Depth Psychology: MA Program

Events

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Public Programs in Depth Psychology 2015

Jeremy Morgan, M.F.A., Imaginal Geographies

Jeremy Morgan MFA Saturday Sept 26, 2015, 10 a.m. - 1 p.m.
Art 108, Sonoma State University
Doors open at 9:30 a.m.
Donations accepted
$30 fee for 3 hours CE for therapists (BBSE); CE registration at the door the morning of the event
$8 parking in Lot A next to the Art Building or $5 in Lot E, F, G (download campus map)

In this seminar Jeremy explores how his paintings are the result of a creative dialogue between the outer world of land, nature, sky, cloud, and water, and the inner world of sensation, perception, and the spiritual. His paintings are intensely hued, large-scale, abstract works that communicate spaciousness and the sublime. How does this occur?

This seminar discusses the influences and practices that have shaped Jeremy’s work, particularly those of inner awareness and shan-shui. Shan-shui, "mountain water,” is a form of Chinese landscape painting that communicates an inner spiritual experience of landscape rather than a material representation. Shan-shui is essentially philo-spiritual, with roots in Taoist philosophy that bind the landscape to spiritual manifestation. Jeremy locates qualities of abstraction in the landscape’s sublime and spiritual aspects, and his art reworks both representational landscape painting and abstraction. He explores multiple approaches to the concept of painted space as both phenomenologically and conceptually sourced. Within the Western cannon his work recognizes the role of a broader understanding of the inner aspect of consciousness, and indeed, of the role of the unconscious in illuminating the wider possibilities of presenting painted space.

Jeremy Morgan, MFA, is a painter who has shown in the Bay Area and internationally since 1983. He studied at Oxford and London's Royal Academy of Art and received a Harkness Fellowship that funded his MFA at the San Francisco Art Institute, where is an Associate Professor in Painting. His childhood vacations in Wales gave him access to remote landscapes, where he developed his passion for the natural world. His paintings develop from his perceptual experience of the natural world, and are a physical and contemplative meeting place of the material and non-material. Jeremy became aware of the Shan-shui traditions of China during his study of Asian art at Oxford, and his study of martial arts awakened his interests in Zen Buddhism. His travels to Wales, China, Nepal, and Iceland have fed his interest in the natural world and the direct experience of the phenomenal world which is fused with the immaterial forms in his work. Jeremy conducts Inquiry from Within seminars for artists for the Lucid Arts Foundation, where he explores the non-representational aspects of artists' inner worlds and encourages dialogue about arts and consciousness, and for many years taught in the Arts and Consciousness MA program at John F. Kennedy University.

Karlyn Ward, Ph.D., LCSW, What Is It About Music? Exploring the Link Between Music and Depth Psychology

music rose Saturday Oct 24, 2015, 10 a.m. - 1 p.m.
Art 102, Sonoma State University
Doors open at 9:30 a.m.
Donations accepted
$30 fee for 3 hours CE for therapists (BBSE); CE registration at the door the morning of the event
$8 parking in Lot A next to the Art Building or $5 in Lot E, F, G (download campus map)

“Music, as a structured envelope of sound, is probably the most effective and safe opener to the doors of the psyche. It reaches beyond personal defenses to the realities and beauties of the person. Music gives access to the discovery of inner strength, uncovers the potential for creativity, and manifests ways in which life can be lived from a center of inner security." Helen L. Bonny

Music has the ability to inspire visual imagery, dance, drama, and all the emotions. Sound and music are part of our earliest awareness and experience psychologically, biologically, historically and culturally. Yet, sound and music, connected as they are with the receptive sense of hearing and listening, are little explored by the listening professions. Perhaps only in music, the earliest of languages, can the language of Eros, of deep emotions and deep feeling, be touched. Setting music in the context of biology, history, culture, the world situation and the psyche, we will explore the necessity of including music in our lives and work. To deepen our understanding, musical examples will be played and clinical material presented.

