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Physics

Department Office
Darwin Hall 125
707 664-2119
www.phys-astro.sonoma.edu

Department Chair
Joseph S. TennAdministrative Coordinator
Gayle Walker

Faculty
Lynn R. Cominsky, Enrique W. Izaguirre, *John R. Dunning Jr.,
Saeid Rahimi, Gordon G. Spear, Joseph S. Tenn, Brock L. Weiss
*Faculty Early Retirement Program

Bachelor of Science in Physics Course Plan /Sample Four-Year Program for Bachelor of Science in Physics / Sample Four-Year Program for Bachelor of Science in Physics- Applied Physics Concentration / Bachelor of Arts in Physics Course Plan / Sample Four-Year Programs for Bachelor of Arts in Physics / Physics Minor or Teaching Credential Preparation / Individual Course Descriptions

Programs offered
Bachelor of Science in Physics
Bachelor of Arts in Physics
Minor in Physics
Teaching Credential Preparation


Those engaged in the discipline of physics have as their goal the discovery, elucidation and application of the laws that govern the interactions of matter throughout the physical universe. In its most abstract form, physics is a search for the forces of nature and the source of the presently known fundamental forces of gravitation, electricity and magnetism, and the weak and strong nuclear interactions, and for the elementary particles from which all matter is formed. Physics provides a description of complicated phenomena in terms of a few basic principles and laws.

Physicists also use their knowledge of fundamental principles to solve more concrete problems. Problems in understanding and utilizing the properties of semiconductors, metals and ceramics; in the theory, design and applications of lasers; in applications of the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with matter; and in the theory and design of modern electronic instrumentation, among many others, are amenable to solution using the techniques of physics. Such topics, usually described as ?applied physics,? often overlap with engineering. Indeed, many of the department?s graduates are currently employed in engineering positions.

The department offers a traditional, mathematically rigorous program leading to a B.S. in physics; a newly revised, rigorous, more applied curriculum leading to a B.S. in physics with a concentration in applied physics with areas of study in applied optics, applied nuclear physics and applied electronics and devices; and a very flexible B.A. program with two advisory plans. All programs stress fundamental concepts and techniques, and offer an unusually rich laboratory experience and intensive use of computers.

With the selection of appropriate courses, students can learn to use such instruments and techniques as optical time-domain reflectometry, solid state and tunable dye lasers, an argon laser with computerized Raman spectroscopy detector, fiber-optic instrumentation, neutron activation analysis with gamma radiation spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and x-ray fluorescence, and charge-coupled device (CCD) imagery and analysis with observatory telescopes.

A substantial program in undergraduate astronomy includes many courses, listed in this catalog under ?Astronomy,? which may be included in the two degree programs.

Bachelor of Science in Physics

The B.S. program is a thorough introduction to the principles of physics, providing a strong foundation for graduate study or industrial research. It is also intended for those students who wish to prepare for interdisciplinary studies on the graduate level in fields such as astronomy, atmospheric science, biophysics, environmental science, geophysics and physical oceanography.
Degree Requirements units
General education 51
Major requirements (may include 5 units in GE) 46
Supporting courses (may include 4 units in GE) 26
Electives 1-10
Total units needed for graduation 124
Major Core Requirements
PHYS 114 Introduction to Physics I (may be applied to GE) 4
PHYS 116 Introductory Laboratory Experience (may be applied to GE) 1
PHYS 214 Introduction to Physics II 4
PHYS 216 Introductory Laboratory 1
PHYS 313 Analog and Digital Electronics 3
PHYS 313L Analog and Digital Electronics Laboratory 1
PHYS 314 Introduction to Physics III 4
PHYS 316 Introductory Quantum Laboratory 1
PHYS 320 Analytical Mechanics 3
PHYS 325 Introduction to Mathematical Physics 3
PHYS 340 Light and Optics 3
PHYS 381 Computer Applications for Scientists 2
PHYS 430 Electricity and Magnetism 3
PHYS 450 Statistical Physics 2
PHYS 460 Quantum Physics 3
Total units in the major core 38

Major Electives (Advanced)

