / Fall

Lecture, 2 hours. Course reviews the principal ways health care is organized and financed, and identifies current issues in health care organization and financing. Analytic perspectives on health and health care economics are emphasized. Prerequisite: graduate nursing student or consent of instructor.

505 Ethics in Healthcare (2-3)

Bioethics in healthcare is critically discussed from both a theoretical and practical viewpoint. Separate modules address various aspects of healthcare delivery related to clinical and administrative topics.

506 Systems Management in Healthcare (4)

Systems Management will utilize the systems theory in understanding organization behavior and change. The content of the course will include selected issues in organization environment, structure, culture, human resources, politics, and system leadership. The process of the course will focus on effecting organization change.

510 Professional Issues and Leadership (2-3)

Seminar, 2 hours. Current nursing issues in advanced practice and professionalism are examined from a leadership perspective. Focuses on expanding nursing power and influence in professional situations. Cultural perspectives in health care, and nursing as a subculture, are examined. Faculty and students collaborate in the identification of pertinent issues.

515A Financial Management in Health Care Organizations I (3)

Provides the student with theory and experience with the elements of budget development. The course is divided into segments: 1) pre-budget, 2) budget preparation and 3) monitoring variance. Students select a clinical site and mentor to provide clinical experience with budget preparation and monitoring.

515B Financial Management in Health Care Organizations II (3)

This is a continuation of NURS 515A and provides hands-on experience with budget control and variance.

522A Instructional Process in Higher Education I (4)

Seminar, 3 hours. Examination of curriculum formation, revision and evaluation. Theoretical and practical aspects of the instructional role in higher education are examined. Major theories of learning are critiqued. Teaching strategies are analyzed in relation to learning objectives. Students engage in individual and group projects in curriculum development and teaching methods. Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment in NURS 535A.

522B Instructional Process in Higher Education (4)

This course is a continuation of NURS 522A with incorporation of online and teleconference teaching skills and concepts into a course design and plan for implementation. Students will evaluate their online and teleconference teaching plans with respect to clearly delineated clinical or administrative learning outcomes and appropriate teaching models. Students will build well balanced and appropriately sequenced assignments and determine whether the technology tools they have selected will meet the learning objectives of the course they are designing. Current nursing research, curriculum and assessment with particular emphasis on the online and teleconference paradigm will be included. Prerequisite: NURS 522A and 535A, concurrent enrollment in NURS 535B.

530A Nursing Leadership Theory I (4) / Spring

Seminar, 4 hours. A course in which theories of organizations and management are analyzed in relation to health care and nursing care delivery systems. Emphasis will be placed on analyzing and evaluating the relationship between clinical nursing practice and organizational management. Organizations will be analyzed according to structure, functions and organizational behaviors. Prerequisites: concurrent enrollment in NURS 535A.

530B Nursing Leadership Theory II (4) / Fall

Seminar, 3 hours. Focus is on continuation and further development of a knowledge base relating to health care delivery systems and nursing service administration. Emphasis will be placed on complex aspects of the leadership/management processes, including use of human and financial resources and health policy development. Prerequisites: NURS 530A and NURS 535A, concurrent in NURS 535B.

532A Case Management Theory I (4) / Spring

Seminar, 4 hours. A course in which the theory of case management in relation to coordinating and evaluating client care is explored. Emphasis is placed on analyzing and evaluating the relationship between the provision of quality client care and organizational effectiveness. The interdependent role of the case manager is analyzed. Prerequisites: acceptance to Leadership and Case Management program; concurrent enrollment in NURS 535A.

532B Case Management Theory II (4) / Fall

Seminar, 3 hours. Focus is on continuation and further development of a knowledge base relating to health care delivery systems and the role of the case manager. Emphasis will be placed on complex aspects of the case management process, including human and financial resources and organizational, local, state and federal health policy development. Prerequisites: NURS 532A and NURS 535A; concurrent enrollment in NURS 535B.

535A Residency I (4) / Spring

Field Work. Focuses on the application of theoretical knowledge in a nursing leadership/management setting. The student gains an understanding of the relationship of administrative theory to administrative practice through the initiation of the project proposal designed in NURS 530A or 532A or 522A. Prerequisites: concurrent enrollment in NURS 530A or NURS 532A or 522A.

535B Residency II (4) / Fall

Fieldwork. Continued application of theoretical and conceptual knowledge in a nursing leadership/management setting. An understanding of the relationship of administrative theory to administrative practice is gained through the implementation and completion of the project, which is designed to improve administrative skills. Prerequisites: NURS 535A and, 530A or 532A; or 522A, and concurrent enrollment in NURS 530B or 532B or 522B.

