Fall 2014 Course Descriptions

The Hutchins Upper Division Major consists of 40 units and includes the introductory courses LIBS 302 (for new Hutchins Transfer students), LIBS 205 (offered in the Fall semester), and LIBS 208 (offered in the Spring semester). These classes are generally taken in a student's first year in the Hutchins program. LIBS 320 classes are elective seminars, and are classified in one of four Core Areas—A: Society and Self, B: Individual and the Material World, C: Human Experience and the Arts, and D: Consciousness and Reality. Please note that the Core classes are grouped together in this document after all non-Core classes, rather than being listed in numeric order.

Revised 4/14/14

Upper Division Classes:

 


LIBS 205: TOPICS IN AMERICAN CULTURE: CULTURES OF AMERICAN CAPITALISM (4 units)

TBA

F

1:00 - 4:40pm

Dr. Stephanie Dyer

Ives 101


This course will examine the nature of American capitalism, past and present, in order to understand the causes and consequences of the economic difficulties and opportunities we face today, and the lived experience of life in American capitalist culture. We will familiarize ourselves with major theories and philosophies of the capitalist system; read classic literature on the free market, class conflict, and the role of the state in the economy; learn about the cultural interconnections of our global economy, the rise of neoliberalism and its effects on diverse Americans; and consider meaningful ways of living in a world dominated by commodities and marketplace definitions of self-worth. This course will fulfill GE area C2.
[top]
LIBS 302: INTRODUCTION TO LIBERAL STUDIES (3 units)

1782

M

9:00 - 11:40am

Dr. Heidi LaMoreaux

Carson 44B

1783

M

4:00 - 6:40pm

Dr. Benjamin Frymer

Carson 55


An interdisciplinary "gateway course" examining the meaning of
a liberal education, emphasizing seminar skills, oral and written communication, and introducing the Hutchins Portfolio. Successful completion of LIBS 302 is required to continue in the Hutchins program. Students earning a grade lower than a C will not be allowed to continue in Hutchins. [top]

LIBS 312: SCHOOLS IN AMERICAN SOCIETY (3 units)

1862

W

4:00 - 6:40pm

Dr. Benjamin Frymer

Art 102


This course is an interdisciplinary examination of the American educational system. The course reviews the history of American schooling, philosophical issues that continue to shape its foundations, the effect of ethnicity, gender, class and disability on it, and the ways in which curriculum affects it. Appropriate readings and papers will explore these areas. In addition, students will perform 45 hours as volunteers in public school settings. This will allow students to complete their volunteer prerequisite requirement for the School of Education. Students will share their volunteering experiences with the class. [top]
LIBS 327: LITERACY,LANGUAGE AND PEDAGOGY (3 units)

1812

T

1:00 - 3:40pm

Ianthe Brautigan Swensen

International Hall 201A

2131

T

4:00 - 6:40pm

Ianthe Brautigan Swensen

International Hall 201A


This course for pre-credential multiple subject students looks at the importance of literacy and language arts in the contemporary world, including the value of wiriting and literature in the classroom, as well as the significance of literacy as a broader educational and social issue. Students will develop a pedagogy of grammar, examine the use of literature and the written word in the classroom, and create and teach a classroom grammar lesson. [top]
LIBS 342: HUTCHINS COMMUNITY ART SHOW PREPARATION (2 units)

1887

T

12:00 - 12:50pm

Dr. Heidi LaMoreaux

Carson 44B


This course will give students a forum to create a Hutchins Community Art Showing. During class time, students will choose the dates and venue for the art showing, secure the necessary venue, publicize the event, create a call for entries, process the entries, decide which entries will be shown, hang show, plan and conduct reception, take down show. [top]

LIBS 399: STUDENT INSTRUCTED COURSE: LITERARY MADNESS (2 units)

4203

T

1:00 - 3:40pm

Advisor: Dr. Benjamin Frymer

Carson 38


The mad artist, the frightening asylum, the mentally ill relative in the family closet, fear of a halfway house in the neighborhood, the mental patient's terror and desolation--all of these illustrate the the many perceptions of mental illness in literature. We will see how behavioral mores and sexual and domestic roles emerge as significant aspects of the literature of madness and how historically, authors show an increasing awareness of the psychological aspects of "mad" and abnormal behavior. This course will use fictional literature --short stories and excerpts from novels-- as well as first-person accounts to explore the psychological, emotional, and relational aspects of patient experiences. We will draw from the scholarly work of mental health professionals as well as the fictional works, memiors, and oral histories of those who have been deemed "mad." Conditions to be examined include schizophrenia, depression, bipolor disorder, and addiction. This class will enhance unstanding of how literature represents madness. [top]