To complete the major, select 8 units from the list below. At least two of the courses chosen must be laboratory classes.
ASTR 380 Astrophysics: Stars (3)
ASTR 482 Advanced Observational Astronomy (2)
ASTR 495 Special Studies (1-4)
PHYS 333 Precision Machining for Experimental Physics (1)
PHYS 384 X-Ray Analysis (2)
PHYS 413 Advanced Electronics (3)
PHYS 413L Advanced Electronics Laboratory (1)
PHYS 445 Photonics (3)
PHYS 447 Lasers and Holography Laboratory (1)
PHYS 449 Fiber Optics and Detectors Laboratory (1)
PHYS 475 Physics of Semiconductor Devices (3)
PHYS 481 Applied Nuclear Chemistry and Physics (2)
PHYS 482 Applied Nuclear Chemistry and Physics Laboratory (2)
PHYS 493 Senior Design Project (2)
PHYS 494 Physics Seminar (1)
PHYS 495 Special Studies (1-4)
PHYS 497 Undergraduate Research in Physics (3) (No more than 4 units total in ASTR 495 and PHYS 494, 495 and 497 may be used to fulfill this requirement. Certain selected-topics courses, ASTR or PHYS 396, may be approved by the advisor.)
Total units in the advanced electives: 8 Required Supporting Courses
MATH 161 Calculus I (3 units may be applied in GE) 4
MATH 211 Calculus II 4
MATH 241 Calculus III 4
MATH 261 Calculus IV 4
CHEM 115AB,116AB General Chemistry (1 unit may be applied in GE) 10
Total units in supporting courses 26
Total units in the major 72

Sample Four-Year Program for Bachelor of Science in Physics

The sequential nature of the physics curriculum necessitates an early start with major requirements and the distribution of general education courses over four years.

Freshman Year: 31 units

Fall Semester (15 units) Spring Semester (16 units)
CHEM 115A (4) CHEM 115B (4)
CHEM 116A (1) CHEM 116B (1)
MATH 161 (4) MATH 211 (4)
ENGL 101 (3) (GE A2) PHYS 114 (4)
Elective (2) PHYS 116 (1)
PHYS 494 (1) (Recommended) Elective (2)

Sophomore Year: 32 units

Fall Semester (15 units) Spring Semester (17 units)
MATH 261 (4) MATH 241 (4)
PHYS 214 (4) PHYS 314 (4)
PHYS 216 (1) PHYS 316 (1)
GE (3) PHYS 381 (2)
GE (3) GE (3), GE (3)

Junior Year: 31 units

Fall Semester (16 units) Spring Semester (15 units)
PHYS 313, 313L (4) PHYS 340 (3) or 430 (3)
PHYS 325 (3) PHYS 320 (3)
GE (3) GE (3)
GE (3), GE (3) GE (3), Physics Elective (3)

Senior Year: 30 units

Fall Semester (14 units) Spring Semester (16 units)
PHYS 450 (2) PHYS 340 (3) or 430 (3)
PHYS 460 (3) Physics Elective (2)
Physics Elective (3) GE (3)
GE (3) GE (3)
GE (3) Electives (5)
Total semester units: 124

See your advisor to discuss acceptable physics electives and when they will be offered. Nine of the 51 units of GE are met by required courses listed here (3 each in areas B1, B3 and B4).

Applied Physics Concentration

Students may earn a B.S. with an applied physics concentration.
Degree Requirements units
General education 51
Major requirements (may include 5 in G.E.) 48
Supporting courses (may include 4 in G.E.) 17
Electives 8-17
Total units needed for graduation 124

Major Core Requirements

PHYS 114 Introduction to Physics I (GE) 4
PHYS 116 Introductory Laboratory Experience (GE) 1
PHYS 214 Introduction to Physics II 4
PHYS 216 Introductory Laboratory 1
PHYS 313 Analog and Digital Electronics 3
PHYS 313L Analog and Digital Electronics Laboratory 1
PHYS 314 Introduction to Physics III 4
PHYS 316 Introductory Quantum Laboratory 1
PHYS 325 Introduction to Mathematical Physics 3
PHYS 340 Light and Optics 3
PHYS 381 Computer Applications for Scientists 2
PHYS 384 X-Ray Analysis 2
PHYS 430 Electricity and Magnetism 3
PHYS 450 Statistical Physics 2
PHYS 460 Quantum Physics 3
PHYS 475 Physics of Semiconductor Devices 3
Choose 2 units from the following: 2
PHYS 411 Lab Practicum (1)
ASTR 411 Lab Practicum (1)
PHYS 493 Senior Design Project (2)
PHYS 497 Undergraduate Research in Physics (2)
PHYS 411 Lab Practicum (1)
ASTR 411 Lab Practicum (1)
PHYS 493 Senior Design Project (2)
PHYS 497 Undergraduate Research in Physics (2)
 
