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Sonoma State University

LITERACY STUDIES AND ELEMENTARY EDUCATION (LSEE)


Department Office
Stevenson 1078
(707) 664 3238
fax (707) 664 2483

Administrative Coordinator
Leslie Mouton

Department Chair
MaryAnn Nickel
(707) 664 2082

Faculty
Paul Crowley, Johanna Filp, Ellie Galvez-Hard, Sharon Janulaw, Hee-Won Kang, Paula Lane, Virginia Lea, Charlene Morita, Kathy Morris, MaryAnn Nickel, Lisa Pollack, Rich Svendsen

Multiple Subject CLAD Program Emphases / Multiple Subject CLAD Early Childhood Emphasis Program Courses / Master of Arts in Education: Early Childhood Education Concentration / Early Childhood Individual Course Descriptions / Education Course Descriptions / Graduate Course Descriptions / Master of Arts in Education with a concentration in Reading and Language / Multiple Subject Courses (EDMS)


The goal of the Department of Literacy Studies and Elementary Education is to prepare teachers to play a vital role in California public schools. The diversity of our school population in terms of culture, social class, gender, language, and race is a significant focus of our coursework and field experiences.

The University and the school districts within our service area view teacher education as a shared responsibility. The University provides a broad base of information about research and theory necessary for teaching, while school districts provide the classrooms for field experiences and student teaching. Collaboration between university-based teacher educators and school district teachers provides a strong foundation for the program's goal of excellence.

Credentials Office

The Credentials Office serves as the admissions and records center for all programs offered in the School of Education and is responsible for the recommendation of teaching and service credentials. Credentials analysts and staff are available for providing application information and credential information to prospective students, continuing students, out of state teachers/administrators, University constituents, and the University service area in general.

Programs offered in the Department of Literacy Studies and Elementary Education

The Department of Literacy Studies and Elementary Education offers the following credentials: Multiple Subject, Multiple Subject Bilingual (Spanish), Multiple Subject Ukiah Outreach, Early Education Emphasis Certificate (an advanced University-based certificate), MA in Education with an emphasis in Reading and Language Education, Reading Certificate (an advanced credential), and a Reading and Language Arts Specialist Credential.

Multiple Subject Teaching Credential Programs

This credential authorizes the holder to teach in a self-contained classroom preschool through grade 12. It is most frequently used for teaching in elementary classrooms and early childhood settings.

Students pursuing the Multiple Subject CLAD Credential may select from among the approved teaching credential subject matter preparation programs within the following departments:
Chicano and Latino Studies (CALS)
Nichols Hall 214, (707) 664-2369
Environmental Studies
Rachel Carson Hall 18, (707) 664-2306
Hutchins School of Liberal Studies
Rachel Carson Hall 44, (707) 664-2419
American Multicultural Studies
Nichols Hall 214, (707) 664-2486

Multiple Subject (CLAD) Program Emphasis

The Multiple Subject CLAD/BCLAD emphasis areas offer a 12-month program that includes summer school and two academic semesters.

The Multiple Subject program is based on the belief that learning to teach requires building a professional knowledge base honed by practice in varied classroom settings. Thus, our curriculum integrates coursework with field study in order to develop practical theory and to promote collaboration between the university and the public schools.

Multiple Subject

The Multiple Subject emphasis prepares candidates to teach in self-contained classrooms with significant populations of students who are learning English as a second language in grades K-12. This program prepares candidates to provide instruction for language development and subject matter content in English. Because self-contained classes are located primarily in elementary schools, professional coursework and field experiences focus on elementary classrooms.

The basic authorization to teach in the California public schools requires the following:

  1. Possession of a bachelor's degree.
  2. Verification of appropriate subject matter competency, either an approved subject matter preparation program or passage of appropriate state-approved examination(s).
  3. Submission of scores for the California Basic Education Skills Test for teachers (CBEST).
  4. Completion of a college-level course or college-level examination that covers the U.S. Constitution. POLS 200 or 202 at SSU will meet the requirement.
  5. Completion of CSET exam.
  6. Filing of the application for a Certificate of Clearance, which includes fingerprinting.

Completion of the requirements listed above will allow an individual to obtain a preliminary basic teaching credential. A professional clear teaching credential will be recommended by the University upon completion of an approved fifth year of study (30 units beyond the bachelor's degree) that includes requirements in health education/drug abuse, mainstreaming, computer education, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).

