SPRING 2000 FIFTY-SECOND SERIES

WEDNESDAYS
         
Lecture at 4:00 PM in Darwin 108, Coffee in Darwin 108 Foyer at 3:45 PM 

M*A*T*H COLLOQUIUM




February 9

ALL OR NOTHING

 

Jean Bee Chan, Sonoma State University, will explore the quintessential question of experiments versus proofs.


February 16 DIVIDING POLYGONS BY LINES

Steve Chiappari, Santa Clara University, discusses how to divide a polygon’s interior into subregions by line segments emanating from vertices and passing through a point interior to a side. In this talk, he will discuss two related problems concerning the maximal number of such subregions possible under various conditions. In each case, he will produce a polygon with the maximal number of subregions.



February 23 CALCULUS TOOLKITS

Bill Barnier, Sonoma State University, will exhibit student work presented in the Fall 1999 MATH 180 class. Megan Appold-Peterschmidt, Jon Berman, Joshua Bragg, Bryan Davis, Vicki Dye, David Hasson, Angela Milano, Katryn Norvell, and Carmen Thompson will demonstrate colorful, easy to understand and enlightening interactive “toolkits” written by them using Mathematica.



March 1 RELATIONSHIPS AMONG TEACHERS’ BELIEFS, TEACHING METHODS AND STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT

Fred Utter, Mathematics, Sonoma State University, will discuss the results of an investigation which looked at associations among teachers’ pedagogical content beliefs, their approach to teaching, and student achievement in a high school Advanced Placement Calculus setting. He will focus on the statistics employed to measure and develop the categories used in classifying the data for this study.



MARCH 8 LINEAR OPERATORS: APPLICATIONS FROM CALCULUS AND DISCRETE MATHEMATICS

Dean Gooch, Mathematics, Santa Rosa Junior College, will give examples of how linear operators can be used to solve problems from calculus, differential equations and recurrence relations. He will reveal a general technique for finding the solution to where j is any nonnegative integer.



MARCH 15 USING INTER-RATER RELIABILITY TO ASSESS VARIABILITY AMONG CLINICAL INVESTIGATORS IN CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM CLINICAL TRIALS

James Robinson, Eli Lilly Pharmaceutical Company, will provide a brief overview of the general Pharmaceutical Product Development process and will focus specifically on the role statisticians play in the creation, testing, and approval of new drugs. He will also discuss how one can assess the variability among clinical investigators who participate in Central Nervous System (CNS) Clinical Trials.



MARCH 22 DYNAMICS OF MICROSTRUCTURE AND FLOW INTERACTIONS

Hong Zhou, Mathematics, UC Santa Cruz, will explain how many complex materials such as polymers and liquid crystal polymers are processed as “melts” in special geometries and flow, both for technical purposes and in natural biological functions. He will describe constitutive laws for flows of rod-like molecules and then apply the moment averaged equations of Doi and co-workers to probe interesting phenomena.



March 29 CROSSING THE THRESHOLD WITH NEURAL NETWORKS

Renee Renner, Computer Science, CSU Chico, will provide an introduction to artificial neural networks (ANNs), their foundations, development, benefits and limitations. She will further investigate ANNs as components of larger intelligent systems, with a look at specific applications, demos and issues surrounding minds, brains and machine intelligence.



April 5 MIDPOINTS AND SYMMETRY: NOT JUST YOUR AVERAGE PROBLEM

Alan Weinstein, Mathematics, UC Berkeley, will explore some geometrical averaging problems which are harder than they seem at first sight. What is the correct “average” of the vertices of a triangle? What is the “average” of a pair of nearby curves in space?



April 12 SPRING RECESS April 19

MATH FESTIVAL - THE EDGE OF THE UNIVERSE/NON-EUCLIDEAN WALLPAPER

Frank Farris, Mathematics and Computer Science, Santa Clara University, introduces the poincare Upper Half-Plane as a model of the universe with an edge. He will demonstrate the many properties of this space and will construct wallpaper for its inhabitants. He asks how this can be done if you and your measuring devices shrink as you approach the edge, making it infinitely far away? Knowledge of complex numbers is helpful, but not required for this talk.



April 26 BIG PICTURE MATHEMATICS

David Ballard, Mathematics, Sonoma State University, asks if science has science fiction, why can’t there be a corresponding mathematics fiction? After a rapid (Euro-centric) review of all mathematics, past and present, he will attempt to predict the look of mathematics 100 years from now.



May 3 SOLVING FIRST ORDER PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS USING CONTROL THEORY

Daniel Ostrov, Mathematics, Santa Clara University will discuss how the physics behind partial differential equations motivates a mathematical condition which enables us to select a unique solution to those PDEs. He will also present a control theory representation of this unique solution which can be used to select a unique solution even if the PDE’s dependence on space and time is discontinuous.



May 10 RIGHT-ANGLED TILINGS AND COXETER GROUPS

Rick Scott, Mathematics, Santa Clara University, will explain the concept of right-angled tiling. Given a 3-dimensional convex polyhedron P, he will show that a decomposition of 3-space into cells is a right-angled tiling by P if (1) each cell is (combinatorially) equivalent to P, and (2) exactly eight cells meet at each vertex. He will discuss the question: for which polyhedra P does there exist a right-angled tiling by P?



Parking permits ($1.50) are required Monday through Thursday 6am -10pm. No public parking is permitted in reserved spaces at any time.