Total units in the major core 42

Major Electives (Advanced)

Choose 6 units. No more than 1 unit in ASTR 495 and PHYS 494, 495 and 497 may be used to fulfill this requirement.
ASTR 411 Laboratory Instruction Practicum (1)
ASTR 482 Advanced Observational Astronomy (2)
ASTR 495 Special Studies (1-4)
PHYS 320 Analytical Mechanics (3)
PHYS 384 X-Ray Analysis (2)
PHYS 411 Laboratory Practicum (1)
PHYS 413 Advanced Electronics (3)
PHYS 413L Advanced Electronics Laboratory (1)
PHYS 445 Photonics (3)
PHYS 447 Lasers and Holography Laboratory (1)
PHYS 449 Fiber Optics and Detectors Lab (1)
PHYS 481 Applied Nuclear Chemistry and Physics (2)
PHYS 482 Applied Nuclear Chemistry and Physics Laboratory (2)
PHYS 493 Senior Design Project (2)
PHYS 494 Physics Seminar (1)
PHYS 495 Special Studies (1-4)
PHYS 497 Undergraduate Research in Physics (2)
Total units in the major electives: 6

Required Supporting Courses

MATH 161 Calculus I (3 units may be applied in GE) 4
MATH 211 Calculus II 4
MATH 261 Calculus III 4
CHEM 115A, 116A General Chemistry (1 unit may be applied in GE) 5
Total units in supporting courses 17
Total units in the major 65

Sample Four-Year Program for Bachelor of Science in Physics

Applied Physics Concentration

The sequential nature of the physics curriculum necessitates an early start with major requirements and the distribution of general education courses over four years. Physics electives must include 5 or 6 units in one of the application specializations.

Freshman Year: 30 units

Fall Semester (15 units) Spring Semester (15 units)
CHEM 115A (4) MATH 211 (4)
CHEM 116A (1) PHYS 114 (4)
MATH 161 (4) PHYS 116 (1)
ENGL 101 (3) (GE A2) GE (3)
Elective (2) GE (3)
PHYS 494 (1) (recommended)  

Sophomore Year: 31 units

Fall Semester (15 units) Spring Semester (16 units)
MATH 261 (4) PHYS 314 (4)
PHYS 214 (4) PHYS 316 (1)
PHYS 216 (1) PHYS 381 (2)
GE (3) GE (3)
GE (3) GE (3)
  GE (3)

Junior Year: 31 units

Fall Semester (15 units) Spring Semester (16 units)
PHYS 313, 313L (4) PHYS 340 (3) or PHYS 430 (3)
PHYS 325 (3) Physics Elective (3), GE (3)
PHYS 384 (2) GE (3), Elective (4)
GE (3), Elective (3)  

Senior Year: 32 units

Fall Semester (16 units) Spring Semester (16 units)
PHYS 450 (2) PHYS 340 (3) or PHYS 430 (3)
PHYS 460 (3) PHYS 475 (3)
Physics Elective (2) PHYS 493 or 497 or 411(2)
GE (3) GE (3)
Elective (3), Elective (3) GE (3), Elective (2)
Total semester units: 124

See your advisor to discuss acceptable physics electives and when they will be offered. Nine of the 51 units of GE are met by required courses listed here, (3 each in areas B1, B3, and B4).

