School of Education News Archives

Local Teachers Featured Ed Talk Speakers for the Better Together: CA Teacher Summit July 31

By Pamela Van Halsema on July 24, 2015 4:12 PM

The Better Together: CA Teachers Summit is only one week away. More than 14,000 educators across California will gather next Friday, July 31 to learn, share ideas, dive deep into discussions and work to build and strengthen their professional networks just in time for back to school season. 

Sonoma State University is one of the 33 host universities for this inaugural event, which will include keynote speakers, an Edcamp conference and more. One exciting feature of the day are Ed Talks at each site, in which three local teachers will offer inspiring and thought provoking perspectives about their successes and challenges as teachers, offering personal narratives related to their work with implementation of the California Standards. We are pleased to announce the three featured Ed Talk speakers who will be on stage at Sonoma State next week:


Catlin Tucker: Connect Students to an Authentic Audience

Catlin Tucker is a Google Certified Teacher currently teaching at Windsor High School in Sonoma County, where she was named Teacher of the Year in 2010. She is the bestselling author of Blended Learning for Grades 4-12 and Creatively Teach the Common Core Literacy Standards with Technology (Corwin) She authored a blended learning course for ASCD and writes a monthly column for Educational Leadership. Catlin is an experienced professional development facilitator, trainer, speaker, and blogger (


Ruth Moore: Making Every Voice Matter

Ruth Moore has taught middle school English and history for 26 years to a full spectrum of learners, and has served as a BTSA mentor, department chairs and Teacher on Special Assignment. Ruth chairs as a district-wide committee of Board of Education members, district personnel and teacher representatives from K-12 to support constructive dialogue about issues of concern. She is also currently serving on the newly formed Instructional Leadership Corps, a joint venture of Stanford University and CTA to provide quality professional development around CCSS implementation.


Glenn Corey: How I Get My Students to Not Listen to the Teacher

After being a toy designer, documentary film-maker, engineer, executive and researcher, Glenn Corey followed his life-long dream to become a teacher. He teaches design and physics at Novato High School where he helps students pursue their curiosity to create value in the world. Corey is one of the first recipients of a new award presented by the Allen Foundation designed to recognize and support K-12 teachers who promote innovation and entrepreneurialism in the classroom.

The Better Together: CA Teachers Summit, is a collaborative event organized by New Teacher Center, and California State University (CSU) and the Association of Independent California Colleges and Universities (AICCU) with funding from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. To learn more, visit the event website at and follow it all in real time on Twitter:, #cateacherssummit

Education Groups to Sponsor Unprecedented Convening of California Teachers

By Pamela Van Halsema on June 8, 2015 3:17 PM

Unique partnership of California education groups assemble to celebrate teachers across the state at Better Together: California Teachers Summit

On July 31, California teachers at 33 locations across the state, including Sonoma State University, will come together to share innovative strategies that empower our PreK-12 teachers and build powerful teacher communities to positively impact our students. New Teacher Center (NTC), in partnership with California State University (CSU), the Association of Independent California Colleges and Universities (AICCU) and its member institutions, will co-host Better Together: California Teachers Summit, which is designed to help teachers learn from each other, share best practices in implementing the new California Standards and celebrate their work. The events are supported by $3.5 million in grants to NTC, CSU Fullerton and Loyola Marymount University from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

"California teachers know that the time to impact the lives of students is always going to be now," said Ellen Moir, Founder and CEO of New Teacher Center. "This event will allow 20,000 teachers to celebrate in classroom successes while building a powerful and lasting support network." 

As teachers prepare for the upcoming school year, Better Together: California Teachers Summit provides a unique opportunity to hear from nationally renowned speakers and give teachers a forum to share cutting-edge strategies and proven best practices led by teachers and for teachers. Teachers will come away with concrete tools and strategies for navigating recent changes in implementing the new California Standards, and a network of colleagues from their home region to support future collaboration. 

"California's teachers work tirelessly every day to make sure our students thrive," said Kristen Soares, President of AICCU. "This gathering celebrates their achievements and brings them back to their AICCU campus community to equip them with research based practices to ensure their continued success in a changing environment."

"With roots extending back a century to its teacher college origins, the CSU is honored to host this special day of professional collaboration," said CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White. "Through peer learning and exchange, California teachers continue to be at the forefront of classroom innovation - further igniting the spark of learning in their students."