LIBS 402: SENIOR SYNTHESIS (4 units)

1900

T

4:00 - 6:40pm

Dr. Nelson Kellogg

Art 108


A capstone course required for the Hutchins major. Drawing on the papers collected for his or her portfolio, the student prepares a major paper and a Senior Project synthesizing aspects of that individual’s own intellectual development. Each student makes an oral presentation of his or her project at the end of the semester. Must be taken in the student’s final semester in the Major. [top]

LIBS 403: SENIOR SYNTHESIS - STUDY AWAY (4 units)

Dr. Eric McGuckin

Consent of instructor required


A capstone course required for the Hutchins major. Drawing on the papers collected for his or her portfolio, the student prepares a major paper synthesizing aspects of that individual’s own intellectual development. This is done in a study away situation. Also available for students choosing a minor in Hutchins. [top]
LIBS 410: INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-4 units)

Contract Course

Must use form to register

Consent of instructor required


Independent Study is an individualized program of study taken for a letter grade with a Hutchins faculty sponsor who is willing to supervise it. A student consults with a faculty member on a topic, develops a plan of study, including number of units, project outcomes, number of meetings with the faculty and deadline for completion. A Project Contract is submitted to Admissions and Records after the beginning of the semester and before the last day to add classes. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: LIBS 302 and consent of instructor. [top]
LIBS 480: TEACHING ASSISTANT - SEMINAR FACILITATION (1-3 units)

Contract Course

Must use form to register

Consent of instructor required


This course provides students with an opportunity to enhance their facilitation skills through serving as a seminar leader in large lecture/discussion courses. Requires the consent of instructor.
[top]

LIBS 499: INTERNSHIP (1-5 units)

Contract Course

Must use form to register

Consent of instructor required


All students develop an internship working outside the classroom. Students also prepare a portfolio project based upon a larger topic implicit in their internship. They participate with other interns in an internship class once a week to discuss their internship experience and issues related to the larger society. Grade only. [top]

CORE A OFFERINGS 

Courses in this area address the following issues and themes:

  • Problems and possibilities before us at the start of a new century as we move toward a genuinely global culture.
  • The relationship between the individual and all kinds of human groups, the context of human interaction in which the individual finds many of the dimensions of the self.
  • Ideas, attitudes, and beliefs that flow between society and the individual and which result in the political and economic arrangements that make life-in-common possible.
  • Historical and economic developments, geographical facts, analytical models, and moral questions necessary to understand the dynamics of individuals and their communities.
  • Moral and ethical underpinnings of our patterns of social interaction and how these affect issues such as race, gender, and class.
  • Questions concerning whether the goals of human dignity, political justice, economic opportunity, and cultural expression are being enhanced or destroyed by specific historical developments, cultural practices, economic arrangements, or political institutions. For example: How, in the face of that compelling force, do we shape the kind of society that values and protects the individual? How do we become the kinds of individuals who understand and help foster the just society?
LIBS 320A.1: HEMISPHERIC AMERICANS (3 units)

1802

TH

4:00 - 6:40pm

Dr. Francisco Vazquez

Carson 34


As we enter a period of global economic, political and social transformation with its potential for violent cultural conflict it seems important for all people who share the same Continent of América (the Western Hemisphere, not just the United States) to look beyond their cultural differences. In this class we explore the forging of a shared identity through the struggles for political and economic rights and especially through the quest for human dignity. Starting with colonial times we learn how this struggle assumes different forms and how it continues to take shape today.

Prerequisite: LIBS 302 or LIBS 101-202

[top]

LIBS 320A.2: QUEST FOR DEMOCRACY (3 units)

1803

F

9:00 - 11:40am

Dr. Francisco Vazquez

Carson 34

 

This is a study of a historical and continental quest for democracy as manifested by English and Spanish Americans. Using three different kinds of analyses of power (liberalism, Marxism, discourse) and a comparative framework, we explore the historical presence and issues of major Latino groups in the United States and similar struggles currently taking place in other parts of the world. We examine definitions of politics, class, democracy, will of the people, colonialism, patriarchy, the State, global economy and their impact on issues like immigration and sustainability and, ultimately, on human bodies.

