WATER WORKS IN THE CLASSROOM

A comprehensive list

School of Science and Technology
Dean Lynn Stauffer, Ph.D.
School of Arts And Humanities
Dean Thaine Stearns, Ph.D.
School of Social Sciences
Dean Elaine Leeder, MSW, Ph.D.

FALL 2012 + SPRING 2013

SCIENCE 120: “SUSTAINABILITY IN MY WORLD” -- FRESHMAN YEAR EXPERIENCE
Fall 2012 & Spring 2013 semesters

Created by a core team of faculty led by Physics Professor Jeremy Qualls, and funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation, this year-long course for first-time freshmen immerses students in real-world issues of environmental sustainability through hands-on work and outdoor field experiences at the SSU Field Stations and Nature Preserves. By design, Science 120 is an integrated course for students exploring their interest in the environment and considering a science major other than biology. 

Through real‐world problem solving done in collaboration with faculty, peer mentors, and community partners, students will learn biological principles, mathematical reasoning, and critical thinking skills to help understand and address global issues in the context of our local environment and Sonoma County’s watershed. Other members of the core team include: Lynn Cominsky (Physics & Astronomy), Nathan Rank (Biology), Brigitte Lahme and Ben Ford (Mathematics and Statistics), John Sullins (Philosophy), Claudia Luke (Director of SSU’s Field Stations and Nature Preserves) and Julie Greathouse (Student Services).

DEPARTMENT OF ART AND ART HISTORY
Professor Gregory Roberts, Chair

Art faculty and students embrace the theme of Water Works in several of the department’s advanced level classes, leading to work exhibited throughout the year.

  • Professor Stephen Galloway's Arts 498: New Media will be experimenting with sound, time and installation to explore the metaphorical and actual aspects of water.
  • Professor Kurt Kemp has created the commissioned poster and image that represents Water Works in print and digital media, including images on the Water Works website.
  • Additionally, students in the Studio Arts/Print Making program have, as in previous years, created poster art for the Department of Theatre Arts & Dance 2012-13 Season, which has Water Works as its theme.

 

FALL 2012

For FALL 2012 Water Works Academics, click here


 

SPRING 2013

GEOGRAPHY 340: CONSERVATION OF NATURAL RESOURCES
Professor Rheyna Laney
Spring 2013

This class explores how societies around the world manage their natural resources, focusing on two main resource categories: common pool and essential resources. Common pool resources (e.g. fish at sea) are particularly difficult to manage because these resources are ‘owned by all or no one’ and access to them is extremely difficult to control. An essential resource (i.e. water) is required by all, but expensive to make available to all. This course examines how three main ideological perspectives address challenges: state regulation; neo--‐liberal market mechanisms; and community--‐based management. Students consider issues of environmental sustainability, economic viability and social justice.

GEOGRAPHY 375: NATURAL HAZARDS
Professor Michelle Goman
Spring 2013

Natural hazards do not exist alone, but in reference to people. This course provides a survey of natural hazards in relation to human populations and activities around the world. The focus is on natural disasters generated by weather, climate, and geomorphic processes (such as hurricanes, landslides, tsunamis, and earthquakes).   Hazards related to global climate change are also explored. Basic concepts regarding risk assessment, hazard perception, population change, and impact on the built environment are studied. Prerequisite: Geog 204 or consent of instructor.

 

HISTORY 500: THE ART AND CRAFT OF HISTORY
Professor Steve Estes
Spring 2013

This graduate seminar explores the philosophical underpinnings and methodological tools of modern historical scholarship. We begin with the broad questions of why historians study the past and how it has been done over the last few centuries. Then we look at the methods employed by different historical sub-disciplines in studying regions around the world. Finally, we discuss the uses of history: museum exhibitions, historic sites, scholarly publishing, and commercial enterprises. By the end of this course, graduate students will have a solid foundation for choosing a thesis topic or research focus as well as the basic tools to execute first-rate historical research. I view history as straddling the divide between social sciences and the humanities, and so I hope that students will come to see that good historical scholarship marries the craft of research with the art of writing. This course includes oral history work on local watersheds and the SSU Nature Preserves.

 

KINESIOLOGY 101: PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND COPELAND CREEK STEWARDSHIP
Professor Bulent Sokmen
Spring 2013

Copeland Creek is a vital resource for SSU and the surrounding community. This course is designed to improve the health and wellness of SSU students through cleaning, gardening, landscape design, tree pruning, and hiking in the Copeland Creek area. It will provide them with a basic understanding of the local ecological systems through hands-on engagement, and it would provide a service learning opportunity for students to improve the environment at SSU and its surrounding community. This class will meet 2.5 hrs/wk.

 

SCURF
(Society and Culture Research Undergraduate Research Forum)
SSU Anthroplogy Club
Professors Alexis Boutin and Richard Senghas, Advisors
April 2013

The SCURF theme for 2012-2013 is Water Works. The Society and Culture Undergraduate Research Forum (SCURF) was founded in 2008 by the SSU Anthropology Club to give undergraduate students the opportunity to write, submit, and present original research in a professional conference setting. Students may choose to contribute a poster or oral presentation, which can be published in the annual SCURF journal (available for purchase on amazon.com). Majors from a variety of programs have participated in the past, including Chicano-Latino Studies, Global Studies, History, Human Development, Psychology, and Women and Gender Studies.