Note: Contact the Credentials office for the latest information regarding legislative changes in the basic credential programs. Students should consult with the Credentials office and the program advisor during their first semester on campus if they plan to pursue a credential.

Requirements for Admission to the Multiple Subject Credential Program

The following information applies to individuals applying to become a credential candidate in either CLAD or BCLAD. The procedures for applying to the Intern program or the Ukiah Outreach MS Credential Program can be obtained by contacting the Credentials Office.

Multiple Subject Candidates are admitted in fall or spring. Bilingual Multiple Subject Candidates are admitted only in the spring. All candidates must complete the following before admission to the program:

  1. Admission to the University.
  2. Proof of application to the University with your program application.
  3. Grade point average of 2.75 in upper-division and/or graduate coursework or a 2.67 overall grade point average.
  4. Submission of scores for California Basic Educational Skills Test (CBEST) by the end of Phase I.
  5. A minimum of 40 hours of documented, supervised field experience. (Please see Prerequisite Field Experience Requirement Documentation form for details.)
  6. Successful completion of an admissions interview.
  7. Demonstration of aptitude, personality, and character traits that satisfy the standards of the teaching profession. Assessment of these qualities will be made through evaluation of interviews, letters of recommendation, and candidates' professional goals statements.
  8. Proof of Registration for the California Subject Examinations for Teachers or CSET exam.

The Credentials office provides information regarding standards and dates for application to programs in the School of Education. Some Candidates may be admitted to basic teaching credential programs who have not met one or more of the above requirements when such Candidates have compensating strengths in other required areas.

Note: Additional program-specific admission requirements are listed with each program description.

Procedures for Admission to Basic Teaching Credential Preparation Programs

The Credentials office provides information regarding standards and dates for application to programs in the School of Education.

  1. Apply for admission directly to the Credentials office, School of Education. Application packets and additional information may be obtained from the Credentials office, Stevenson 1078.
  2. Submit to the Credentials office two official transcripts from each college/university attended. (Check with the office of admissions and records regarding additional official transcripts required for admission to the University.)
  3. Submit verification of supervised field experience.
  4. Submit three letters of recommendation.

Continuation in Basic Teaching Credential Preparation Programs

  1. 1. During the first semester, all candidates must:
    1. Provide evidence from a physician of a clear chest x-ray or negative TB skin test; and
    2. Apply for a Certificate of Clearance. Application forms are available in the Credentials office.
    3. Pass CSET by the end of Phase I.
  2. All education students are required to meet each semester with an education advisor.
  3. Students must successfully complete all requirements for each program phase, including coursework, fieldwork, and student teaching before entering the subsequent phase.
  4. Students are expected to make continuous progress toward the credential while maintaining a grade point average of 3.00 in professional education courses after entry into the credential program. Incomplete grades (I) and grades of C-, D or F in professional education courses must be removed and statutory requirements met prior to continuing enrollment in courses.
  5. Candidates who must delay progress in the professional education program may file a written request with the Department Chair for an extended program or for a leave of absence. A student returning from a program delay will be subject to the screening requirements in effect at the time of reentry and will be accommodated as space allows. Any student on academic probation is subject to automatic disqualification as a credential candidate.

I. SB2042 Multiple Subject Program Courses

The Department of Literacy Studies and Elementary Education offers a Multiple Subject Emphasis Certificate providing professional preparation for aspiring teachers to play a vital role in California public schools. The diversity of our school population in terms of culture, social class, gender, language, and race is a significant focus of our coursework and field experiences. Upon completing the program, Candidates will have both breadth and depth of knowledge about teaching and learning, and Candidates will be capable of making informed decisions in diverse settings. The design of Sonoma State University's Multiple Subject Professional Teacher Preparation Program is based on models of learning, human development, and interaction supported by current policy, research and practice. The program is developmental and sequential.

Prerequisites and Co-requisites

The prerequisites/CO-requisites are offered in the summer and can be taken before admission into the program or any time after program admission.

EDUC 417 School and Society, or approved alternative (3)
EDMS 420 Child Development in Family, School, and Community (3)
EDMS 470 Multicultural Pedagogy (3)
Total Prerequisite units for all MS Program . . . . 9

Phase I
All Phase I courses require admission to the Multiple Subject Program or the Special Education Program. Courses are grade only.