All California teachers, teacher candidates and sch
ool administrators are invited to participate in th
summit. Events will be held at 33 locations through
out California and registration is free. For more
information or to register online, please visit
, and follow
#CATeachersSummit for up-to-date information.

All California teachers, teacher candidates and school administrators are invited to participate in this summit. Events will be held at 33 locations throughout California and registration is free. For more information or to register online, please visit, and follow #CATeachersSummit for up-to-date information.

"California teachers know that the time to impact t
he lives of students is always going to be now," sa
Ellen Moir, Founder and CEO of New Teacher Center.
"This event will allow 20,000 teachers to celebrate
in-classroom successes while building a powerful an
d lasting support network."

ieSonoma annual event to feature Emily Pilloton, Dan Pallotta, and Adam Braun: June 7-8

By Pamela Van Halsema on May 12, 2015 2:20 PM


A young woman whose first crush, MacGyver, sparked her love of constrained problem-solving and tinkering and led her to found Project H Design, a nonprofit teaching youth to design and build their future with heart, hands, and hammers.

A Harvard graduate who invented the multi-day charitable event industry with the AIDS Rides and Breast Cancer 3-Days, events that altered the landscape of options for ordinary individuals seeking to make an extraordinary difference.

A college student backpacking across the globe who asked a small boy begging on the streets of India what he wanted most in the world and whose answer would lead him to found an organization that has built over 300 schools serving over 30,000 students around the world.

What do these three remarkable individuals have in common? Aside from being called to action through their personal life experiences, these innovative leaders will be the featured speakers at an important community event taking place in Sonoma County on June 7 and 8, 2015. The third annual ieSonoma: innovate | educate event is scheduled for Sunday, June 7 at Sonoma Country Day School in Santa Rosa and on Monday, June 8 in Weill Hall at Sonoma State University's Green Music Center in Rohnert Park. Participants may choose to attend one or both days.

Get tickets from

ieSonoma events are intended to provoke attendees' thinking and challenge previously held beliefs about teaching and learning in the 21st century. Over the past two years, some of the best thinkers in the world have shared their ideas for innovation in education at ieSonoma: Sir Ken Robinson and Dale Dougherty in 2013, followed by Sugata Mitra and Nirvan Mullick in 2014.


This year, three dynamic speakers will take the stage: Emily Pilloton, Dan Pallotta, and Adam Braun. Each brings a unique story about how they have made a difference in their respective industry sectors by embracing innovation and challenging the status quo:

Emily Pilloton is an educator, architect, and humanitarian activist who believes that design and building can excite learning and citizenship. She developed and is now teaching a design-build curriculum called Studio H that engages the minds and bodies of high school students through real-world, built projects. Originally launched in rural Bertie County, North Carolina, Studio H is now based at REALM Charter School in Berkeley, California. Emily will be one of the keynotes for the Monday morning event.

  • dan_pallotta.jpgDan Pallotta is an entrepreneur, author, and humanitarian activist who is changing the way the public thinks about charity and change. He is best known for creating the multi-day charitable event industry, and a new generation of philanthropists, with the AIDS Rides and Breast Cancer 3-Day events. His 2013 TED Talk, viewed by 3.5 million people, argued that "the way we think about charity is dead wrong." Dan will be the keynote for the Sunday evening event, and will also be one of the keynotes for the Monday morning event.
  • braun.jpegAdam Braun is a best-selling author, entrepreneur, philanthropist, and founder of Pencils of Promise, a non-profit organization that builds schools and increases access to education for children in the developing world. His book, The Promise of a Pencil, describes how an ordinary person can create extraordinary change. Adam will be one of three keynote speakers at the Monday morning ieSonoma event.
  • With the three speakers' stories in mind, ieSonoma is adopting "A Call to Action" as its theme this year. ieSonoma 2015 promises to be an important public gathering of education and community leaders who are interested in transforming education and rethinking the way we view the institutions and organizations that play a role in preparing students for success in the 21st century.

    Additional details on the speakers can be found at A sell-out crowd of 750 on Sunday and 1000 people on Monday is expected for the event.

