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Sonoma State University

CHICANO AND LATINO STUDIES


Department Office
Nichols Hall 214
(707) 664-2369
www.sonoma.edu/cals/

Department Chair
Raymond Castro

Administrative Coordinator
Perce Smith

Faculty
Raymond Castro, Manuel Hidalgo, Patricia Kim- Rajal

Lecturers
Frances Day, Carol Delgado, Jose Luis Guterrez, Laura Larque, Daniel Lopez, Roberto Ramirez, Eligio Velasquez

Course Plan / Sample Four-Year Program for CALS/Liberal Studies Majors / Chicano and Latino Studies Minor or Teaching Credential Preparation / CALS Subject Matter Preparation Program and CLAD/BCLAD Credential Four-year Schedule for CALS/Liberal Studies Majors / Center of the Study of Latino Families and Children / Individual Class Descriptions

Programs offered
Bachelor of Arts in Chicano and Latino Studies
Teaching Credential Preparation Program in Chicano and Latino Studies/Liberal Studies
Teaching Credential Preparation Program in Chicano and Latino Studies/Social Science
Integrated Bachelor of Arts and Teaching Credential Program
Minor in Chicano and Latino Studies

The Chicano and Latino Studies major employs an interdisciplinary approach to examine the historical, political, social, educational, economic, and cultural developments that affect Chicano and other Latino communities in the United States. Further, the major allows students to analyze mainstream American culture and Chicano/Latino cultures from the perspective of a linguistic, ethnic, and contemporary cultural studies framework. Current demographic patterns make clear the importance of the Chicano/Latino heritage and its increasing significance in regional, and national affairs. The program encourages students to go beyond their own culture and explore the different ways other cultures have contributed to both national and international economics, politics, and social developments.

The Chicano and Latino Studies core provides the comprehensive basis for a liberal arts education. The Chicano/Latino population will require trained professionals who are qualified linguistically and culturally to serve the needs of the Spanish-speaking communities both in the United States and abroad. The B.A. in Chicano and Latino studies provides an excellent background for students preparing for careers in bilingual education, criminal justice, social services, law, business, counseling, and community service. Chicano and Latino Studies also offers teacher subject matter preparation (waiver) programs in liberal studies and in social science leading to entrance into Multiple Subjects and Single Subject Teaching Credential programs.

In order to broaden their career opportunities, students are encouraged to explore the possibilities of a double major or a minor in complementary areas of study, such as Spanish, English, California cultural studies, sociology, psychology, management, international business, and Latin American studies.

Bachelor of Arts in Chicano and Latino Studies

Degree Requirements Units
General education 51
Major requirements 40
Area of concentration (required for teacher preparation) 15
Electives or supporting courses 14
Total units needed for graduation 120

Major Core Requirements

CALS 225 Spanish for Chicanos and Latinos (5) includes lab or  
CALS 426 Chicano/Latino Sociolinguistics (4) 4
CALS 374 Chicano/Latino Literature (4)
4
CALS 405 The Chicano/Latino Family (4) 4
CALS 445 Chicano/Latino History (4) 4
CALS 451 Chicano/Latino Humanities (4) 4
CALS 458 Chicano and Latino Studies Research Issues and Information Literacy (4) 4
CALS 480 Chicano/Latino Studies Seminar (4) 4

Choose additional units from the following courses:
CALS 219 Chicano/Latino Identity and Heritage (3)*
CALS 220 Chicano/Latino Arts and Literature (3)*
CALS 339 Chicanos/Latinos in U.S. Society (3)
CALS 340 Chicano/Latino Folklore and Popular Culture (3)
CALS 352 Chicano/Latino Philosophy (3)
CALS 354 Latino Politics (4)
CALS 365 Chicano/Latino Theatre (1-2)
CALS 366 Mexican Folk and Traditional Dance (1-2)
CALS 368 Chicano/Latino Music (3)
CALS 393 Chicano/Latino Cinema (3)
CALS 403 Chicano/Latino Youth and Adolescents (3-4)
CALS 407 Chicano/Latino Males (3-4)
CALS 432 Latino Community Development (4)
CALS 456 Bilingual/Cross-Cultural Education (4)
CALS 479 Chicano/Latino Art History (3-4)
CALS 490 Chicano/Latino Children's Literature (3-4)
* These courses are designed for lower-division, non-major students.
Total units in the major: 40

Required Major Concentrations

Students may pursue several options in order to meet the CALS major requirements. CALS majors may select liberal studies as a preparation for the teaching profession. This subject matter preparation program also requires an area of concentration. Students should consult advisors for program planning.