Prerequisite: LIBS 302 or LIBS 101-202

[top]

LIBS 320A.3: MIGRATION AND THE LITERARY IMAGINATION (3 units)

1861

TH

9:00 - 11:40am

Dr. Hilda Mercedes Romero

Carson 30


This course explores hemispheric American literatures of migration. It considers the politics of movement, from dispossession and forced relocation, to self-making and diaspora. We will consider experiments in form, narration and poetics to think through the boundaries of genre and storytelling practices.

Prerequisite: LIBS 302 or LIBS 101-202

[top]

CORE B OFFERINGS

Courses in this area address the following issues and themes:

  • Science and technology and their relationships to the individual and society.
  • The methods of science and important information that has been discovered through their applications.
  • Some of the crucial issues posed by our cultureís applications of science and technology and, adversely, the cultural consequences of a materialist world view.
  • How science and technology impact all areas of our lives.
  • How, for better and for worse, as inheritors of the Scientific and Industrial Revolutions, we intervene in our material world technologically.
  • Scientific aspects of particular social issues, or an issue of personal concern, the sense of science as a social endeavor.
  • The values implicit in a particular technology.
LIBS 320B.1: TBA (3 units)

1698

M

4:00 - 6:40pm

TBA

Carson 37


Course description to be added.

Prerequisite: LIBS 302 or LIBS 101-202

[top]

LIBS 320B.2: MACHINE AS METAPHOR (3 units)

1836

T

9:00 - 11:40am

Dr. Nelson Kellogg

Carson 60


Mechanization and automation, concepts born of the industrial revolution, continue to dominate our lives and economic means of production well into the information age. We need to understand the human fascination with the construction of devices and the aesthetic of the artificial if we are to avoid greater "dis-integration" with our present and future roles in society. This course will survey the spectrum of responses to the artificial landscape in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, from the "Zen of machine" consciousness of the practitioner to the fearful jeremiad of the alienated observer. Several up-close class activities with both the artist's and gadgeteer's perspectives will complete the reconnaissance.

Prerequisite: LIBS 302 or LIBS 101-202

[top]

LIBS 320B.3: THE BIASED BRAIN: PERCEPTION & INTERPRETATION (3 units)

1837

W

4:00 - 6:40pm

Dr. Wendy Ostroff

Carson 37


Course description to be added.

Prerequisite: LIBS 302 or LIBS 101-202

[top]

CORE C OFFERINGS

Courses in this area address the following issues and themes:

  • Why humans create literature, epics, poetry, drama, and other literary forms, the visual arts, languages, architecture, music, dance, the writings of philosophers, and the thought and literature of the worldís religions.
  • The inner world of creativity and individual values as well as the questions about how we arrive at a sense of meaning and purpose, ethical behavior, and a sense of beauty and order in the world.
  • Deep and significant aspects of ourselves which may otherwise remain obscure and therefore troubling.
  • Important questions - and occasional answers - about life and death, about feelings, and about the ways we see things.
  • The metaphors that help us recognize and become aware of the interrelations of all the areas of inquiry humanity has developed.
  • Images from which we may learn about our reality or realities of other times.
  • Creative and intuitive thinking processes that lead to an understanding of the aesthetic experience.
  • How the arts can be an end in themselves, as well as a means to an end.
LIBS 320C.1: CITIES, SUBURBS, VULNERNABILITY (3 units)

1757

TH

1:00 - 3:40pm

Dr. Hilda Mercedes Romero

Carson 10


In this seminar we will explore place making, aesthetics, and narration as practices that inform everyday urban and suburban life, and the vulnerable geographies of social difference (race, class`, gender, sexuality). We will interpret sub/urban landscapes and narratives to think critically about fragmentation, mobility, and space, and to consider the implications of the built environment across a range of historic and cultural texts.

Prerequisite: LIBS 302 or LIBS 101-202

[top]

LIBS 320C.2: ART HISTORY (3 units)

1758

M

1:00 - 3:40pm

Dr. Janet Hess

Carson 44B


Course description to be added.