Karlyn Ward, Ph.D., LCSW, an analyst member of The C. G. Jung Institute of San Francisco, is in private practice in Mill Valley. She has written and lectured about the psyche and music. Her DVD Anchored in the Heart, Redeeming the Dark Feminine explores the figure of Mary of Magdala in word, art, and music. Her book Visitation in a Zen Garden tells in word and image about a fox family living in her own suburban back yard.

Linda Chapman, M.A., ATR-BC, RPT-S, Trauma, Neurobiology, and Art Therapy

Linda Chapman MA ATR-BC Saturday Nov 7, 2015, 10 a.m. - 1 p.m.
Art 102, Sonoma State University
Doors open at 9:30 a.m.
Donations accepted
$30 fee for 3 hours CE for therapists (BBSE); CE registration at the door the morning of the event
$8 parking in Lot A next to the Art Building or $5 in Lot E, F, G (download campus map)

The current focus on the Right Brain in psychoanalysis and psychotherapy has been the genesis of new approaches to treatment of relational or complex trauma. This seminar is designed to impart knowledge and skills in the use of an art therapy treatment model developed by the presenter for healing the negative effects of complex, developmental trauma. Beginning with a brief theoretical description of the model, the focus of the lecture will be on the practical application of the treatment interventions with children and adolescents.

Brief experimentation with art edia will allow participants to experiment with the material presented.  No prior art experience is necessary. Upon completion of the seminar, attendees will be able to: 
            -describe a model of treatment for treating chronic PTSD
            -describe art based treatment interventions to facilitate trauma resolution
            -describe ways to facilitate expression and containment of traumatic expression.

Linda Chapman, M.A., ATR-BC, RPT-S, a registered and board certified art therapist and play therapist, is a nationally recognized expert in art therapy and play therapy with children who are victims of violence, child abuse and medical trauma. She directs the Art Therapy Institute of the Redwoods in Northern California, a center for learning and therapy. Linda was affiliated with the University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine for 25 years where she held clinical faculty and research appointments, and founded and directed the UCSF/San Francisco General Hospital Pediatric Play Therapy Program. She has conducted federally funded art therapy outcome research with the UCSF/SFGH Injury Center and Children’s Hospital & Research Center Oakland. Linda is the author of Neurobiologically Informed Trauma Therapy with Children and Adolescents: Understanding Mechanisms of Change; and has published peer-review papers and chapters in Effective Treatments for PTSD: Practice Guidelines from the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies; California Art Therapy Trends; and Group Play Therapy. She is a member of the review board of Art Therapy: Journal of the American Art Therapy Association and is an adjunct faculty member at several universities.  

Linda Chapman, M.A., ATR-BC, On Neurobiologically Informed Trauma Art Therapy with Children and Adolescents

  Saturday Nov 7, 2015, 10 a.m. - 1 p.m.
Art 102, Sonoma State University
Doors open at 9:30 a.m.
Donations accepted
$30 fee for 3 hours CE for therapists (BBSE); CE registration at the door the morning of the event
$8 parking in Lot A next to the Art Building or $5 in Lot E, F, G (download campus map)

Linda Chapman, MA, ATR-BC, is a registered and board certified art therapist and play therapist who directs the Art Therapy Institute of the Redwoods in Northern California, a center for learning and therapy. Linda was affiliated with the University of California San Francisco School of Medicine for 25 years, where she held clinical faculty and research appointments. Linda was a creator and for 10 years directed the UCSF/San Francisco General Hospital Pediatric Play Therapy Program, and has conducted federally funded art therapy outcome research with the UCSF/SFGH Injury Center and Children’s Hospital & Research Center Oakland.