Sample Four-year Program for CALS/Liberal Studies Majors*

Freshman Year: 30 Units

Fall Semester (15 Units) Spring Semester (15 Units)
ENGL 101 (A2) (3) BIOL 115 (B2) (3)
MATH 100 (B4) (3) CALS 219 or ANTH 203 (D1) (3)
ARTS GE (C1) (3) PHIL 101 (A3) (3)
Earth Science GE (B1) (3) HIST 201 (D2) (3)
Elective (Spanish, if needed) (3) Elective (Spanish, if needed) (3)

Sophomore Year: 32 Units

Fall Semester (16 Units) Spring Semester (16 Units)
HUMS 200 (A1) (3) PHIL 120 (C3) (3)
ENGL or FL 214 (C2) or equivalent (3) Phys. Sci. UD GE (B3) or Elective (3)
POLS 200 (D4) (3) GEOG 302 UD GE (D5) or Elective (3)
CALS or Area of Concentration Elective (3)  
HIST 251 (D3) (3) CALS 220 (C4) (3-4) or elective
  CALS 395 Field Experience (1)
  CALS or Area of Concentration Elective (3)

Junior Year: 32 Units

Fall Semester (16 Units) Spring Semester (16 Units)
CALS 310 (1) CALS 225 (4)
CALS 374 or 490 (3-4) CALS 225L (1)
CALS 405 (4) CALS 336 (1)
CALS 451 (4) CALS 403 (4)
CALS 458 (4) CALS 445 (4)
Waiver, concentration, or language courses CALS 459 (2)
  Waiver, concentration, or language courses

Senior Year: 30 Units

Fall Semester (15 Units) Spring Semester (15 Units)
CALS 426 (4) CALS 480 (3)
CALS 456 (4)  
CALS 460 (3)  
CALS elective or waiver courses Credential, waiver, concentration, or language courses (12)

Total semester units: 120
* This sample four-year program applies to CALS majors in the waiver program; all other CALS majors should consult their advisor.

Spanish Language Requirement

The program is committed to the principle that students need to develop their Spanish language competencies, and requires that all majors take the necessary courses and/or field experiences to develop their Spanish language skills. Proficiency in Spanish is a crucial skill for students who plan to become teachers, work in community services, go to graduate school, or do Chicano/Latino-studies-related research. Spanish language competency requirement may be met through coursework by passing the language examination used for bilingual credential students, or by approved study abroad.

Minor in Chicano and Latino Studies

The minor provides students with necessary general studies and essential knowledge about the Chicano/Latino experience. The minor is especially suited for those persons seeking teaching or public service careers in Spanish-speaking communities. Twenty units from the major core courses constitutes the minimum requirement for the minor.

Teaching Credential Preparation

Please see "Education" section for information on professional education programs. For more information, review the University's special bulletin, Programs in Teacher Education.

A. Subject Matter Preparation Program in Chicano and Latino Studies/Liberal Studies

This program, a state-approved waiver program, meets the subject matter preparation requirements for entry into the Multiple Subjects (Elementary) Teaching Credential. It is specifically designed to provide academic preparation for those students interested in entering the Multiple Subjects/Bilingual Credential program. At the beginning of the junior year, students must consult with their advisors from Chicano and Latino Studies before enrolling in the CALS/liberal studies subject matter preparation program. Students should contact the department for program information and advising materials.

B. Subject Matter Preparation Program in Chicano and Latino Studies/Social Science*

This program meets the subject matter requirement for entry into the Single Subject (Secondary) Teaching Credential program. At the beginning of the junior year, students must consult with their advisor before enrolling in one of the following tracks with the Chicano and Latino Studies/Social Science Subject Matter Preparation option:
1. CALS/Social Science (Bilingual option)
2. CALS/Social Science (Non-Bilingual option)
* This program is currently under revision.