Bachelor of Arts in Physics

The B.A. program allows considerable flexibility for the student who wishes to study physics as part of a liberal arts education. Two advisory plans are offered:

Advisory Plan T

This plan uses algebra and trigonometry. Students may select from a wide range of upper-division courses, appropriate to careers as science or technical writers, scientific sales personnel, technicians, programmers or other technical specialists. There is opportunity to take courses that lead to careers in the health sciences or environmental fields. Advisory Plan T is often taken as part of a double major.
Degree Requirements units
Major requirements (may include 6 in GE) 34-38
Required concentration 12
Supporting course (may include 3 in GE) 4
Remainder of general education 42
General electives 24-28
Total units needed for the degree 120

Major Core Requirements

PHYS 209AB General Physics Laboratory 2 PHYS 210AB General Physics 6

Choose one of the following two courses in modern physics or astronomy: 3-4


ASTR 305 Frontiers in Astronomy (3)
PHYS 314 Introduction to Physics III (4)

Choose one of the following two courses in optics: 3


PHYS 340 Light and Optics (3)
PHYS 342 Popular Optics (3)

An approved course in computer applications: 2-4

The major must include a minimum of 24 upper-division units in physics and astronomy. In consultation with an advisor, choose 15-18 units in additional upper-division physics and astronomy courses to meet this requirement. 15-18

Total units in the major core: 32-36

Required Area of Concentration

Courses in one other field chosen in consultation with an advisor.

Total units in area of concentration: 12

Supporting Course

MATH 107 Pre-calculus Mathematics (3 units may be applied in GE): 4

Total units in supporting course: 4
Total units in the major: 48-52

Sample Four-Year Program for Bachelor of Arts in Physics

Advisory Plan T (Algebra and Trigonometry)

The sequential nature of the physics curriculum necessitates an early start with major requirements and the distribution of general education courses over four years.

Freshman Year: 30 units

Fall Semester (15 units) Spring Semester (15 units)
MATH 107 (4) GE (3)
ENGL 101 (3) GE (3)
GE (3) GE (3)
GE (3) GE (3)
Elective (2) Elective (3)

Sophomore Year: 29 units

Fall Semester (15 units) Spring Semester (14 units)
PHYS 209A (1) PHYS 209B (1)
PHYS 210A (3) PHYS 210B (3)
GE (3) GE (3)
GE (3) GE (3)
GE (3) GE (3)
Elective (2) Elective (1)

Junior Year: 31 units

Fall Semester (15 units) Spring Semester (16 units)
ASTR 305 (3) PHYS 342 (3)
Physics Elective (UD) (3) Physics Elective (UD) (3)
Area of Concentration* (3) Area of Concentration* (3)
GE (3) GE (3)
Elective (3) GE (3)

Senior Year: 30 units

Fall Semester (15 units) Spring Semester (15 units)
Physics Elective (UD) (3) Physics Elective (UD) (3)
Physics Elective (UD) (3) Physics Elective (UD) (3)
Area of Concentration* (3) Area of Concentration* (3)
Elective (3) Electives (6)
Elective (3)  
Total semester units: 120

*Area of concentration = 12 units in one other subject. Twelve of the 51 units of GE are met by required courses listed here (in areas A2, B1, B3 and B4).

Advisory Plan C

This plan uses calculus. Students who choose this, the more popular B.A. advisory plan, have the prerequisites to take nearly all of the courses in the department. They find employment in scientific and engineering fields. Some go on to graduate school in interdisciplinary sciences. This degree program is appropriate for those who wish to earn a California teaching credential in science.
Degree Requirements units
Major requirements (may include 5-6 in GE) 34-38
Required concentration 12
Supporting courses (may include 3 in GE) 12
Remainder of general education 42
General electives 16-20
Total units needed for graduation 120

Major Core Requirements

PHYS 114 Introduction to Physics I (GE) 4
PHYS 116 Introductory Laboratory Experience (GE) 1
PHYS 214 Introduction to Physics II 4
PHYS 216 Introductory Laboratory 1
PHYS 314 Introduction to Physics III 4
PHYS 340 Light and Optics 3
Choose one of the following two programming courses: 2-4
 PHYS 381 Computer Applications for Scientists (2)
CS 150 Introduction to Programming I (4)
The major must include a minimum of 24 upper-division units in physics and astronomy, so, with an advisor, choose 15-17 units in additional upper-division physics and astronomy courses 15-17
Total units in the major core 34-38

Required Area of Concentration

Courses in one other field, chosen in consultation with an advisor.
Total units in area of concentration: 12

Supporting Courses

MATH 161 Calculus I (3 units may be applied in GE) 4
MATH 211 Calculus II 4
MATH 261 Calculus IV 4
Total units in supporting courses 12
Total units in the major 58-62

Sample Four-Year Program for Bachelor of Arts in Physics

Advisory Plan C (Calculus)

The sequential nature of the physics curriculum necessitates an early start with major requirements and the distribution of general education courses over four years.

