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SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY
1801 East Cotati Avenue
Rohnert Park, CA 94928
(707) 664-2880

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SSU's impact goes far beyond the classes conducted for its full-time students. Its mission is spread throughout Sonoma County with programs that bring non-traditional students to campus and to off-campus locations, many of them staffed by volunteers. Additionally, the University's presence has a significant economic impact on the region.


JUMP
A community service program supported by the Associated Students, JUMP (Join Us Making Progress) offers students the opportunity to serve in numerous volunteer programs and gain experiences relevant to their education.

A few of the programs are Adopt-a-Grandparent where SSU students regularly visit seniors in convalescent homes; SOUP (Serving Our Unfed People) where students serve food to homeless people and build public awareness of the issues surrounding hunger and homelessness; and Cougar Club, an after school homework assistance program at Kawana School in Santa Rosa.

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ECONOMIC IMPACT
farmer's market
An economic research project, based on 2000-2001 fiscal data, estimated the net revenue impact of Sonoma State University on the regional economy was almost $213 million.
Since the “public investment” (defined as the State General Fund allocation and student fees) in the University was $65.9 million that year, we estimated that for every $1.00 of public investment, the University contributed $3.22 to the local economy.

The study further estimated that the University had more than 40,000 visitors in 2000-2001. Visitor expenditures contributed approximately $9.5 million to the regional economy.

Student spending contributed approximately $47.5 million to the local economy in 2000-2001. bookstore

With 1,460 people working at the campus, SSU is a major employer in the region. Due to the expenditures of the University, its employees and students, another 3,800 jobs were created in the community. Total jobs, both direct and indirect, attributed to SSU were 5,250.

SUPPORTING THE BUSINESS COMMUNITY
The Center for Regional Economic Analysis, in the School of Business and Economics, has become a well-respected forecasting service for the North Bay business community. Its survey data is published periodically in the Press Democrat.

The annual Economic Outlook Conference, sponsored by SSU and local businesses, has become a major annual event for businesses in the region.

OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE
An educational program designed for people 50 years of age and older, LLI has attracted a loyal following in the community. The courses are primarily taught by retired faculty from SSU and other Bay Area institutions. Retired Provost Bernie Goldstein and retired professors Dan Markwyn and Peggy Donovan-Jeffry are among the many popular teachers in this growing program. (See Extended Education.)

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WINE BUSINESS PROGRAM
grapes
In the past five years, the program offered 67 courses for wine industry professionals. (See School of Business and Economics.)

TECHNOLOGY HIGH SCHOOL
In partnership with the Cotati-Rohnert Park School District, SSU established a technology high school on campus. Located in the renovated Ruben Salazar Hall, the technology high school has completed its third year. With its project-based curriculum, the high school has received broad support from local technology companies and grants from philanthropic foundations.

SERVICE LEARNING
To enhance coordination of the University’s service learning courses, we established an Office of Community-Based Learning. In 2002-2003, more than 30 service learning courses were offered, integrating work experiences into the curriculum. For example, students in one Spanish class translated documents for a wide variety of organizations, such as Santa Rosa Memorial Hospital, the Sonoma County Nutrition Task Force, the Jack London Historical Society, the City of Petaluma, and the Lake County Air Quality Management District.

Twelve SSU students, all AmeriCorps members, provided more than 5,400 hours of service in support of community programs.

 

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GREENFARM

dancers
Greenfarm, begun in 2001 at Sonoma State, is a summer music and performing arts academy, providing hands-on, interactive learning for children from 5-18 years of age, from all backgrounds and with all levels of experience and talent.

Greenfarm is the arts education component of the Donald and Maureen Green Music Center and Green Music Festival. Underwritten by generous donors and organizations, the academy enrolled 450 students during the summer of 2002.

GREEN MUSIC FESTIVAL
greenmusic festival
The Green Music Festival was founded in the summer of 2000. More than 34,000 people attended festival events during the last three summers. The annual Independence Day on the Green draws an audience of more than 2,000 people.

jeffrey kahane
Jeffrey Kahane,
conductor and music director of the Santa Rosa Symphony, and a nationally known musician, serves as the artistic director of the festival. He has brought innovative programming and attracted up-and-coming new artists.


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IN THE K-12 SCHOOLS
The 3-1-3 program that SSU and the Cotati-Rohnert Park School District started in the early 1990s won the prestigious Golden Bell award in 1998 from the California School Boards Association. The 3-1-3 program is a rigorous year-round curriculum for “at risk” students with the goal that they will complete high school and college in seven years.

In 2000 Sonoma State established the GEAR UP program, receiving a $1.7 million grant over five years. It started with seventh grade students at Cook Middle School in Santa Rosa and is continuing with the same class, now enrolled at Elsie Allen High School.

During the past five years, SSU’s Upward Bound Program has averaged two or three high school valedictorians per year in Sonoma County. In 2002, an Upward Bound Math/Science student won a Gates Millenium Scholarship. These are all indications of the strong academic component of these programs for less advantaged youth.

TEACHER CREDENTIALING PROGRAMS
Teacher credentialing programs were started at three off-site locations: Mendocino Community College, West Contra Costa County School District, and Vallejo Unified School District.

 

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213,000,000
Dollar amount of SSU's revenue impact on the regional economy

47,500,000
Dollar amount of SSU student spending in the local economy in 2000-2001

9,500,000
Number of dollars contributed to local economy by vistors to SSU

40,000
Number of visitors to SSU in 2000-2001

34,000
Number of patrons who attended events of the Green Music Festival during its first 3 years

5,400
Total number of hours logged in service-learning programs by AmeriCorps members

5,250

Total jobs created by SSU directly and indirectly in Sonoma County

1,460
Number of people who work on the SSU campus

450

Number of students enrolled in Greenfarm in 2002

30+
Number of service-learning courses offered in 2002-2003

2
Number of Sonoma County high school valedictorians each of the past five years who have been in SSU's Upward Bound Program

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