C. Spanish Language and Chicano/Latino Culture Competencies

All students pursuing a bilingual credential must successfully satisfy Spanish language and Chicano/Latino culture competencies. This should begin at the time the student applies for admission to the credential program and be fulfilled upon completion of the program. For further information, contact the bilingual program coordinator in the Department of Education. Please see sample four-year program.

D. Minors for Prospective Teachers

For information on minors that are especially suitable for CALS majors pursuing an elementary teaching credential, please see "Applied Arts" section for a description of the applied arts minor and the University's special bulletin, Programs in Teacher Education.

E. Integrated Four-year Teacher Preparation Program

(involves the acquisition of the CALS Bachelor of Arts and the Multiple Subjects CLAD/BCLAD Credential within four years).

Integrated Program Department of Chicano and Latino Studies (CALS) Subject Matter Preparation Program and CLAD/BCLAD Credential Four Year (8) Semester Schedule for CALS/Liberal Studies Majors

Freshman Year: 30-31 Units

Fall Semester (15 Units) Spring Semester (15-16 Units)
ENGL 101 (A2) (3) BIOL 115 (B2) + 115L (3-4)
MATH 100 (B4) (3) PHIL 101 (A3) (3)
ARTS GE (C1) (3) HIST 201 (D2) (3)
Earth Science GE (B1) (3) PHIL 120 (C3) (3)
POLS 200 (D3) (3) EDUC 250 or EDUC 329 (3) or CALS 395 or EMT or Elective

Sophomore Year: 31-33 Units

Fall Semester (16-17 Units) Spring Semester(15-16 Units)
HUMS 200 (A1) (3) CALS 225 (C4) or Elective (3-4)
CALS 310 or 365 or 366 in Spring (1) CALS 365 or 366 or 310 in Fall (1)
HIST 251 (D3) (3) CALS 403 (E) (3-4)
CALS 339 (D1) or EDUC 417 (D1) (3) EDUC 410 (4)
CALS 458 (4) MATH 300 (4)
GEOG 302 (D5) (3)  

Junior Year: 31-32 Units

Fall Semester (15-16 Units) Spring Semester (16 Units)
CALS 451 (4) CALS 445 (4)
CALS 460 (3) CALS 459 (2)
CALS 374 (C2) or CALS 490 (3-4) EDUC 462 (4)
EDUC 460 (3) EDUC 461 (4)
EDUC 472 (2) EDUC 473 (2)

Senior Year: 31 Units

Fall Semester (16-17 Units) Spring Semester (15 Units)
CALS 426 or elective (3-4) CALS 480 (3)
CALS 456 (4) EDUC 482 (12)
KIN 400 (3)  
EDUC 476 (3)  
EDUC 480 (3)  

Total semester units for B.A. Waiver Program and Credential: 124-127

Notes:

  1. General education (GE), CALS and Education classes are offered during both intersession and/or summer session. Students needing summer school may choose to either take one course each summer or enroll in Phase I of the credential in the summer between junior and senior year.
  2. Students need to apply for admission to the credential program during November of the sophomore year.
  3. Students must take the CBEST prior to the beginning of the junior year.
  4. Students can use EDUC 250 or EDUC 339 or the new EMT Freshman Seminar as an elective and/or in lieu of CALS 305 to meet program field experience requirements.
  5. Integrated Program students will need to take at least 124 units to complete this unique program. See the CALS Chair for advising.

Center for the Study of Latino Families and Children

Students interested in research and community internships focusing on Latino families and children will have the opportunity to pursue these interests as part of the newly established center's activities. Consult the department chair for more information on center-related opportunities. The center is dedicated to action research and advocacy.

Chicano and Latino Studies Courses (CALS)

Courses are offered in the semesters indicated. Please see the Schedule of Classes for the most current information and faculty teaching assignments.

219 Chicano/Latino Identity and Heritage (3) / Fall, Spring

A survey of the Chicano and Latino experience in the United States. The course serves as an introduction to Chicano and Latino studies through the social sciences in order to explain the individual's status and place within the group and society. This includes how Chicano and Latinos have adapted to the various cultural, social, economic, and political elements of US society as compared to other groups. Satisfies ethnic studies requirement in GE, category D1 (Individual and Society).