540A Pathophysiological Concepts in Diagnosis and Treatment I (2) / Fall

Lecture/discussion, 2 hours. Develops a pathophysiological conceptual foundation for the diagnosis and management of common acute and chronic illnesses in advanced primary care nursing practice. Research and theory from various disciplines are used to evaluate unique interaction patterns of person and environment as a basis for selecting strategies to promote health and minimize the effects of illness. Emphasizes interdisciplinary aspects of primary health care through partnerships with patients as a basis for collaboration, consultation and referral. Prerequisite: acceptance to family nurse practitioner program.

540B Pathophysiological Concepts in Diagnosis and Treatment II (4) / Spring

Lecture/discussion, 4 hours. Further develops a foundation for the diagnosis and management of common, yet more complex, acute and chronic illness in advanced primary care nursing practice. Research and theory from various disciplines are used to evaluate unique interaction patterns of person and environment as a basis for selecting strategies to promote health and minimize the effects of illness. Continues to emphasize the interdisciplinary aspect of primary health care through partnerships with patients as a basis for collaboration, consultation, and referral. Prerequisite: NURS 540A.

549 Health Maintenance Practicum (3) / Fall, Spring

Laboratory, 6 hours. This first clinical course for FNP students includes health history skills and physical assessment evaluation of well clients. Emphasis is on health promotion, health risk appraisal, and developing comprehensive assessment skills. Laboratory fee payable at time of registration. Prerequisites: acceptance into family nurse practitioner program; concurrent enrollment in NURS 550A and previous or concurrent enrollment in NURS 501 and 540A.

550A FNP Preceptorship I (2) / Fall, Spring

Clinical preceptorship, 6 hours. Beginning clinical practice in primary care settings is implemented. Specialized knowledge and skills are utilized to assess physical, emotional, social, cultural, and spiritual needs of patients. Concepts from various disciplines are integrated to provide a framework for developing and applying strategies for health promotion and illness management. Begins to develop advanced nursing role identity as FNP. Prerequisites: concurrent enrollment in NURS 549; previous or concurrent enrollment in NURS 501, 540A and 552.

550B FNP Preceptorship II (5) / Fall, Spring

Clinical preceptorship, 9-12 hours. Continued implementation of clinical practice in primary care settings. Further develops and expands FNP clinical judgment and practice skills in family primary care. Research findings and theory-based knowledge are applied to formulating diagnoses and management plans. Personal and professional parameters of the nurse practitioner role are examined. Prerequisite: NURS 550A.

550C FNP Preceptorship III (4) / Fall, Spring

Clinical preceptorship, 12 hours. Expands clinical practice in primary and extended care settings. Facilitates the integration of nursing and other theories and research in providing health care to individuals, families and groups. Conceptual perspectives are applied as a foundation for complex decision making in advanced nursing practice. Professional identity is expanded to integrate the multiple aspects of the nurse practitioner role. Prerequisites: NURS 540A/B, 549 and 550A/B.

551AB FNP Preceptorship: Clinical Challenge (3, 3) Fall, Spring

Clinical preceptorship challenge. Faculty evaluation of clinical practice skills in areas of practice included in NURS 549, FNP Preceptorships I and II. Includes faculty site visits in prearranged settings that provide appropriate types of cases for adequate evaluation. The basis for evaluation includes observation of practice, case discussion and chart review. Prerequisites: acceptance to the family nurse practitioner program, prior nurse practitioner training and consent of instructor.

552 Pharmacology for FNPs (3) / Fall

Develops a foundation for safe and effective management of client's pharmacological needs in the care of common acute and chronic illnesses. Research findings and theory-based knowledge are applied in assessing the needs of the individual client for medications and patient education. Parameters of legal practice and community standards of care are addressed.

578 Project Continuation (1-3) / Fall, Spring

Designed for students working on their thesis or master's project but who have otherwise completed all graduate coursework toward their degree. This course cannot be applied toward the minimum number of units needed for completion of the master's degree. Prerequisite: permission of the graduate coordinator. Cr/NC only.

595 Special Studies in Nursing (1-4) / Fall, Spring

Individually arranged course for one or more students who wish to pursue academic interests beyond the scope of the regular curriculum. Prerequisites: acceptance into master's program in nursing, and consent of instructor and department chair.

596 Selected Topics in Nursing (1-4)

A single topic or set of related topics not ordinarily covered in the graduate curriculum (e.g., nursing administration and supervision, curriculum development and teaching methods). The course may be repeated for credit with a different topic, to a maximum of 12 units. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

599 Master's Thesis (2-6)

Research on thesis developed by student in consultation with nursing department faculty, and approved by the department and the student's thesis committee. Prerequisites: NURS 503A and approval of thesis prospectus.


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