Fall 2015 Course Descriptions

Hutchins' Upper Division major requirement consists of 40 units and includes the introductory courses LIBS 302 (for new Hutchins Transfer students), LIBS 204 (offered in the Fall semester), and LIBS 208 (offered in the Spring semester). These classes are generally taken in a student's first year in the Hutchins program.

LIBS 320 classes are elective seminars, and are classified in one of four Core sections—A: Society and Self, B: Individual and the Material World, C: Human Experience and the Arts, and D: Consciousness and Reality. Please note that the Core classes are grouped together in this document after all non-Core classes, rather than being listed in numeric order.

Revised 7/27/15

Upper Division Classes:

 


LIBS 204: MINORITIES IN AMERICAN CINEMA (4 units)

3931

F

1:00 - 4:40pm

Dr. Ajay Gehlawat

Ives 101


This course examines the fundamental beliefs, assumptions, and "self-evident" truths that serve as the foundation for American culture, and considers these in light of challenges provided by multicultural perspectives. Our primary focus will be on representations of racial minorities in American cinema from the beginning of the twentieth century till today. This course will fulfill GE area C1 and Ethnic Studies. [top]

LIBS 302: INTRODUCTION TO LIBERAL STUDIES (3 units)

2156

T

1:00 - 3:40pm

Margaret Anderson

Carson 38

1769

T

4:00 - 6:40pm

Dr. Stephanie Dyer

Carson 44B

1770

W

4:00 - 6:40pm

Dr. Francisco Vazquez

Carson 34


An interdisciplinary "gateway course" examining the meaning of
a liberal education, emphasizing seminar skills, oral and written communication, and introducing the Hutchins Portfolio. Successful completion of LIBS 302 is required to continue in the Hutchins program. Students earning a grade lower than a C will not be allowed to continue in Hutchins. [top]

LIBS 312: SCHOOLS IN AMERICAN SOCIETY (3 units)

1843

M

4:00 - 6:40pm

Dr. Benjamin Frymer

Carson 68


This course is an interdisciplinary examination of the American educational system. The course reviews the history of American schooling, philosophical issues that continue to shape its foundations, the effect of ethnicity, gender, class and disability on it, and the ways in which curriculum affects it. Appropriate readings and papers will explore these areas. In addition, students will perform 45 hours as volunteers in public school settings. This will allow students to complete their volunteer prerequisite requirement for the School of Education. Students will share their volunteering experiences with the class. [top]
LIBS 327: LITERACY,LANGUAGE AND PEDAGOGY (3 units)

1797

TH

1:00 - 3:40pm

Ianthe Brautigan Swensen

Nichols 173

2062

TH

4:00 - 6:40pm

Ianthe Brautigan Swensen

Carson 68


This course for pre-credential multiple subject students looks at the importance of literacy and language arts in the contemporary world, including the value of wiriting and literature in the classroom, as well as the significance of literacy as a broader educational and social issue. Students will develop a pedagogy of grammar, examine the use of literature and the written word in the classroom, and create and teach a classroom grammar lesson. [top]
LIBS 390: INDEPENDENT FILM STUDY (1-2 units)

Dr. Ajay Gehlawat

Consent of instructor required


Students will attend Sonoma Film Institute (SFI) screenings or other film-related lectures or events on campus. Students will earn 1 unit of credit for every 6 film screenings attended.  Students are also required to submit a written film analysis following each film screening.  Students must consult with their advisor to enroll in this independent study option.  Students enrolling in this course must have completed LIBS 320C "Intro to Film Studies/Film Theory and Narrative." GE subarea: C1

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LIBS 396: FIELD STUDY (1-4 units)

Contract Course

Must use form to register

Consent of instructor required


Field Study for juniors and seniors is a project conducted outside of the University classroom setting that is taken for credit/no credit. It may include work that is literaly outside in the field, or other hands on experience (e.g., a research study). Field Study projects are co-designed by a student and a sponsoring faculty member; or a faculty member may design a proect, with student participation soliticed. A student consults with a faculty member on the project and develops a plan of study including number of units, project outcomes, number of meetings with the faculty sponsor, and deadline for completion. A Project Contract is submitted to Admissions and Records after the beginning of the semester and before the last day to add classes. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: LIBS 101-202 or 302 and consent of instructor. [top]
LIBS 402: SENIOR SYNTHESIS (4 units)