    About ieSonoma

    ieSonoma is a partnership of educational institutions and the larger community dedicated to exploring the research, theory, and practice of preparing young people for success in a rapidly changing world. In 2013, the Sonoma County Office of Education joined with Sonoma Country Day School and Sonoma State University to spark innovation and collaboration in the local education community. More than 25 other organizations are also supporting ieSonoma through sponsorship of this year's annual event, including:


    John Jordan Foundation


    Alexander Valley Vineyards, Community First Credit Union, Lake County Office of Education, Petaluma City Schools, Piner-Olivet Union School District, Quattrocchi Kwok Architects Inc., Santa Rosa City Schools, Santa Rosa Junior College, Sonoma Academy


    Bellwether Farms, Bergin Glass Impressions, CalStateTEACH, Career Technical Education Foundation Sonoma County, Community Foundation Sonoma County, First 5 Sonoma County, Girard & Edwards, Jardesca, Mendocino County Office of Education, North Bay Leadership Council, North Coast Beginning Teacher Program, Sonoma County Department of Health Services, Sonoma County Human Services Department, Whole Foods

    Additional support from:

    The Press Democrat, Vintners Inn, Wells Fargo Center for the Arts

    Call for Nominations for the 2015 Jack London Award for Educational Innovation

    By Pamela Van Halsema on January 13, 2015 8:59 AM

    The 28th annual Jack London Awards for.png

    "He was mastered by the sheer surging of life, the tidal wave of being, the perfect joy of each separate muscle, joint, and sinew in that it was everything that was not death, that it was aglow and rampant, expressing itself in movement, flying exultantly under the stars."
    Jack London, The Call of the Wild

    Inspired by London

    Local hero Jack London was a brilliant writer who pursued life with a sense of adventure much like the characters in his books. He took a non-traditional approach to living and learning, and embraced risk to spur his imagination.Tapping into those experiences, he was able to spin classic tales like The Call of the Wild, White Fang and dozens if not hundreds of other stories, novels, poems and plays.

    Here at Sonoma State it is London's rogue ambition and creative fervor that we memorialize in the Jack London Award for Educational Innovation program.  For 28 years, the award has celebrated exceptional programs and the creative people who took risks, energy and time to make them successful for the children of Sonoma County public schools. 

    Call for Nominations

    We now invite nominations for the 2015 Jack London Award.  Representatives from throughout Sonoma County are invited to nominate innovative programs for this honor. Nominated programs may serve early childhood, elementary or secondary education populations either as part of the school day or as an extra-curricular program. 

    Think about  what creative risk-taking is happening in the classrooms, labs, art rooms, playgrounds, gymnasiums and auditoriums at your schools. Have you launched any new and innovative  programs that build student engagement and advance learning? Tell us about them! Our advisory committee reviews all the applications and selects a few finalist programs for a team of judges to visit and evaluate in person.

    Nominations Due February 12

    Apply by Thursday, February 12, 2015; application is posted on our website at

    Direct questions about the Jack London Award for Educational Innovation to Pamela Van Halsema at 707-664-2132.

    Webinars Explore Making in Schools, Features Panel of Maker-Educators

    By Pamela Van Halsema on December 2, 2014 10:38 AM

    Making in K-12 Schools Webinars: Part 1, Wednesday, December 3 and Part 2, Wednesday, December 10, noon PST

    To join the webinars, go to

    2 webinars december 3 and 10 for Making in K-12 Settings

    Join School of Education Assoc. Professor Jessica Parker, along with several Bay Area maker-educators as they discuss the role of "Making" in schools.  Set up as a forum, these teachers will share stories from their own experiences in the classroom--from elementary up to high school--incorporating making into the curriculum and both creating and maintaining a culture of creativity

    In Part 1 of the two part series, on December 3, the panel will focus on how to set things up to foster hands-on, interdisciplinary maker projects and events which successfully support student learning.

    In Part 2, on December 10, they will discuss the kind of professional development that they themselves need as educators to implement these programs and adopt a 'maker mindset' as a teacher.

    The Maker Movement

    Making emphasizes learning-through-doing In a social environment. Maker culture emphasizes informal, networked, peer-led, and shared learning motivated by fun and self-fulfillment. Makers encourage taking risks and experimentation with materials from simple to high tech equipment, they set up opportunities to build and tinker and create. Robotics, woodworking, crafting, 3D printing, and machining are just a few examples of projects used in Maker Spaces all over the world top inspire through project-based learning.