Freshman Year: 31 units

Fall Semester (16 units) Spring Semester (15 units)
MATH 161 (4) MATH 211 (4)
ENGL 101 (3) PHYS 114 (4)
GE (3) PHYS 116 (1)
GE (3) GE (3)
GE (3) GE (3)

Sophomore Year: 30 units

Fall Semester (15 units) Spring Semester (15 units)
MATH 261 (4) PHYS 314 (4)
PHYS 214 (4) PHYS 381 (2)
PHYS 216 (1) GE (3)
GE (3) GE (3)
GE (3) Elective (3)

Junior Year: 30 units

Fall Semester (15 units) Spring Semester (15 units)
Physics Elective (UD) (3) PHYS 340 (3)
Physics Elective (UD) (3) Physics Elective (UD) (3)
Area of Concentration* (3) Area of Concentration* (3)
GE (3) GE (3)
GE (3) Elective (3)
   

Senior Year: 29 units

Fall Semester (16 units) Spring Semester (15 units)
Physics Elective (UD) (3) Physics Elective (UD) (3)
Area of Concentration* (3) Area of Concentration* (3)
GE (3), Electives (5) GE (3), Electives (6)
Total semester units: 120

*Area of Concentration = 12 units in one other subject. Eleven of the 51 units of GE are met by required courses listed here (in areas A2, B1, B3, and B4). (One more can be met with a physics elective.)

Minor in Physics

Completion of a minimum of 20 units in physics courses, including not more than one first course or more than one second course, constitutes a minor in physics. (First courses are PHYS 100, 210A, and 114 and their equivalents taught elsewhere. Second courses are PHYS 210B, 214 and their equivalents.). Interested students should consult with the advisor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy.

Teaching Credential Preparation

See the Teaching Credential Preparation in Science Courses section of this catalog, or for more information, please contact Joseph Tenn, Darwin Hall 144, 707 664-2594, joe.tenn@sonoma.edu or Douglas Martin, Darwin Hall 311D, 707 664-2833, doug.martin@sonoma.edu.

Physics Courses (PHYS)

Classes are offered in the semesters indicated. Please see the Schedule of Classes for most current information and faculty teaching assignments. Grading Policy: All courses submitted toward major requirements in the Physics and Astronomy Department must be taken for a letter grade (A-F). This policy does not apply to courses challenged or offered only on a Cr/NC basis.

100 Descriptive Physics (3) / Fall, Spring

Lecture, 3 hours. A descriptive survey of the important principles of physics. Not recommended for B.S. students. Satisfies GE, category B1 or B3 (Physical Sciences). Prerequisite for chemistry, physics or mathematics majors: Physics and Astronomy Department approval.

102 Descriptive Physics Laboratory (1) / Spring

Laboratory, 3 hours. Experimental demonstrations, exercises, and field trips illustrating the methods by which physicists have learned what they claim to know about the world. Instruction is at the PHYS 100 level. Satisfies GE, category B1 or B3 (Physical Sciences) and GE laboratory requirements. Prerequisite: previous or concurrent enrollment in PHYS 100 or ASTR 100, or consent of instructor.

114 Introduction to Physics I (4) / Fall, Spring

Lecture, 4 hours. The first of three basic sequential courses in physics for science and mathematics majors. Introduction to vectors; classical mechanics, including particle dynamics and fluid mechanics; simple harmonic motion; thermodynamics and kinetics. Satisfies GE, category B1 or B3 (Physical Sciences). Prerequisite: MATH 161.

116 Introductory Laboratory Experience (1) Fall, Spring

Laboratory, 3 hours. Demonstrations and participatory experiments are used to increase the student?s familiarity with gravitational, electromagnetic and nuclear forces in nature. Applications include biological, geophysical, medical and environmental phenomena. Satisfies GE, category B1 or B3 (Physical Sciences) and GE laboratory requirements. Prerequisite: previous or concurrent enrollment in PHYS 114.