220 Chicano/Latino Arts and Literature (3-4) Fall, Spring

A survey of the humanities (arts and letters) found in Chicano/Latino cultures. Introduction to traditional and contemporary literature, drama, cinema, art, music, and dance forms found in the Spanish-speaking communities of the southwestern United States and their related heritages. Satisfies ethnic studies in GE, category C4 (Comparative Perspectives).

225 Spanish for Bilinguals (4) Spring

The study of the grammar and structure of Spanish with ample practice in oral and written forms, to help develop proficiency in normative Spanish, using various language-acquisition techniques. Students will be able to enter upper-division classes in Spanish. Standard or normative Spanish will be compared and analyzed in terms of non-normative, regional, and local community varieties of Spanish. Prerequisite: functional Spanish skills at the second-year level or equivalent. Satisfies foreign language in GE, category C4 (Comparative Perspectives and Foreign Languages). This course does not satisfy GE ethnic studies requirements. Requirement: concurrent enrollment in CALS 225L.

225L Language Laboratory / Field Work (1) Spring

At least two hours per week of practice in the language laboratory or in an approved fieldwork setting such as a Spanish-speaking organization, community agency, or bilingual classroom. Cr/NC only. Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment in CALS 225.

301 Experimental and Special Topics Courses (1-5)

Offered occasionally based on student interest and faculty and resource availability. In addition to experimental and special courses, topics may also include: travel/study, lecture series, symposia, conferences, and performance art presentations and workshops.

310 Chicano/Latino Folk Arts and Crafts Workshop (1) Every fourth semester

Analysis of and workshop on providing Chicano, Mexican, and other Latino arts and crafts. Includes village and folk arts, with particular emphasis on adapting these arts to the public school curriculum. Course projects require a public exhibit.

339 Chicanos/Latinos in US Society (3)

The impact of American social policies on Chicanos and Latinos. Policy areas will include: children and families, health, and education. Major court decisions and public policies on bilingual and multicultural education, equal employment opportunity, immigration, and affirmative action will be reviewed and analyzed. Primary and secondary sources will be examined in light of historical and social outcomes. This course will focus on Chicanos/Latinos in California every other semester in conjunction with the California Cultural Studies degree. Satisfies upper-division ethnic studies in GE, category D1 (Individual and Society).

340 Chicano/Latino Folklore and Popular Culture (3) Every fourth semester

A description and analysis of traditional cultural expressions of the Mexican and Chicano people in the Southwestern United States. Includes a study of folk narratives, poetry, drama, proverbs, customs, rituals, songs, myths, and folk beliefs of both the target and mother cultures. Students also analyze contemporary manifestations of popular Chicano/Latino culture.

352 Chicano/Latino Philosophy (3) Fall, Spring

The course examines the intellectual history of the Chicano/Latino community. This includes a rich variety of ideas, belief systems, world views and philosophical perspectives derived from pre-Columbian times and later synchronized with European philosophy. The philosophical tradition of the West is seen from a different angle that provides challenging insights for students. Special attention is given to the relationship of these ideas to the ethics and values of the Chicano/Latino community within a cultural and historical milieu. A broader framework allows for the consideration of Chicano/Latino philosophy as a crossroads of Western and Asian philosophical traditions. Satisfies ethnic studies and upper-division GE, category C3 (Philosophy and Values).

354 Chicano/Latino Politics (4) Every fourth semester

An examination of the political history and current political thought of the Chicano/Latino community. Includes a survey of social, cultural, and political issues addressed by organizations in the local community and throughout the Southwest. Field experience.

365 Chicano/Latino Theatre (1-2) Every fourth semester

A review of the development of drama in literary Chicano/Latino culture from a variety of sources: anthropological, sociological, and historical, as well as contemporary developments. Course includes a workshop leading to the performance of a term play, along the lines of the Teatro Campesino. May be repeated once for credit.

366 Mexican Folk and Traditional and Dance (1-2) Spring

An introduction to folk and traditional dances of Mexico; this is a performance course requiring active student involvement. Basic steps and three to five ballet folklorico dances will be taught, leading to a public performance. Dances include Norteno, Jarabes de Jalisco, Jarochos de Veracruz, and one or more indigenous dances. May be repeated once for credit.