    The notion of tinkering and Making has become popular world-wide and is now truly a movement capturing the imagination of young and old, across cultures and disciplines. Maker Media, based here in Sonoma County, has been the hub and helped build this movement around the world with their publications and their Maker Faire events.

    This global community consists of inventors, artists, engineers, and many other types of people with all kinds of backgrounds. This movement is taking many in the direction of successful independent creativity that is allowing for outside the box thinking and knowledge expansion and growth.

    This kind of thinking is a great fit for project based learning and creative problem solving curriculum in schools, as well as creative and artistic development.

    The Maker Educator Certificate Program

    This webinar is hosted and produced by the National Writing Project's Educator Innovator initiative (, and is affiliated with the Maker Educator Certificate Program offered by The Startup Classroom at Sonoma State University. The certificate program offers a selection of mini courses to help educators of all kinds (not just school teachers) learn how to start and maintain MakerSpaces in their own setting, and become part of a network of Maker Educators.  

    To learn more about the Maker Educator Certificate Program visit 

    Looking Through the Camera Lens: A Videographer's Nostalgic View of the Sonoma State's Global Cardboard Challenge

    By Casey Sears on October 27, 2014 2:38 PM


    Guest Blog Post by Russell Brackett, Sonoma State University Communications Major and Multimedia Communications Intern in the School of Education

    When I saw the Caine's Arcade video for the first time, I couldn't help but smile uncontrollably. Flashbacks to my childhood washed over me as I watched this amazing kid use his imagination to build something incredible out of nothing. This video tells the story of a creative kid from East LA who built an incredible pretend arcade out of cardboard boxes. It was heartwarming to see especially in this world of video games and nonstop technology.

    When I heard we were putting on our own Global Cardboard Challenge at Sonoma State, in response to the Caine's Arcade video, I instantly began thinking of ways to contribute to this movement to get kids to be creative and have fun in the process. I not only thought about ways to film this event, but also the things that I could build with cardboard! This was a great opportunity to help not only the kids, but myself as well by taking me back to my childhood days of imaginative play.

    Growing up, I was the type of kid who had to be told multiple times by my parents to get in the house for dinner. I'd always yell back "Just a minute!", but one minute often turned into fifteen before they physically would come and get me. I was often wrapped up in some imaginative scenario using random objects to build forts, cars, or weapons to fight battles to save a damsel in distress. This is why I was so excited because I remember getting lost in play on a daily basis as a kid and always having a blast! I waited in anticipation for the day of the Cardboard Challenge as I was hoping to relive some of something from my childhood.

    October 10th finally arrived and I woke up excited and ready. Our plan was to build a village out of cardboard. Once the first wave of children began pouring in with their amazing creations built out of old boxes, I again found myself smiling and feeling happy in the same way I did when I watched the Caine's Arcade video the first time. 

    Our event included preschoolers, elementary kids and college students who built houses, hospitals, and even trees for the village, made colorful with the splash of poster paint. Sounds of laughter and happiness could be heard throughout the makeshift village all day as more and more people poured in with their projects. 

    Rocket ships, hotels, buses, ice cream shops, and all kinds of imaginative ideas built by people of all ages filled the quad. I was focused on filming, but there were a couple moments where I had to step back, put the camera down, and just enjoy what was taking place.

    As a videographer, I film all day in hopes of capturing those moments that not only look good on camera, but most importantly evoke emotion in my viewers. Those moments were not hard to find that day as everyone who participated seemed genuinely excited to be there, and it showed in their body language and finished projects. 

    At the end of the day, I was exhausted but couldn't help smiling as I knew we had accomplished something great. That day will always serve as a reminder that no matter your age, it is important to step away and be creative just like when you were a kid.

    To read more about the event visit The Startup Classroom website. Check out my finished video story here: Global Cardboard Challenge Video

    Alumna Kaki McLachlan selected as 2014 PBS Digital Innovator

    By Lina Raffaelli on June 20, 2014 3:15 PM

    Kaki McLachlan at the 2013 Teacher Technology Showcase at Sonoma State

    Kaki McLachlan shares an interactive project at the 2013 Teacher Technology Showcase at Sonoma State

    As education is rapidly running to catch up with today's digital advances, institutions have begun to acknowledge and reward educators who are helping pave the way through useful and creative classroom strategies.