209AB General Physics Laboratory (1, 1) A, Fall; B, Spring

Laboratory, 3 hours. Laboratory experiments to accompany PHYS 210AB and develop the student?s ability to perform measurements of physical phenomena and to increase their appreciation of the sense of the physical universe gained through experimentation. 209A satisfies GE, category B1 or B3 (Physical Sciences) and GE laboratory requirements. Prerequisites: high school algebra and trigonometry and a high school physical science. For 209A: previous or concurrent enrollment in PHYS 210A. For 209B: 209A and previous or concurrent enrollment in 210B.

210AB General Physics (3, 3) / A, Fall; B, Spring

Lecture, 3 hours. A basic course in physics for students majoring in biology, geology or preprofessional programs. Fundamentals of Newtonian mechanics, thermophysics, optics, electricity and magnetism, special relativity, and quantum physics. Registration by mathematics majors requires Physics and Astronomy Department approval. 210A satisfies GE, category B1 or B3 (Physical Sciences) requirement. Prerequisites: high school algebra and trigonometry.

214 Introduction to Physics II (4) / Fall, Spring

Lecture, 4 hours. The continuation of PHYS 114. Electrostatics, quasistatic fields and currents, magnetostatics; electromagnetic induction; waves; physical and geometric optics. Prerequisites: PHYS 114; previous or concurrent enrollment in MATH 211.

216 Introductory Laboratory (1) / Fall, Spring

Laboratory, 3 hours. Selected experiments to increase the student?s working physical knowledge of the natural world. Prerequisites: PHYS 114 and 116. Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 214 is strongly recommended.

313 Analog and Digital Electronics (3) / Fall

Lecture, 3 hours. DC and AC circuit theory, applications of diodes, transistors and operational amplifiers, electronic test instruments; electronic transducers; waveform generators; noise; logic gates and Boolean algebra; number systems and codes; combinational logic circuits; applications of circuit simulation programs. Crosslisted as CHEM 313. Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 313L or CHEM 313L is mandatory. Prerequisites: MATH 107; PHYS 210B or 214; or consent of instructor.

313L Analog and Digital Electronics Laboratory (1) Fall

Laboratory, 3 hours. Laboratory to accompany PHYS 313. Crosslisted with CHEM 313L. Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 313 or CHEM 313 is mandatory. Experiments in this lab are designed to address the major topics of PHYS 313 lecture course. Students will experiment with physical and simulated circuits. Prerequisites: MATH 107; PHYS 210B or 214; or consent of instructor.

314 Introduction to Physics III (4) / Spring

Lecture, 4 hours. The continuation of PHYS 214. Special relativity; elementary quantum mechanics; the Bohr atom and deBroglie waves; the Schr?inger wave equation with applications to simple one-dimensional problems and to atomic structure; elementary nuclear physics; introduction to equilibrium statistical mechanics; the partition function, Boltzmann statistics. Prerequisites: PHYS 214; previous or concurrent enrollment in MATH 261.

316 Introductory Quantum Laboratory (1) / Spring

Laboratory, 3 hours. Advanced experiments to increase the student?s understanding of the experimental foundations of quantum physics. Prerequisites: PHYS 214 and 216. Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 314 strongly recommended.

320 Analytical Mechanics (3) / Spring

Lecture, 3 hours. Principles of Newtonian mechanics. Relativistic dynamics. Introduction to Hamiltonian mechanics. Applications to central force problems and small vibrations. Prerequisites: PHYS 114 and previous or concurrent enrollment in PHYS 325.

325 Introduction to Mathematical Physics (3) / Fall

Lecture, 3 hours. Coordinate systems and vectors; vector calculus; series expansions; differential equations; orthonomal functions; matrices and tensors; eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and eigenfunctions; solutions of systems of linear equations; complex numbers, complex plane, polar forms; Fourier series and Fourier integrals; use of mathematical symbolic processing software. Prerequisites: PHYS 214 and MATH 261 or consent of instructor.

333 Precision Machining for Experimental Physics (1) / Spring

Laboratory, 3 hours. Techniques of precision machining as employed in the fabrication of experimental scientific apparatus. Emphasis on the use of the lathe and milling machine, working properties of metals and plastics, conventions of design drawings. Prerequisite: advanced standing as a physics major or consent of instructor.

340 Light and Optics (3) / Spring

Lecture, 3 hours. The quantum theory of light, coherence, interference, diffraction and polarization, masers, lasers, geometrical optics, spectroscopy. Prerequisite: PHYS 314 or 325.