Linda is a nationally recognized expert in art therapy and play therapy with children who are victims of violence, child abuse and medical trauma. She is the author of several peer-review papers and has authored and co-authored chapters in Effective Treatments for PTSD: Practice Guidelines from the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies; California Art Therapy Trends; and Group Play Therapy. She is a member of the review board of Art Therapy: Journal of the American Art Therapy Association. Linda is an adjunct faculty member of many universities. Her most recent book is Neurobiologically Informed Trauma Therapy with Children and Adolescents: Understanding Mechanisms of Change.

Richard Tarnas, Ph.D. Is Modern Humanity Undergoing a Rite of Passage?

Rick Tarnas PhD Saturday Feb 28, 2015, 10 a.m. - 1 p.m.
Art 102, Sonoma State University
Doors open at 9:30 a.m.
Donations accepted
$30 fee for 3 hours CE for therapists (BBSE); CE registration at the door the morning of the event
$8 parking in Lot A next to the Art Building or $5 in Lot E, F, G (download campus map)

“We have not understood yet that the discovery of the unconscious means an enormous spiritual task, which must be accomplished if we wish to preserve our civilization.”  C. G. Jung

Our time is pervaded by a great paradox. On the one hand, we see signs of an unprecedented level of engaged global awareness, moral sensitivity to the human and non-human community, psychological self-awareness, and spiritually informed philosophical pluralism. On the other hand, we confront the most critical, and in some respects catastrophic, state of the Earth in human history. Both these conditions have emerged directly from the modern age, whose light and shadow consequences now affect every part of the planet. 

We are facing a threshold of fundamental collective transformation that bears a striking resemblance to what takes place on the individual level in initiatory rites of passage, in near-death experiences, in spiritual crises, and in critical stages of what Jung called the individuation process. Can we find a place of equilibrium, an eye in the storm, from which we can engage this time of intense polarization and rapid change more consciously and thus more skillfully?  And in such an era of transition, what is the role of "heroic" communities which carry principles and perspectives that run counter to the mainstream modern world view?

Richard Tarnas, Ph.D., is a professor of psychology and cultural history at the California Institute of Integral Studies in San Francisco, where he founded the graduate program in Philosophy, Cosmology, and Consciousness. He also lectures on archetypal studies and depth psychology at Pacifica Graduate Institute in Santa Barbara. He is the author of The Passion of the Western Mind, a history of the Western world view from the ancient Greek to the postmodern that became both a best seller and a required text in many universities; and Cosmos and Psyche: Intimations of a New World View, which received the Book of the Year Prize from the Scientific and Medical Network in the UK.  Professor Tarnas frequently lectures at various Jung institutes and societies in the U.S. as well as at Eranos in Switzerland, and served for six years on the Board of Governors of the C. G. Jung Institute of San Francisco.

Seth Isaiah Rubin, Ph.D., Preparing for the Mystery of Death

Seth Isaiah Rubin, Ph.D. Saturday March 28, 2015, 10 a.m. - 1 p.m.
Art 102, Sonoma State University
Doors open at 9:30 a.m.
Donations accepted
$30 fee for 3 hours CE for therapists (BBSE); CE registration at the door the morning of the event
$8 parking in Lot A next to the Art Building or $5 in Lot E, F, G (download campus map)

Life and death are two sides of the same coin. So understanding its place in the life cycle and preparing for death is an integral part of living life fully and becoming whole. This is the core of the individuation process. In this seminar we will carefully examine what it means for you to prepare for death. By exploring your preparations for death in terms of sensation, feeling, thinking and intuition, the four psychological functions according to Jung, you will move toward realizing wholeness and away from one-sidedness. The goal of your work in this seminar is to think creatively about the place of death in your life and how you might anticipate meeting it.

Here is a sample of what you will encounter in your work with me:

Sensation: the reality based aspects of preparing for death including, for example, wills (such as living and professional), health proxies, and burial or cremation pre-arrangements. How do you want to die?

Feeling: unfinished business with colleagues, friends, and family; relations with groups, organizations, and the collective; legacies. What do you value, and what can you let go of?

Thinking: thoughts about life and death. Reflections about the meaning of life and death. How could your death be meaningful for you?