Prerequisite: LIBS 302 or LIBS 101-202

[top]

LIBS 320C.3: BARBIES (3 units)

1838

W

1:00 - 3:40pm

Dr. Janet Hess

Carson 52


In Western society the Barbie is an icon of feminine sexuality, a site simultaneously of innocence and desire, commodification and psychological projection, the fetishization of gender ideals and the construction and perpetuation of the feminine "mystique." What is the power of Barbie? Why do we adore her? How do we resolve the apparent conflict between damage and play/desire? Does Barbie reveal, as her creator Ruth Handler argues, "the endless possibilities available [to young girls] . . . encouraging them to actively use their imagination" to interpret the adult world and "work through growing up to explore their dreams and their future?" Or do Barbies replicate an oppressive gender hierarchy?

In this class we will explore these and other questions, using Barbie as an opportunity to explore the manner in which gender is constructed, commodified, and disseminated, the role of play in indoctrination and social formation, and the power of individual agency and resistance discourse in interrupting fixed social and political narratives. We will also consider the possibility of Barbie as a phenomenon beyond assessments of "good" or "bad"--as a performance phenomenon beyond irony, open to our own interpretation, objective, and desire.

Prerequisite: LIBS 302 or LIBS 101-202

[top]

CORE D OFFERINGS

Courses in this area address the following issues and themes:

  • Reality as a result of many factors, some of them psychological, some biological, some philosophical, some social and the many aspects of being or existence as reaching from the physical to the metaphysical.
  • Consciousness as, somehow, the result of our gender, our ethnicity, our health, the ways in which we were reared, the social stratum in which we find ourselves, the beliefs that were engendered in us, and other factors.
  • Consciousness as occurring across a spectrum of potentials (conscious/unconscious, rational/irrational, egocentric/transpersonal, masculine/feminine) that influence our personal and collective realities.
  • Human needs at various levels of emotional, religious or spiritual, intellectual, and transpersonal or universal disciplines, practices, and experiences.
  • One of the major concerns of people in all places at all times has been: what are the components of being human?
  • The range of answers which are sometimes perplexingly inconsistent with one another, and yet their very divergence itself suggests something about the powerful complexity of the human individual.
  • The study of biology as it relates to psychology, and consciousness as it affects and is affected by perceptions of reality.
  • Meaning-making as a necessary human achievement, and identity formation as it is understood in the light of developmental psychology and the nature-nurture controversy.
LIBS 320D.1: INNER GEOGRAPHIES (3 units)

1796

W

9:00 - 11:40am

Dr. Heidi LaMoreaux

Carson 44B


In this class, we will look at the connections between the personal and the geographic. This course will examine the self and our personal histories using the ideas, tools, and methods commonly used in geography – including mapping, coring, pattern analysis, and spatial analysis. This class will use both writing and artistic techniques to examine ideas of space and place, and to create a series of maps of our interior and exterior worlds. We will also use geomorphic process concepts like erosion, sedimentation, and geologic history as metaphors to examine the internal and external forces that have molded us into the person we are. We will seminar on these ideas and create weekly projects to share in class. A paper and/or project, which will be largely autobiographical, will be required at the end of the semester. At least one weekend field trip may also be required.

Prerequisite: LIBS 302 or LIBS 101-202

[top]

LIBS 320D.2: DEATH, DYING & BEYOND (3 units)

1797

TH

1:00 - 3:40pm

Dr. Eric McGuckin

Carson 61


"I don't want to achieve immortality through great works. I want to achieve it through not dying." - Woody Allen.

Confronting death can bring us fully to life. This course will examine biological dying, the sociology and psychology of death, and the spiritual dimensions of passing beyond through literature, art, film medicine, guided meditations, and humor. Written and experiential assignments will engage our analytic, creative, and spiritual minds. This course may be emotionally challenging. Field trips to be arranged.

Prerequisite: LIBS 302 or LIBS 101-202

[top]

LIBS 320D.3: THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF HUMOR (3 units)

1883

TH

9:00-11:40am

Dr. Eric McGuckin

Carson 61


This course will examine humor through the lenses of anthropology, psychology, sociology, and performance. Though we will sample the comedic arts, it will be no laughing matter.

Prerequisite: LIBS 302 or LIBS 101-202

[top]