Subject to Change Upon Arrival to Class


LIBS 420 POST MODERN ANALYSIS OF CULTURE
   Francisco Vazquez, Ph.D.
   Hutchins School of Liberal Studies                              Carson 59 (664-3l85)
   Spring, 1995                                                    Office Hours: T3-5; TH3-4       



COURSE DESCRIPTION

The objective of this course is to explore the concept of culture and the possible points of contact amongst cultures through the analysis of the relationship between knowledge and power. More often than not "culture" denotes or connotes some sort of Platonic idea, a mysterious, mystical land that only the "natives" can fully understand, an entity that we must respect and understand on its own terms. The aim of this course, on the contrary, is to understand cultures (and their complex combinations: intercultural relations, multicultural studies) as bodies of disciplines which are produced out of the specific and systematic interplay of power/knowledge relations.

The move from one position to the other is not an easy task for those who try to explain it or for those who are trying to figure out what is going on in the world. This is a result of the current transformation from an industrial to a post-industrial society; people found themselves in a similar situation during the shift from a medieval to a modern society in the 17th century. At the very least, however, it is crucial now to grasp what consequences are contained in these positions.



INTELLECTUAL LABOR AND CLASS FORMAT

1. Attendance:

since this is a seminar, attendance and participation are crucial.

2. Response papers:

each week you will write a 1-2 page response paper typwritten, double spaced. (see attached definition). I will record them and give them back to you; you will use them to help you write your essays and they will become an appendix to your essay.

3. Essays:

based on your response papers, readings, panel discussions etcetera, you will produce FOUR 4-5 page essays to which you will append your response papers. Each essay should show that you have reflected on the preceeding work and your final essay should be a reflection of the semester's work. In lieu of the fourth essay you may do a multimedia presentation.

4. Panel Discussions:

each seminar will consist of a panel of two students who will discuss their reactions to the material assigned on that day. Panelists will provide copies of a one-page typewritten outline to all seminar members.

5. Intensive journal:

in order to 1) develop a critical consciousness, 2) find out what your "operational interest" is and 3) keep a "checkbook" of your consciousness, you will be introduced to the intensive journal. At the end of each seminar you will be given time to write down your understanding of the issues discussed. Of course you should also make entries on your own so that you can see the relationship between your school work and your life work. Your journal is personal and you are not required to turn it in.


GRADING POLICY

A - This grade is reserved for truly outstanding performance in all aspects of the course.
B - Strong performance; above average.
C - Satisfactory grasp of course content and adequate performance on writing assignments and in seminar.
D - Below average performance.
F - Inadequate performance


TEXTS
(Available at Copperfield's Bookstore in Rohnert Park, 540 Raley Towne Centre, 584-4240 ask for Pat.)

--Natoli, Natoli, A Postmodern Reader
--Berger, Arthur Asa, Cultural Criticism: A Primer of Key Concepts
--Fillingham, Lydia Alix, Foucault: For Beginners
(RECOMMENDED)
--Vàzquez, Francisco H., Chicanology: A Postmodern Analysis of Mexican American Discourse Perspectives in Mexican American Studies


SCHEDULE OF ACTIVITIES
I.	1/30	Introduction to the course: analysis of power/knowldege/desire relations 
                through the intensive journal.  Video: Border Brujo.

II. 	2/6 	Reader:"White Privilege and Male Privilege"
		"I'm Black, Your're White, Who's Innocent?		
		"Postmodernism and the Discourse of Educational Criticism" 
		1.__________________2.__________________

III. 	13	Rosaldo, Renato.  Culture and Truth 
		1.__________________2.__________________

IV.	20	Rosaldo, Renato.  Culture and Truth
		1.__________________2.__________________
		First essay due.

V. 	27	Clifford, James, The Predicament of Culture
		1.__________________2.__________________

VI.	3/5	Clifford, James, The Predicament of Culture
		1.__________________2.__________________

VII. 	12	Deleuze, Gilles, Foucault
		1.__________________2.__________________

VIII. 	19	Deleuze, Gilles, Foucault
		1.__________________2.__________________
		Second Essay due.

IX.	26	Diamond, Irene  and Lee Quinby, editors, Feminism & Foucault
		1.__________________2.__________________

X. 	4/2	Diamond, Irene and Lee Quinby, editors, Feminism & Foucault
		1.__________________2.__________________

XI.	9	Said, Edward. W. Orientalism  
		1.__________________2.__________________


	13-17		Spring Break


XII. 	23	Said, Edward. W. Orientalism  
		1.__________________2.__________________
		Third Essay due.

XIII. 	30	Mudimbe,  V.Y., The Invention of Africa
		1.__________________2.__________________

XIV. 	5/7	Mudimbe,  V.Y., The Invention of Africa
		1.__________________2.__________________

XV. 	14	Reader:  "Postmodern Conditions: Rethinking Public Education"
		"Chicanology: A Postmodern Analysis of Mexican American Discourse"
		1.__________________2.__________________

XVI	21	Final Meeting: 8-9:50  p.m.
		Reader:  "Postmodern Conditions: Rethinking Public Education"
		"Chicanology: A Postmodern Analysis of Mexican American Discourse"
		1.__________________2.__________________
		Fourth Essay or Multimedia Project Due.