1800

W

7:00 - 9:40pm

Staff

Carson 68


A capstone course required for the Hutchins major. Drawing on the papers collected for his or her portfolio, the student prepares a major paper and a Senior Project synthesizing aspects of that individual’s own intellectual development. Each student makes an oral presentation of his or her project at the end of the semester. Must be taken in the student’s final semester in the Major. [top]

LIBS 403: SENIOR SYNTHESIS - STUDY AWAY (4 units)

Dr. Janet Hess

Consent of instructor required


A capstone course required for the Hutchins major. Drawing on the papers collected for his or her portfolio, the student prepares a major paper synthesizing aspects of that individual’s own intellectual development. This is done in a study away situation. Also available for students choosing a minor in Hutchins. [top]
LIBS 410: INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-4 units)

Contract Course

Must use form to register

Consent of instructor required


Independent Study is an individualized program of study taken for a letter grade with a Hutchins faculty sponsor who is willing to supervise it. A student consults with a faculty member on a topic, develops a plan of study, including number of units, project outcomes, number of meetings with the faculty and deadline for completion. A Project Contract is submitted to Admissions and Records after the beginning of the semester and before the last day to add classes. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: LIBS 101-202 or 302 and consent of instructor. [top]
LIBS 480: TEACHING ASSISTANT - SEMINAR FACILITATION (1-3 units)

Contract Course

Must use form to register

Consent of instructor required


This course provides students with an opportunity to enhance their facilitation skills through serving as a seminar leader in large lecture/discussion courses. Requires the consent of instructor.
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LIBS 499: INTERNSHIP (1-5 units)

Contract Course

Must use form to register

Consent of instructor required


All students develop an internship working outside the classroom. Students also prepare a portfolio project based upon a larger topic implicit in their internship. They participate with other interns in an internship class once a week to discuss their internship experience and issues related to the larger society. Grade only. [top]

CORE A OFFERINGS 

Courses in this area address the following issues and themes:

  • Problems and possibilities before us at the start of a new century as we move toward a genuinely global culture.
  • The relationship between the individual and all kinds of human groups, the context of human interaction in which the individual finds many of the dimensions of the self.
  • Ideas, attitudes, and beliefs that flow between society and the individual and which result in the political and economic arrangements that make life-in-common possible.
  • Historical and economic developments, geographical facts, analytical models, and moral questions necessary to understand the dynamics of individuals and their communities.
  • Moral and ethical underpinnings of our patterns of social interaction and how these affect issues such as race, gender, and class.
  • Questions concerning whether the goals of human dignity, political justice, economic opportunity, and cultural expression are being enhanced or destroyed by specific historical developments, cultural practices, economic arrangements, or political institutions. For example: How, in the face of that compelling force, do we shape the kind of society that values and protects the individual? How do we become the kinds of individuals who understand and help foster the just society?
LIBS 320A.1: HEMISPHERIC AMERICANS (3 units)

1787

W

9:00 - 11:40am

Dr. Francisco Vazquez

Carson 34


As we enter a period of global economic, political and social transformation with its potential for violent cultural conflict it seems important for all people who share the same Continent of América (the Western Hemisphere, not just the United States) to look beyond their cultural differences. In this class we explore the forging of a shared identity through the struggles for political and economic rights and especially through the quest for human dignity. Starting with colonial times we learn how this struggle assumes different forms and how it continues to take shape today.

Prerequisite: LIBS 302 or LIBS 101-202

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LIBS 320A.2: TELLING STORIES: LISTENING, MEMORY, AND FORGETTING IN THE PRACTICE OF ORAL HISTORY (3 units)

1788

W

4:00 - 6:40am

Dr. Stephanie Dyer

Carson 44B


This course will examine the uses of oral history, which is the practice of interviewing people about their life stories and personal experiences as a way of understanding and interpreting that person's role in broader cultural, social, and political events from our shared past. We will examine how teachers can make use of oral history as a method of classroom instruction that brings history to life for students; how oral history has recovered the voices of marginal social groups left out of the mainstream historical record; and how the juxtaposition of various perspectives from multiple people's stories can intertwine to create complex narratives reflecting the richness and diversity of American experience. Students will learn oral history interview and transcription techniques and have the opportunity to apply these by conducting their own interviews as part of a research project.

Prerequisite: LIBS 302 or LIBS 101-202

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LIBS 320A.3: CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE(3 units)

1842

W

1:00 - 3:40pm

Dr. Hilda Mercedes Romero

Carson 30


What is the relationship between 21st century literatures and histories of the present? What can a focus on contemporary cultural forms and social content teach us about representations of common experience, good citizens, power, and everyday change, from the aftermath of protest and racialized domestic violences, to wars of empire, and global un/natural disaster? How do recent literary works create contemporary cultures, social and political order and achieve commercial and aesthetic value? In this course students will think about the dynamic relationship between literature and sociohistorical context in texts published in English over the last five years, including works by Louise Erdrich, Jesmyn Ward, and Phil Kay.