    PBS LearningMedia Digital Innovators Program is a year-long professional development program designed to foster and grow a community of ed-tech leaders. Each year PBS hand-selects 100 digitally-savvy K-12 educators who are effectively using digital media and technology in their schools to further student engagement and achievement.

    School of Education Alumna Kaki McLachlan, graduate of the Single Subject Credential Program and Master's in Education in Curriculum, Teaching, and Learning, has been selected for this honor for the 2014-2015 school year.

    "When students use technology in the classroom it allows them to take ownership of what they are learning," said McLachlan. "It is also an engaging way for students to gather up-to-date information in a variety of ways and share what they have learned in more exciting ways then ever before!"

    Kaki McLachlanShe acknowledges that all the new technology can be confusing for teachers. "New amazing resources are available each and every day for teachers. At times, it can be overwhelming, but it's not necessary to know it all!" Trying a new technology with students can be a risk, and doesn't always work perfectly. She notes, "It's important to remember, as a teacher, that not every lesson is going to be a success. This is especially important to remember when you begin to implement new projects with technology in the classroom. It is okay to fail! We are students too."

    McLachlan teaches science and technology to 6th-8th graders at White Hill Middle School in Fairfax. In addition to teaching life science, this year she took on two brand new technology elective courses focusing on digital citizenship and media.

    Throughout the year McLachlan will participate in various virtual trainings in educational technology. As a Digital Innovator, she is expected to lead several professional development activities in the 2014-2015 school year to share her innovations with other educators within her school and district 

    The PBS Learning Media Digital Innovators Summit was held in June, hosted at the PBS headquarters in Washington D.C. You can learn more about Digital Innovators by following the event on Twitter at #pbsdigitalinnovator and #pbsdisummit.

    Summer Technology Institute engages faculty with new tools

    By Lina Raffaelli on June 20, 2014 10:47 AM

    Faculty members across different departments discuss resources

    Faculty members across different departments discuss resources

    As summer break got underway, faculty and staff of Sonoma State gathered for the Summer Technology Institute May 20-22. Attendees spent three days discussing and engaging with educational technology tools

    The mantra of the 3-day session was "Ask, Play, Learn, Share!" This idea was developed in hopes of creating a stress-free environment for experimentation.

    The Summer Institute combined lectures, hands-on workshops and discussions all based around educational technology. Attendees were introduced to a variety of tools and platforms to try. Presentations included using Twitter to build a "professional learning network," ways to increase engagement using Moodle, and group participation using the Padlet web application. Faculty were also introduced to Google Drive and the opportunities for collaborative work, hybrid course development, and introductions to iMovie.

    iPad instruction

    Workshop included iPad instruction & classroom app integration

    Presentations and workshops were led both by School of Education faculty as well as outside sources. Speakers included Sarah Fountain, principal of Monte Vista Elementary School, Shira Katz from Common Sense Media, and Robin Mencher from KQED Education.

    Professor Michael Lesch said he was appreciative of the light-hearted approach to the workshop. Appreciative of both the structure and atmosphere at the institute, he noted "Jessica [Parker] was sensitive to our fears about technology." Other participants expressed similar sentiments. "For children today technology is just an extension of their identities," said Parker. "But for those of us who haven't grown up with it we need to adopt and share this mindset to help lessen anxiety," she said about the mantra. "We can't do it as separate individuals, it must be collaborative," she added.

    During the debrief on the final day attendees broke into discussion groups to consider the practical applications of the tech tools they'd learned. Anthropology professor Karin Jaffee put many of the ideas to use right away in her summer class. "I used a Google Doc to have students 'build' our first lecture by filling in a table with terms and answering questions I would normally answer in a PowerPoint presentation. I also used Padlet to get students to answer questions that I would also normally address with a PowerPoint. Both assignments resulted in much conversation among the students, who were divided into groups, and also allowed me to have a class discussion to highlight good answers and address problematic ones. And I've already received feedback from the students indicating that they like the increased in-class participation! I'm thrilled with what I learned at SOESTI and so glad I've been able to implement ideas so quickly and successfully!"

    Faculty member Erma Jean-Sims said she saw the potential for Padlet in her classes. "I like that it's instantaneous. Students are seeing and responding in real time," she said. "It could be especially helpful for getting more introverted students to participate, those who wouldn't normally raise their hands."