368 Chicano/Latino Music (3) Every fourth semester

A study of Chicano/Latino music as practiced in the community is the central concern of this course. The origins, development, and variations of this music are essential in understanding its influence and Latino music's impact on Mexico, the United States, and the world. A musical background, although helpful, is not necessary. Ultimately, the goal of the course is to help the student become aware of the nature of this music and its place in an American and global context. Satisfies ethnic studies and upper-division GE, category C1 (Fine Arts).

374 Chicano/Latino Literature (3-4) Fall

A course designed to identify, analyze, and appreciate current literary themes and forms within the Chicano/Latino experience, including their literary antecedents, through novels, short stories, poetry, and plays. This course will focus on Chicano/Latino authors from California every fourth semester in conjunction with the California Cultural Studies Program. Satisfies ethnic studies and upper-division GE, category C2 (Ethnic Studies in World Literature). Note that CALS majors are required to enroll in the section designated for majors and related fields.

393 Chicano/Latino Cinema (3) Fall

Comparative, analytical, and critical perspectives on Chicano/Latino cinema in a broad framework. A study of the Chicano/Latino in American and Mexican film leads to the focal point of the course: the emergence of Chicano/Latino film showing the culture from within. The comparative framework includes other Hispanic films (Latin American, Spanish) from throughout the Hispanic world to study interdisciplinary topics that generate film works, such as history, culture, images, and social conditions. Satisfies ethnic studies and upper-division GE, category C1 (Fine Arts).

395 Community Involvement Program (CIP) (1-4)

Provides students with practical experience in school classrooms, various ethnic community organizations, and health and social service agencies, including recreation programs, day care centers, and senior citizen centers. One unit is equivalent to 30 hours of volunteer work per semester. Units are not applicable to the CALS major. Meets field experience requirements for the CALS waiver program.

398 MEChA (1-2)

Movimiento Estudiantil Chicano de Aztlan involves students in experimental projects that will orient them to problems faced by the Chicano/Latino student community and the greater Hispanic community in the campus service area.

400 Special Topics in Chicano Studies (1-4)

Offered occasionally, based on student interest and faculty availability:
Chicano/Latino Art Workshop
Chicano Perspectives on Mexican History
La Frontera: Border Studies
Economics and the Chicano
Small Business Development: Chicano/Latino Community
La Chicana, and others to be announced

403 Chicano/Latino Youth and Adolescents (3-4) Spring

General psychological principles and theories of growth and human development as they apply to Chicano/Latino youth. Course will focus on Latino adolescents and their adjustment to the life cycle and American society and its impact on the self, peer group relations, family life, and other sources of growth and conflict. Satisfies ethnic studies and upper-division GE, category E.

405 The Chicano/Latino Family (3-4) / Fall

An examination of changing family patterns among Latinos in the US This will include an analysis of prevalent family theories with a focus on such issues as parent cultural belief systems, traditional and evolving gender roles, marriage and alternative family life styles, and child rearing trends. The course also will review how Latino families interact with education, health, and public welfare institutions.

407 The Chicano/Latino Male (3-4) Every fourth semester

This course explores the economic, political, and sociocultural forces that contribute to the formation of Latino masculinity. Students will move beyond ethnic and gender stereotypes to develop an understanding of Latino men as both products of and contributors to evolving relationships. The different roles of Latino males including son, father, worker, husband, partner/lover, and friend will be examined.

410 Seminar: Chicano/Latino Counseling Strategies (2-4) / Every forth semester

Present-day theories of counseling, theoretical issues, and special problems encountered in counseling Chicanos and Latinos. Goals, processes, and techniques of counseling in a cross-cultural setting. Students enrolled for 4 units must enroll in a precounseling practicum. Prerequisite: upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

426 Chicano/Latino Sociolinguistics (4) Spring

A linguistic analysis of Spanish compared to English and the effects that speaking both languages has on bilingual persons. Includes an examination of the development, maintenance, and varieties of Spanish spoken in the United States. Studies theories and research on ESL, bilingual education, and first and second language acquisition. Focuses on societal elements as they interact in a complex way with language usage. Chicano/Latino discourse in several dimensions is critically analyzed in conjunction with Mexican and American history, culture, society and language norms, usage, and attitudes. The course emphasizes the multifocal interrelationships between the context of Latinos and the problematic outcomes of interactions between history and language, society and linguistics, and culture and language acquisition. Meets requirements for Category II in CLAD/BCLAD credential prerequisites. Note: restricted to seniors.