EDMS 411 Second Language Pedagogy (3)
EDMS 463 Teaching Reading & Language Arts to Beginning Learners (3)
EDMS 474 Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School (3)
EDMS 475 Teaching Science in the Elementary School (3)
EDMS 476F Participant Observation (3 units)
EDMS 476S Participant Observation Seminar (1) Prerequisite: Enrolled in EDMS 476F

Total Phase I units 16

Phase II

EDMS 464 Teaching Reading to Struggling Learners and Older Students (2)
EDMS 471 Teaching Social Science in a Multicultural Society (2)
EDMS 482F Student Teaching and Seminar (10)
EDMS 482S Student Seminar (2) Concurrent with 482F

Total Phase II units 16
Total Program 32

II. SB2042 Multiple Subject BCLAD Program Courses

English language development and bilingual teachers are now central to staffing California's schools. With the introduction of a combined Bilingual Cross-cultural Language and Academic Development (BCLAD) credential, many more teachers will enter the profession with the basic knowledge necessary to meet the needs of California's diverse student population. The BCLAD program at Sonoma State has a Spanish language emphasis reflecting the demographics of Sonoma State University's service area. The program authorizes the candidate to provide instruction for English language development, specially designed content instruction delivered in English, primary language development, and content instruction delivered in Spanish.

The Department of Literacy Studies and Elementary Education offers a BCLAD (Bilingual Spanish) Emphasis Certificate providing professional preparation to teach at Kindergarten through grade 12 in self-contained Spanish bilingual programs. BCLAD candidates must fulfill all the same program admission requirements and demonstrate proficiency in the target language for which they seek authorization (Spanish) by taking a target language assessment test that will assess the candidate's ability in listening, comprehension, speaking ability, reading comprehension and fluency, and grammar and writing ability. The criterion for entry into the program prior to admission in all of the above areas is 2.5 or above on the Foreign Service Institute (FSI) scale (or equivalent). The criterion for exit and final authorization is FSI 3.0 prior to full time student teaching.

SSU SB2042 MS/BCLAD

Prerequisites or CO-requisites

1. Foundations of Education: Child Development School and Society

Required Course(s):
EDUC 417: School and SocietyorLIBS 312: Schools in American Society (Hutchins waiver program)(3)
EDMS 420: Child Development in the Family, School, and Community (3)

2. A Basic Understanding of Issues Related to Bilingual Education

Recommended course(s):
Content infused in EDUC 417 or LIBS 312; infused also in EDMS 411, EDMS 471, and EDMS 480B (Phase I); infused also in EDMS 464 and EDMS 482S (Phase II)

Alternative coursework will be reviewed for equivalence

3. Knowledge of the Target Culture

Recommended Course(s):
CALS 451: Chicano/Latino Humanities (4)
Content also infused in EDMS 480B

Alternative coursework will be reviewed for equivalence

4. Language qualifications

Phase I

EDMS 411Teaching Second Language Learners(3)
EDMS 463Teaching Reading and Language Artsto Younger Students (3)
EDMS 474 Mathematics in the Elementary School(3)
EDMS 475Science in the Elementary School(3)
EDMS 476FParticipant Observation --Bilingual Placement(3)
EDMS 480BIntegrated Curriculum in the Elementary (2)

Phase II

EDMS 464BTeaching Reading and Language Arts to Older Students and Struggling Readers (2)
EDMS 471Teaching Social Studies in a Multicultural Society(2)
EDMS 482FStudent Teaching--Bilingual Placement(10)
EDMS 482SStudent Teaching Seminar (BCLAD emphasis)(2)

Total 33

Notes:
1. Classes are integrated with MS SB2042 and BCLAD students unless otherwise noted.
2. Waiver program must be completed or CSET: Multiple Subjects passed prior to Student Teaching; effective Spring 2005, CSET: Multiple Subjects must be passed prior to admission.
3. BCLAD candidates must achieve a 2.5 FSI in Spanish prior to Phase I; 3.0 FSI prior to Student Teaching and award of the credential.

III. Multiple Subject Ukiah Outreach

IV. Intern Program

Student teaching while employed in a school program is permitted, contingent upon approval of the multiple subject chairperson and the intern coordinator. The intern coordinator is available to assist prospective interns in each of the following application and program steps.

Intern Process

As part of the approval process a student must be:

  • Formally admitted to the University
  • Formally admitted to the Multiple Subject Program
  • In good academic standing

An application, initiated by the student, must be made to the chairperson and must include:

  • Name of the school site person responsible for supervising the student teacher in the classroom
  • Statement of expected competencies, as outlined in the Handbook, the criteria for their demonstration, and a time commitment of no less than that of a non-paid student teacher
  • Definition of the role and responsibilities of the university supervisor, the student teacher, and the site supervisor (in lieu of the mentor teacher) as outlined in the Handbook
  • Calendar of formal evaluation to be carried out jointly by the university supervisor, the school-site supervisor and the student.