342 Popular Optics (3) / Spring

Lecture, 3 hours. A descriptive, nonmathematical, but analytical treatment of the physical properties of light, the camera, telescope, microscope and laser; holography, mirages, rainbows and the blue sky; colors in flowers, gems and pigments; human and animal vision and visual perception. Satisfies GE, category B3 (Specific Emphasis in Natural Sciences). Prerequisite: any physical science course or consent of instructor.

350 Descriptive Quantum Physics and Relativity (3)

A survey of the development, interpretation and implications of the concepts of quantum physics and relativity that form the basis for the current understanding of the laws of the physical universe. Experiments that require a quantum theory explanation, or that tested the application of quantum theory to real physical systems, will be discussed. Prerequisite: a one-semester course in physics or astronomy or consent of instructor.

381 Computer Applications for Scientists (2) / Spring

Lecture, 1 hour; laboratory, 3 hours. Applications in physics using a high-level programming language like FORTRAN or C. Numerical solutions to differential equations. Prerequisites: PHYS 114 and MATH 211.

384 X-Ray Analysis (2)

Lecture, 1 hour; laboratory, 3 hours. Industrial, environmental, and medical uses of x-ray powder diffraction for crystal structure studies and x-ray fluorescence for elemental composition determinations. Data obtained using our computer-coupled x-ray diffraction instrument is analyzed with the help of Jade+ software and the current powder diffraction file of crystal structures. Sample preparation and radiation safety. Prerequisites: CHEM 115A and either PHYS 209B or PHYS 216, or consent of instructor.

395 Community Involvement Program (1-2)

CIP involves students in basic community problems related to physics and astronomy?performing such tasks as tutoring, reading to the blind, service to local, county and state agencies, and service as teacher aides to elementary schools. Students receive 1-2 units, depending on the specific task performed. Not more than 4 CIP units will be applicable to the physics major requirements. May be taken by petition only.

396 Selected Topics in Physics (1-3)

A course of lectures on a single topic or set of related topics not ordinarily covered in the physics curriculum. The course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

400 History of Physical Science (3)

Lecture, 3 hours. A survey of the historical development of the physical sciences. Prerequisite: major in the physical sciences or consent of the instructor.

411 Laboratory Instruction Practicum (1)

Laboratory, 3 hours. Presentation of experimental techniques and guidance of student activities in a lower-division physics laboratory under the supervision of the instructor in charge of the laboratory. Development and application of instructional experiments in physics. May be repeated for up to 3 units of credit, with different subject matter in each repetition. Prerequisites: junior standing in physics and consent of instructor.

413 Advanced Electronics (3) / Spring

Lecture, 3 hours. Flip-flops and sequential logic circuits; timing diagrams families of logic devices; MSI and LSI devices; D/A and A/D converters; measurements and signal processing; introduction to microprocessors and microcomputers; microprocessor-controlled circuits; application of circuit simulation programs. Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 413L is mandatory. Prerequisites: PHYS 313 and 313L or CHEM 313 and 313L, or consent of instructor.

413L Advanced Electronics Laboratory (1) / Spring

Laboratory, 3 hours. Laboratory to accompany PHYS 413. Experiments in this lab are designed to address the major topics of the PHYS 413 lecture course. Students will experiment with physical and simulated circuits. Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 413 is mandatory. Prerequisites: PHYS 313 and 313L or CHEM 313 and 313L, or consent of instructor.

430 Electricity and Magnetism (3) / Spring

Lecture, 3 hours. Electrostatics, magnetostatics, electric currents, electromagnetic induction, electric and magnetic fields in matter, Maxwell?s equations, retarded potentials, radiation reaction, light emission, simple scattering and antenna theory, properties of waveguides, relativistic formulation of electrodynamics, Fourier decomposition of fields. Prerequisites: PHYS 214 and previous or concurrent enrollment in PHYS 325.

445 Photonics (3) / Spring

Lecture, 3 hours. Gaussian beams; guided-wave optics; fiber optics; optical resonators; resonant cavities; laser oscillation and amplification; laser excitation; optical pumping; solid state, gas, dye, chemical, excimer and free electron lasers; semiconductor lasers; laser spectroscopy; fiber optic communication; photomultiplier and semiconductor radiation detectors including photoconductors, junction photodiodes; p-i-n diodes, avalanche photodiodes; detector noise. Prerequisite: PHYS 314 or consent of instructor.