    The general consensus was that educational technology needs to be used in practical, purposeful and usable ways. It's important to strike a delicate balance between engagement and distraction for students. Robin Mencher of KQED summed up this idea by saying "technology is the vehicle, but not the driver," said Robin Mencher of KQED. Educators must be the facilitators to help guide their classes.

    Click here to view list of Summer Tech resources

    FREE Summer Science and Math Foundational Level Institute for Teachers

    By Lina Raffaelli on May 27, 2014 2:13 PM

    Student looking through microscope If you are a credentialed teacher who wants to teach math or science, Sonoma State University has just the program for you! This summer the School of Education at Sonoma State University is offering a Foundational Level Mathematics Institute at SSU, as well as two Foundational Level Science Institutes, located in Santa Rosa and Napa. These free programs are designed for teachers who currently hold a Multiple or Single Subject Teaching Credential and provides them the opportunity to add an additional credential.

    The Institutes offer both a content methods course and content review to prepare and assist teachers to pass the CSET's. Participants will earn 5 units of credit and will only need cover the cost of their own books.

    For more information about the Foundational Level Mathematics Institute, please visit Information on the Foundational Level Science Institute can be found at

    Both program application deadlines have been extended to May 30th.

    Napa Science Institute deadline: June 15th EXTENDED TO JUNE 30! We still have room!

    School of Education honors local educators and alumni at annual awards ceremony

    By Pamela Van Halsema on May 5, 2014 12:03 PM

    Assistant Superintendent of Special Education Ron Whitman

    Sonoma County Assistant Superintendent of Special Education Ron Whitman

    For over 20 years Sonoma State's School of Education has acknowledged alumni and community partners for their excellence in local education at the annual School of Education Recognition and Awards Ceremony.  This year's event is slated for Tuesday, May 13 at 5:00 PM on SSU's campus.

    The Circle of Excellence Awards recognize the accomplishments and contributions to the local education community by School of Education Alumni and community partners. Faculty members nominate alumni, mentor teachers, and friends of the program for this recognition. 

    This year's recipients of the Circle of Excellence Award include: Andy Gibson (Sonoma Valley High School), Tom Griffin (Casa Grande High School), Ron Whitman (Sonoma County Office of Education) and the mentor teachers at Santa Rosa's Kid Street Learning Center.

    teacher Erin Fightmaster in her classroom at Kid Street Learning Center

    Teacher Erin Fightmaster in her classroom at Kid Street Learning Center

    Professor Emiliano Ayala nominated Assistant Superintendent Ron Whitman for his support and ongoing collaboration with the Special Education programs at Sonoma State. "As a strong leader in our community, his colleagues offer high praise for his student-centered approach to decision making that upholds the mission of Sonoma County Office of Education," said Ayala. 

    Tom Griffin, department chair at Casa Grande High School, Petaluma, was nominated by Susan Victor, faculty member in the Curriculum Studies and Secondary Education department. "He has been a tireless advocate for English learners and a supportive mentor teacher for Single Subject teaching candidates," said Victor. 

    Strong teacher mentors play an essential role in the field experience component of SSU's teacher preparation programs, and both Andy Gibson and three educators from Kid Street Learning Center (Principal Kathleen Mallamo, Clare McKenzie and Erin Fightmaster) are nominated for their exemplary work supporting and mentoring new teacher candidates in the classroom. 

    In addition to the Circle of Excellence honors, the School of Education will present the Jack London Awards at the event on May 13, and acknowledge the recipients of two scholarships. Early Childhood Studies major Alyx Fritz will receive the Patricia Nourot Early Childhood Scholarship. Veteran science teacher Linn Briner will receive the F. George Elliott Exemplary Professional Renewal Scholarship, providing the funds for Briner to work on a M.A. in Education in the School of Education.
    Sonoma Valley High School teacher Andy Gibson standing outdoors with a group of his students

    Sonoma Valley High School teacher Andy Gibson standing outdoors with a group of his students

    The Circle of Excellence and scholarship recipients will be honored at the Annual Education Recognition and Awards Ceremony on Tuesday, May 13 at the Sonoma State Cooperage from 5-7 p.m. The event is free and open to the public.  

    The event is sponsored by The SSU Alumni Association, the SSU Office of the President, The California Faculty Association, The Sonoma County Educators Council CTA/NEA, the F. George Elliott Scholarship Fund and the Patricia Nourot Scholarship Fund. is free and open to the public.