Recommendation of the individual who is student teaching in a paid situation is not automatic; all appropriate standards as outlined in the Handbook must be met before the credential will be recommended.

Early Childhood Programs

I. Early Education Emphasis Certificate

The Department of Literacy Studies and Elementary Education offers an Early Education Emphasis Certificate providing professional preparation to teach at the preschool level in California State funded programs for teachers who have earned the Multiple Subject (Elementary Education) Credential. The latter Credential is for Kindergarten through grade 8. This proposed Certificate will replace the Elementary School Teaching Credential with Emphasis in Early Childhood Education (CLAD Multiple Subject/ECE Emphasis Credential), which has been offered in the past.

Candidates for the Early Education Emphasis Certificate may take the following three courses after or during their course of study for the Multiple Subject Preliminary Credential. Students who do not earn a Multiple Subject Preliminary Credential may apply these courses to the Child Development Permit matrix currently in effect for California State funded preschool and school-age childcare certification. Please contact Dr. Johanna Filp-Hanke (664-2280) for more information.

Existing Multiple Subject Preliminary Credential (2042)30

Early Education Emphasis Certificate (3 additional courses)
EDMS 431 Child Study and Curriculum Development In Preschool and Kindergarten (3)
EDMS 437 Integrated Curriculum, Preschool Through Elementary(3)
EDEC 537 Authentic Assessment in Preschool and Primary Programs(3)

TOTAL UNITS 9

II. Master of Arts in Education with a concentration in Early Childhood Education

The MA degree program in education offers courses of graduate study to prepare candidates for specialized teaching and for curriculum and instructional leadership responsibilities in schools. The program, a minimum of 30 units, provides for areas of concentration in educational administration; curriculum, teaching, and learning; early childhood education; reading and language; and special education.

Students must maintain a 3.00 grade point average in all coursework in the approved master's degree program.

Refer to the Graduate Degrees section for more information, page 35.

Prerequisites for the MA Program

1. A bachelor's degree from an accredited institution.
2. A cumulative upper-division and graduate grade point average of at least 3.00 and a grade point average of at least 3.00 for previous work in education.

Procedures for Applying to the MA Program

  1. Apply to the University as a graduate student.
  2. Apply to the School of Education.
  3. Submit the following:
    1. A professional-goals statement.
    2. One set of official transcripts.
    3. One photocopy of a valid basic teaching credential (except where otherwise noted).
    4. Two letters of reference attesting to academic potential and professional promise (except where otherwise noted).

Requirements for Advancement to Candidacy

  1. Completion of MA core courses EDUC 570 and 571, and of MA concentrations.
  2. Presentation and approval of program portfolio.
  3. Filing of Advancement to Candidacy form with School of Education graduate coordinator.

The Program Portfolio

Throughout their entire MA course of study, graduate students work on a reflective program portfolio. The portfolio addresses the following questions: Who am I in the context of the profession of education at this time in my personal and professional history and in the cultural context in which I live and learn? Under what conditions do I feel respected and engaged as a learner? What ideas have shaped and will impact my practice and my beliefs about education? What ideas, issues, and topics interest me as possible areas for in-depth inquiry? Students will construct and review their program portfolios as an ongoing requirement for the graduate core courses. Presentation of the program portfolio is required for advancement to candidacy.

Requirements for the MA Degree in Education

Graduate students must complete all requirements as established by the School of Education, the SSU Graduate Studies Council and the University, to include:

  1. Completion of an approved program consisting of a minimum of 30 units of upper-division and 500-level courses, as follows:
    1. At least one-half of the units in 500-level courses.
    2. Not more than 9 semester units of transfer and/or extension credit.
    3. Filing of an Advancement to Candidacy form that verifies approval of the program portfolio, verifies writing proficiency, and describes the culminating project.
  2. Completion and final approval of EDUC 598 (MA Thesis or Project Seminar) and completion and final approval of a 1) thesis, curriculum project, or creative project; 2) Cognate Project; or 3) Individualized Examination.

All requirements listed above must be completed within seven years (14 semesters) of the initiation of graduate study.