432 Chicano/Latino Community Development (4) Every Forth semester

An examination of those economic, political, and social forces that affect the development of Latino communities. To include an overview of Chicano/Latino community organizations and their underlying organizational constructs. Students will examine their individual praxis within the most recent theoretical understanding of community and organizational development. Fieldwork project required.

445 Chicano/Latino History (4) Spring

An analysis of Chicano/Latino history, from the exploration and settlement of the Southwest to the present. To include an examination of such themes and topics as: the Chicano heritage, the Mexican War and Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, the land question, social banditry and other forms of resistance, the Chicano in the 20th century, and contemporary Chicano/Latino issues, organizations, and movements.

451 Chicano/Latino Humanities (3-4) Fall, Spring

A comparative analysis of the history, literature, philosophy, religion, music, visual and performing arts, and popular culture as they have developed in Chicano and Latino society from their historical origins in Mexico and Latin America. Course focuses on humanistic works and interpretations in Mexico since the Revolution in comparison to the development of contemporary Chicano/Latino humanities since the 1960s. Satisfies upper-division ethnic studies in GE, category C4 (Comparative Perspectives). Note that CALS majors are required to enroll in the section designated for majors and related fields.

456 Bilingual/Cross-cultural Education (4) Fall

A historical analysis of bilingual/cross-cultural education in the United States. The course covers bilingual/cross-cultural education concepts and the assessment of existing models programs and their impact on Latinos and other language minority students. Bilingual education topics include: historical and legal perspectives, philosophy and goals, program models, first and second language acquisition, ESL, technology, cognitive and affective development of children, minority perspectives on schooling, and empowering language-minority students. Note: restricted to seniors.

458 Chicano and Latino Studies Research Issues and Information Literacy (4) Fall

Course serves as an upper-division introduction to the CALS major. The course will expose students to CALS curriculum and research issues, build research skills, and enhance skills related to information literacy. This introductory core course is required of all CALS majors, and should be taken during the first year of the major.

459 Bilingual General Science (1-2) / Spring

A general science course taught bilingually (Spanish/English) and designed to give linguistic and cultural depth in the basic science areas required for the liberal education of future school teachers. To include areas of study in the biological, physical, and earth sciences. Prerequisite: functional Spanish language skills and completion of GE science requirements (Areas B1 and B2).

460 Bilingual Fundamentals of Mathematics (1-3) Fall

A general math course taught bilingually (Spanish/English) and designed to give linguistic and cultural depth in the mathematics required for the liberal education of future school teachers. Includes number concepts, number systems and problem solving, metrics, geometry, and probability and statistics. Prerequisite: functional Spanish language skills and completion of GE mathematics requirements (Area B4).

479 Chicano/Latino Art History (3-4) Every fourth semester

An analysis of art as expressed in the historical culture of Chicanos and Latinos, from ancient times to the present. A cultural art history approach. Field trips. Includes a studio practicum when offered for 4 units. Satisfies ethnic studies in GE, category C1 (Ethnic Studies in the Fine Arts).

480 Chicano/Latino Studies Seminar (3-4) / Spring

An in-depth analysis of selected topics from the area of Chicano/Latino studies. Using current analytical models and research techniques, students will examine in an integrative manner a specific topic for preparing a research paper and oral presentations. Course serves as a summative seminar for CALS waiver program students. Students are also required to prepare a self-assessment portfolio. Class is restricted to CALS majors who are graduating seniors or pre-student teaching credential candidates enrolled in the CALS waiver program.

490 Chicano/Latino Children's Literature (3-4) Every fourth semester

An analysis of children's literature written about and for Chicano/Latino children both in the US and abroad. Students will review and analyze the literature for style and content. Includes the study of literature collections from the Spanish-speaking community. Prerequisite: functional Spanish language skills.

495 Special Studies (1-4)

Independent study on a special topic for upper-division students. Prerequisite: completion and approval of a special studies form.

595 Special Studies (1-4)

Directed study for graduate students. Prerequisite: completion and approval of a special studies form.