447 Lasers and Holography Laboratory (1) / Spring

Laboratory, 3 hours. Gas lasers: external mirror laser alignment; scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer; longitudinal and transverse mode structure and coherence; laser beam modulation; laser spectroscopy; making holograms; diode lasers: pulsed and CW measurements of threshold current density; tuning and beam profiling; spectrum analysis of diode lasers, LEDs, and diode-pumped solid state lasers. Prerequisite: previous or concurrent enrollment in PHYS 445, or consent of instructor.

449 Fiber Optics, and Detectors Laboratory (1) / Fall

Laboratory, 3 hours. Numerical aperture measurements; wide-band fiber loss measurements including 850, 1310, and 1550 nm; fiber optic return loss and break-point detection; optoelectronic modulation in optical fibers; multiplexing in optical fibers; beam quality in optical fibers; radiation detection with photomultipliers; characterization of photodiodes; avalanche and p-i-n diodes; photodetector applications; photoconductor applications. Prerequisites: PHYS 316 and previous or concurrent enrollment in PHYS 445, or consent of instructor.

450 Statistical Physics (2) / Fall

Lecture, 2 hours. The laws of thermodynamics: Boltzmann, Bose and Fermi statistics; applications. Prerequisite: PHYS 314.

460 Quantum Physics (3) / Fall

Lecture, 3 hours. The Schr?inger's equation; coordinate and momentum representation; harmonic oscillator; angular momentum and spin; Hilbert space; eigenvalues and eigenvectors; completeness relations; central potentials; hydrogen atom; scattering; perturbation theory; Dirac notation. Extensive use of a symbolic processing program. Prerequisites: PHYS 314 and 325.

475 Physics of Semiconductor Devices (3) / Spring

Lecture, 3 hours. Semiconductor materials, crystal structure and growth; energy bands and charge carriers, conductivity and mobility; metal-semiconductor and p-n junctions; p-n junction diodes, bipolar junction transistors, field-effect transistors, CCD's, photonic devices and integrated circuits. Projects in photolithography; conductivity and contact resistance measurements; I-V and C-V characteristics of diodes; characterization of transistors may be assigned. Prerequisite: PHYS 314 or consent of instructor.

481 Applied Nuclear Chemistry and Physics (2) / Fall

Lecture, 2 hours. This course offers a working knowledge of nuclear radiations, radioactive sources, and nuclear reactors. Interaction of ionizing radiation with matter; physical, chemical, and biological effects. Radiochemical dating. Nuclear models. Nuclear reactor theory and neutron activation. Radioactive tracer methods. Cross-listed as CHEM 481. Prerequisites: PHYS 214, CHEM 115A, CHEM 116A and one upper-division course in the natural sciences.

482 Applied Nuclear Chemistry and Physics Laboratory (2) / Fall

Laboratory lecture, 1 hour; laboratory, 3 hours. The use and production of radioactive sources. Nuclear reactor problems using a neutron howitzer. Applications to detection of trace elements, nuclear chemical phenomena, radiological safety. State-of-the-art instrumentation and laboratory practices. Crosslisted as CHEM 482. Prerequisites: PHYS 216 and previous or concurrent enrollment in PHYS 481.

493 Senior Design Project (2) / Fall, Spring

A directed project to develop either a working prototype or a detailed conceptual design for an operational laboratory device. A report on the design characteristics considered and selected for the device will be required. Prerequisites: PHYS 313 and 313L.

494 Physics Seminar (1) / Fall, Spring

A series of lectures on topics of interest in physics, astronomy, and related fields. May be repeated for credit up to 3 units maximum. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

495 Special Studies (1-4) / Fall, Spring

The Physics and Astronomy Department encourages independent study and considers it to be an educational undertaking. Students wishing to enroll for special studies are required to submit proposals to their supervising faculty members that outline their projects and exhibit concrete plans for their successful completion.

497 Undergraduate Research in Physics (2)

Supervised research in an area of physics that is currently under investigation by one or more members of the Physics and Astronomy Department?s faculty. This course may be repeated for up to 6 units of credit. Prerequisites: junior standing and consent of instructor.


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