Early Childhood Education

The early childhood education concentration is designed to prepare teachers to work in public school, private and community-based programs that serve children from infancy through third grade (age birth to age 8), and to take leadership roles in the field of early childhood education. Required coursework focuses on cross-cultural issues in working with families and young children and advanced study of cognitive, language, social, emotional, and moral development. Improvement of classroom curriculum and assessment from infancy through the primary grades is another emphasis of the program. Candidates need not possess a teaching credential; they may prepare for leadership and advocacy positions in a variety of settings; however, a basic course in child development is a prerequisite to admission to the program. Details are available from the early childhood education program advisor.

Program Coursework: 30 units

Required Core Courses in Concentration (6 units):
EDEC 505 Action Research in Preschool and Elementary Classrooms (3) and either
EDEC 538 The Development of Language and Thinking, Infancy through Middle Childhood (3) or
EDEC 539 Advanced Seminar in Early Childhood Education: Research on Quality and Design (3)

At least four of the following courses (12 units):
EDEC 530* Teaching to Diversity (3)
EDEC 531 The Role of Play in Development and Learning (3)
EDEC 532 Social-Moral Development in Childhood (3)
EDEC 534* First and Second Language Curriculum in Preschool and Primary (3)
EDEC 535 Leadership and Advocacy for Children and Families (3)
EDEC 537* Authentic Assessment in Preschool and Primary Programs (3)
EDEC 593 Cross-cultural Approaches to Early Childhood Education (3)

Education Core Courses (12 units):
EDUC 570 The Reflective Educator (3)
EDUC 571 Research Paradigms in Education (3)
EDUC 598 Developing a Thesis/Project (3)
EDUC 599 Supervised Research for Thesis/Project (3)
* May be applied to GRAD CLAD authorization

Supporting Coursework

Electives may include coursework in other academic areas. Please consult with a faculty advisor.

Pathways to Program Completion

The MA program of study requires 30-36 semester units of coursework, depending on the MA in Education pathway a student selects. There are three pathways to program completion, including the thesis/project, cognate, and individualized examination. We encourage students to become knowledgeable about each of the pathways in order to pursue a program of study that meets their professional goals within their preferred style of learning.

In all three pathways, graduate students take 18 units in the program area of concentration and at least 6 units (EDUC 570 and 571) of MA core courses. All MA students work with a three-member committee, and most closely with the committee chair, to complete a culminating activity which is presented to the committee in a public forum. In addition to these points in common, there are distinct differences among the three pathways to program completion, as described below.

Thesis/Project

The thesis/project pathway is a 30-unit course of study, including 18 units in students' program area of concentration and 12 units of core courses (EDUC 570, 571, 598, and 599). In order to prepare for the thesis/project, students must take Education 598 (Developing a Thesis/Project) and 599 (Supervised Study for the Thesis/Project) as their final two courses in the MA program.

The thesis is a written product of a systematic study of a significant problem in education. The project is a written document describing a significant undertaking appropriate to education. The thesis/project option requires an extensive write-up, including an in-depth literature review. Students must also present their thesis/project to their three-member committee in a public forum. Examples of a thesis investigation include process/product research, correlational study, action research, ethnographic study, historical study, or theoretical study. Examples of a project include curriculum design, professional development for educators, program design, performance piece, or creative project.

Cognate

The cognate pathway is a 36-unit course of study, including 18 units in the students' program area of concentration, 9 units of core courses (EDUC 570, 571, and 572), and a 9-unit cognate course of study. The cognate course of study is a group of courses which students choose in consultation with a faculty advisor and/or committee chair, and that allows students to examine areas of interest related to their MA concentration. In order to work with their three-member committee on the cognate project, students must take Education 572 (Supervised Study for the Cognate Project) as their final course in the MA program.

The cognate project (e.g., portfolio, professional article, video, Web site, field-based product) is a significant undertaking through which students connect their cognate course of study with the MA core courses, program concentration, and/or work in the field. The project may address, for example, implications of the cognate course of study for the classroom, reflections on new teaching practices, response to scholarly research, or educational theory. A written reflection must be included in the project. Students must present the completed project to their three-member committee in a public forum.

Individualized Examination

The individualized examination pathway is a 33-unit course of study, including 18 units in the students' program area of concentration, 9 units of core courses (EDUC 570, 571, and 573), and 6 units of elective courses. For the electives, students, in consultation with their faculty advisor and/or committee chair, choose courses which allow them to examine areas of interest related to the MA concentration and to focus on the examination area(s) of study that they have chosen. In order to work with their three-member committee as they prepare for the examination, students must take Education 573 (Supervised Study for the Individualized Examination) as their final course in the MA program.