Intuition: the mystery of life, the mystery of death. Origins and destinations as reflected in dreams, active imaginations and spiritual musings. What is your personal myth about death and dying?

Seth Isaiah Rubin, Ph.D., was seduced into the study of psychology by Lee Sechrest at Northwestern University in 1964. He graduated with honors in psychology in 1966 and continued at Northwestern defending his masters thesis in human vision under the direction of Robert Sekuler in 1967 and his Ph.D in measurement methodology with Donald T. Campbell as his advisor. As a faculty member at the University of Pennsylvania, he had a series of four archetypal dreams that led him to pursue clinical training in the Department of Psychiatry and then matriculate at the Jung Institut-Zürich. Frau Aniela Jaffe and Mario Jacoby served as his training analysts and Verena Kast, Kathrin Asper, Adolf Guggenbuhl-Craig and Paul Brutsche provided his control analysis. The Diploma in Analytical Psychology was awarded in 1987. He became a full professional member of the San Francisco Jung Institute in 1993, serving as the Principal Investigator of the San Francisco Psychotherapy Research Project from 1998 to 2004, and briefly as the Clinic Director at the Institute (2004). Seth practices as a clinical psychologist and Jungian Analyst in San Francisco.

Kate Donohue, Ph.D., R.E.A.T., A Transcendent Journey through the Mother-Line: A Voyage with Helen Hardin, Southwest Artist

Kate Donohue, PhD Saturday April 25, 2015, 10 a.m. - 1 p.m.
Art 102, Sonoma State University
Doors open at 9:30 a.m.
Donations accepted
$30 fee for 3 hours CE for therapists (BBSE); CE registration at the door the morning of the event
$8 parking in Lot A next to the Art Building or $5 in Lot E, F, G (download campus map)

Helen Hardin, a southwest artist, created her own imagistic mythology. She called these images her feminine trinity: Changing Woman, Medicine Woman and Listening Woman. They combine universal themes and Native American Tewa spiritual legends. These images emerged from her investigation of the Motherline, the unconscious feminine legacy of one's family: personally, culturally, creatively and spiritually. Stories from the Motherline are pivotal in the individuation process.

Using the life and transcendent images of bi-cultural Southwest artist Helen Hardin, we will explore her Motherline individuation process by delving into the personal, maternal, cultural and spiritual paradoxes that molded her experience, and explore the dynamic of bridging these paradoxes, via the transcendent function. By contrasting her early childhood development with her adult behavior, we see the compensatory function at work. Through her images, we see how she formed a relationship with her shadow, her animus and to the sacred. Her individuation process through the Motherline led her to numinous experiences and to the sacred feminine. There will be an opportunity for participants to explore their own relationship to the themes of the sacred feminine and the motherline that are explored in this presentation.

Helen Harding painting (image © Helen Hardin Estate)

Kate T. Donohue, Ph.D., R.E.A.T., is a licensed psychologist and registered expressive arts therapist in private practice in San Francisco. She was a founding faculty member of California Institute of Integral Studies' Expressive Arts Therapy M.A. program, founding board member of the International Expressive Arts Therapy Association, and received their shining star award in 2005. Besides teaching at many universities in the USA, Kate is an international trainer focusing on presenting Jungian-oriented expressive arts approaches to the global community. She has taught in Asia, Europe, South America, and Africa, focusing on trauma, grief, dreams and aging. Through her love of indigenous dance she has followed a current passion to explore the indigenous archetypal roots of the arts, and in 2014 led a group of professionals to Ghana to explore this approach. She will be conducting a similar training in India.

 

Jeremy Morgan, Painting and the Creative Process

Jeremy Morgan MFAJeremy Morgan explores his creative process, the inner landscape, and influences on his art, Sat Sept 26, 10 am - 1 pm, Art 108.

Information Meeting

Rune drumAttend an information meeting for the MA program on Sat Aug 22, 2-4 pm in Stevenson 3042.