Conduct Process

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You may receive a letter via email inviting you to make a meeting with a Conduct Officer to discuss the situation and tell your side of the story. While these meetings are not mandatory, they are highly recommended so the Conduct Officer can incorporate your information into their decision. Otherwise a decision could be made without the benefit of your input. You can schedule a meeting by calling the Residential Life scheduling office at (707) 664-2459.

These meetings are to help us determine who is and is not responsible for the alleged violation. Your name could have been brought up in a variety of ways and we still want to meet with you to complete our investigation.

Most conduct meetings will be with the A/RLC, the professional staff member in charge of your village. However, you may be meeting with another Residential Life staff member to discuss the incident. You can expect your Conduct Officer to get to know you a little bit and then want to hear about the incident. Be completely honest in these meetings and be prepared to answer questions about the incident.

If you are found responsible, you can always request a Student Conduct Decision Review. It will then be reviewed and a determination about whether it has merit to move forward will be made. If it does, you will likely be asked to meet with the Community Conduct Coordinator. You can submit a request for a Conduct Decision Review if your due process rights violated, meaning we did not follow procedure, the sanction is too severe for the violation, or there is new information available. Please reference the Conduct Decision Review sheet attached to your Sanction Letter for more information.

Inability to pay for the class does not change your obligation to complete the sanction. It is up to you to determine how to pay the fee associated with the workshop. You might consider talking with friends, parents/guardians, about your situation.   Associated Students also has a short term loan program available. Visit the  AS Business Office for more information.

The Housing Policies are located on the home page of the Sonoma State University Housing website.

Substance Abuse Workshops

Substance Use Level 1- Alcohol

The goal of the Level 1 Alcohol workshop is to discuss decision making and consequences, understand how familial and peer influences shaped their current views of alcohol, and establish an intermediate understanding of how alcohol acts on the body using the harm reduction model.  The workshop is primarily discussion based. Students explain what their previous experience was with alcohol before attending SSU, how their parents and peers view alcohol use, and they process their understanding of the experience that led them to the workshop. They are also asked to picture someone in their mind who they believe is or was using too much of a substance. The group members then list on the board, how those people have been affected and the behaviors they displayed. This provides for further discussion about how substance use can affect one’s employment or schooling. For the instructional portion of the workshop students learn through visuals and demonstration, about how blood alcohol content is determined, gender differences in alcohol’s effects, why binge drinking can be dangerous, how to recognize signs of alcohol overdose, and what to do in that scenario. Immediately following the workshop individual meetings are held with the facilitator to further process the information they filled out at the beginning of the workshop. This information includes age of first use, what safe use means to them, genetic susceptibility, and substance use behaviors.

Substance Use Level I

Marijuana The goal of the Level 1 Marijuana workshop is to discuss decision making and consequences, understand how familial and peer influences shaped their current views of marijuana, and establish an intermediate understanding of how marijuana acts on the body using the harm reduction model.  The workshop is primarily discussion based. Students explain what their previous experience was with marijuana before attending SSU, how their parents and peers view marijuana use, and they process their understanding of the experience that led them to the workshop. Students are also asked to silently take a quiz that covers the medical marijuana policy at SSU, the age group most likely to develop addiction, tolerance to marijuana and the brain’s adaptation, addiction as it relates to marijuana and marijuana’s harmful effects (physical, emotional, mental). The group then reviews the quiz together, generating discussion from each question. Immediately following the workshop individual meetings are held with the facilitator to further process the information they filled out at the beginning of the workshop. This information includes age of first use, what safe use means to them, genetic susceptibility, and substance use behaviors.

Substance Use Level 2

Students meet individually with the facilitator a minimum of two times to discuss the offense that occurred and to further address and educate on addiction, discuss their continued use after negative consequences, and address specific personal risk factors (behavioral, environmental, genetic). Students are asked to complete a homework assignment that includes either creating an educational brochure relating to the substance being addressed or by writing a letter about alcohol and drugs to their unborn child or younger sibling. Students then discuss with the facilitator, what that process was like and what they learned.

1:1 Meetings

1:1 meetings are provided for students who are unable to attend the scheduled workshops. Students who attend the workshop are able to continue conversations about their experiences related to substance use and their success at SSU during their 1:1 meeting. Referrals are made by Residential Life staff members, to check in with students that they have had concerns about. Those students are able to discuss how to be safer and how to recognize their dangerous behaviors. Referrals are provided for individual students to CAPS, an AOD support group offered by the counseling center, off-campus substance treatment programs, and Residential Life staff for further assistance.