Prerequisite: LIBS 302 or LIBS 101-202

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CORE B OFFERINGS

Courses in this area address the following issues and themes:

  • Science and technology and their relationships to the individual and society.
  • The methods of science and important information that has been discovered through their applications.
  • Some of the crucial issues posed by our cultureís applications of science and technology and, adversely, the cultural consequences of a materialist world view.
  • How science and technology impact all areas of our lives.
  • How, for better and for worse, as inheritors of the Scientific and Industrial Revolutions, we intervene in our material world technologically.
  • Scientific aspects of particular social issues, or an issue of personal concern, the sense of science as a social endeavor.
  • The values implicit in a particular technology.
LIBS 320B.1: GLOBAL FOOD WEB (3 units)

1693

TH

9:00 - 11:40am

Dr. Debora Hammond

Carson 59


This course will provide a multi-faceted analysis of the system of food production and distribution in the modern world, and its implications for both human and environmental health. We will explore the global food web through a variety of lenses, including economics, politics, health, ecology, chemistry, aesthetics, and psychology. We will examine the consequences of industrial agriculture and developments in genetic engineering, as well as the recent emergence of farm to school projects in our local community, which are building stronger connections between schools and local farmers, and integrating food and gardens into all aspects the curriculum. We will explore a variety of perspectives on diet and nutrition. The course will include a service learning or community-based research component, and will hopefully add new meaning to the notion that “you are what you eat.”

Prerequisite: LIBS 302 or LIBS 101-202

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LIBS 320B.2: WATER MATTERS (3 units)

1818

T

1:00 - 3:40pm

Dr. Debora Hammond

Carson 59


As the most indispensable substance for all life on earth, water has played a crucial role in the creation and development of every human society. It underlies our most ancient mythologies and religions as well as our most basic political and economic systems. Today, the choices we make about the uses of this "Blue Gold" are increasingly critical to the future of both human civilization and the natural world on which it ultimately depends. This course is designed as an inter-disciplinary exploration of the changing meaning and use of water in various eras and cultures, including our own, and an examination of its pivotal role at present as the most vital natural substance capable of helping reestablish a healthy and balanced human relationship with the natural world.

Prerequisite: LIBS 302 or LIBS 101-202

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CORE C OFFERINGS

Courses in this area address the following issues and themes:

  • Why humans create literature, epics, poetry, drama, and other literary forms, the visual arts, languages, architecture, music, dance, the writings of philosophers, and the thought and literature of the worldís religions.
  • The inner world of creativity and individual values as well as the questions about how we arrive at a sense of meaning and purpose, ethical behavior, and a sense of beauty and order in the world.
  • Deep and significant aspects of ourselves which may otherwise remain obscure and therefore troubling.
  • Important questions - and occasional answers - about life and death, about feelings, and about the ways we see things.
  • The metaphors that help us recognize and become aware of the interrelations of all the areas of inquiry humanity has developed.
  • Images from which we may learn about our reality or realities of other times.
  • Creative and intuitive thinking processes that lead to an understanding of the aesthetic experience.
  • How the arts can be an end in themselves, as well as a means to an end.
LIBS 320C.1: CINEMA OF THE COEN BROTHERS (3 units)

1747

W

4:00 - 6:40pm

Dr. Benjamin Frymer

Carson 55


From Fargo to No Country For Old Men, the American filmmakers Joel and Ethan Coen have created a unique set of challenging, and sometimes disturbing, films exploring undercurrents of contemporary American life as well as major dilemmas in philosophy, ethics and film art. This course will introduce students to the major films of the Coen brothers, include classroom viewings of selected films, and utilize key readings and interviews to foster discussions about the major ideas and debates embedded in their cinema.

Prerequisite: LIBS 302 or LIBS 101-202

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LIBS 320C.2: A PEOPLE'S HISTORY OF ART HISTORY (3 units)

1748

M

1:00 - 3:40pm

Dr. Janet Hess

Carson 52


This course will examine the history of art produced by the majority of the American people, and often overlooked in histories of art: American Indian art and African American art. Music and dance, painting and sculpture, oral and written literature, and photography and cinema will be discussed in the context of theoretical paradigms related to historical experiences, including African antecedents, the Middle Passage and the wider Diaspora. Particular attention will be paid to the legal and social conditions of cultural discourses, to the expression of resistance and counter-narratives in the African American community, and to the status of African American art as—in the words of the African and diasporic historian Robert Farris Thompson—"a triumph of creative will over the forces of destruction." We will examine the commodification of the Native American through the study of white shamanism, local (California) cultures and "traditional" Native American cultures of interest to you, the historical burden of cultural genocide, the construction of the Native American in Hollywood cinema, and Native American counternarratives in cinema, literature, and art. Art produced by women has been neglected in art history, and this course will focus upon the contributions of women within a range of cultures.

Prerequisite: LIBS 302 or LIBS 101-202

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LIBS 320C.3: AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURES (3 units)

1820

W

1:00 - 3:40pm

Dr. Janet Hess

Carson 52


African American art will be explored in this course as an integrated cultural phenomenon. Music and dance, painting and sculpture, oral and written literature, and photography and cinema will be discussed in the context of theoretical paradigms related to historical experiences, including African antecedents, the Middle Passage and the wider Diaspora. Specific art objects, experiences and performances will be discussed in terms of the expression and negotiation of community and individual identity. Particular attention will be paid to the legal and social conditions of cultural discourses, to the expression of resistance and counter-narratives in the African American community, and to the status of African American art as—in the words of the African and diasporic historian Robert Farris Thompson—"a triumph of creative will over the forces of destruction."

Prerequisite: LIBS 302 or LIBS 101-202

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CORE D OFFERINGS

Courses in this area address the following issues and themes:

  • Reality as a result of many factors, some of them psychological, some biological, some philosophical, some social and the many aspects of being or existence as reaching from the physical to the metaphysical.
  • Consciousness as, somehow, the result of our gender, our ethnicity, our health, the ways in which we were reared, the social stratum in which we find ourselves, the beliefs that were engendered in us, and other factors.
  • Consciousness as occurring across a spectrum of potentials (conscious/unconscious, rational/irrational, egocentric/transpersonal, masculine/feminine) that influence our personal and collective realities.
  • Human needs at various levels of emotional, religious or spiritual, intellectual, and transpersonal or universal disciplines, practices, and experiences.
  • One of the major concerns of people in all places at all times has been: what are the components of being human?
  • The range of answers which are sometimes perplexingly inconsistent with one another, and yet their very divergence itself suggests something about the powerful complexity of the human individual.
  • The study of biology as it relates to psychology, and consciousness as it affects and is affected by perceptions of reality.
  • Meaning-making as a necessary human achievement, and identity formation as it is understood in the light of developmental psychology and the nature-nurture controversy.
LIBS 320D.1: THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF HUMOR (3 units)

1781

M

1:00 - 3:40pm

Dr. Eric McGuckin

Carson 61


This course will examine humor through the lenses of anthropology, psychology, sociology, and performance. Though we will sample the comedic arts, it will be no laughing matter.

Prerequisite: LIBS 302 or LIBS 101-202

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LIBS 320D.2: DEATH, DYING & BEYOND (3 units)

1782

TH

1:00 - 3:40pm

Dr. Eric McGuckin

Carson 61


"I don't want to achieve immortality through great works. I want to achieve it through not dying." - Woody Allen.

Confronting death can bring us fully to life. This course will examine biological dying, the sociology and psychology of death, and the spiritual dimensions of passing beyond through literature, art, film medicine, guided meditations, and humor. Written and experiential assignments will engage our analytic, creative, and spiritual minds. This course may be emotionally challenging. Field trips to be arranged.

Prerequisite: LIBS 302 or LIBS 101-202

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LIBS 320D.3: SITUATED SELVES: IDENTITY & OTHERNESS (3 units)

1864

T

9:00-11:40am

Staff

Carson 38


This course explores the concept of identity as it develops in the multiple contexts of our postmodern lives. Of special interest will be blended, and hybrid selves. For example, we will examine the self from the lens of social class, but especially look at how one's sense of self changes with the opportunity to move between social class statuses. We will study the psychological construct of personality and how it both remains constant and changes throughout individual developmental timetables. We will look at cultural selves, but especially focus on the border identities that emerge when individuals straddle different value and social systems. One question we might consider is: How much power do we have to choose who we are? In an age of "impression management" and social media, does creating an image of ourselves impact who we really are? Is there even a core self or a "who we really are?" To what extent can we choose what we believe and how we behave? These issues and many more will be raised and problematized during this seminar.

Prerequisite: LIBS 302 or LIBS 101-202

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