The individualized examination addresses areas of study identified by the student in consultation with the student's examination committee. The exam is written by the student's committee (a chair plus two other members) and consists of four questions related to the student's area(s) of study, including one question submitted in advance to the committee by the student. When the student is ready to take the examination, he/she receives the questions from the chair and has 72 hours to complete the written examination and to return it to the chair. Within two weeks of completing the examination, the student must meet with the committee for an oral examination in which the committee asks follow-up questions for clarification and elaboration.

The Program Portfolio

In order to advance to candidacy, all students must complete a program portfolio and present it to their committee. In most cases, this presentation occurs at the same meeting in which the student presents a proposal for the culminating activity. The program portfolio contains artifacts (papers, projects, etc.) produced by the student throughout the MA program which demonstrate the student's proficiency and growth in the areas listed below. The portfolio should be reflective in nature and should show personal, professional, and intellectual growth. It should also demonstrate how the student's MA program has prepared the student to undertake the culminating activity (thesis/project, cognate project, or individual examination).

In the program portfolio, students are expected to demonstrate:

  • Personal, intellectual, and professional growth over the course of the MA program
  • Written language proficiency
  • Breadth and depth of knowledge in educational research
  • Breadth and depth of knowledge in the program area of concentration
  • Evidence of planning toward the completion of the culminating activity (thesis/project, cognate project, or individualized examination)

Requirements for Advancement to Candidacy

  1. Completion of MA core courses EDUC 570 and 571, and of MA area of concentration courses
  2. Presentation and approval of program portfolio
  3. Presentation of culminating activity proposal
  4. Filing of Advancement to Candidacy form with School of Education Director of Graduate Studies

Early Childhood Courses (EDEC)

505 Action Research in Preschool and Elementary Classrooms (3) Alternate years

Techniques for conducting ethnographic action research in preschool and elementary settings. Theory and research relating to children's construction of friendships and peer group processes are discussed. Special emphasis is placed on inclusion and exclusion in classroom peer cultures. Grade only.

530 Teaching to Diversity (3) Spring

Since most aspects of education are influenced by culture, this course is designed to analyze education as a cultural process. The multicultural nature of today's society in California and the United States makes it imperative for educators to include multiple approaches to teaching and learning. This course reviews theoretical and practical perspectives of cultural diversity, cross-cultural contact, and culturally sensitive pedagogy, particularly for limited English proficient students. Grade only. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

531 The Role of Play in Development and Learning (3) Alternate years

Stages of development of play from infancy through adulthood from the perspectives of Piaget, Freud, Erickson, Mead, and Czskizenmihayhli are addressed as well as anthropological perspectives on play and culture, play's relationship to learning in academic disciplines such as language and literacy, and logical-mathematical thinking and the arts. Topics include: the effects of technology (television, computers, and video) on children's play, gender development and play, and play as a tool for developmentally and culturally sensitive curriculum and assessment. Grade only. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

532 Social-Moral Development in Childhood (3) Alternate years

Theories and research addressing social-moral development in early childhood, including cultural value differences are discussed. Stages of perspectivism, friendship, and moral understanding from infancy through middle childhood are considered as well as research on the development of prosocial behavior through focused curriculum. Theories and research addressing gender identity and gender role socialization, research and theories applicable to resiliency for at-risk children, and working with parents to help them understand children's social-moral development are topics included. Grade only. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

534 First and Second Language Curriculum in Preschool and Primary (3) / Spring

Students explore the nature and development of developmentally and culturally appropriate practice in schools with diverse populations, including the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in first and second languages. From observations of children's language, play, and projects in a variety of settings, students will explore the socio- and psycholinguistic underpinnings of communicative competence, emerging literacy and conceptual development in both home and second languages. Strategies for linking children's home and school experiences with holistic, interactive, and integrated curriculum will be emphasized as well as a variety of strategies for Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English (SDAIE). Grade only.

535 Leadership and Advocacy for Children and Families (3) / Alternate years

A critical examination of current policy issues related to the inclusion of families in schools, including bilingual education, family literacy programs, Head Start and Even Start, and coordinated services for families and children from diverse cultural, linguistic and socioeconomic backgrounds within school settings. Each student will propose and complete a field-based project touching upon one or more of these areas of professional expertise as part of the development of a leadership and advocacy portfolio for the course. Applicable to the Child Development Permit.

537 Authentic Assessment in Preschool and Primary Programs (3)

Focus is on child study, clinical interviews, ethnography, portfolio development, and other strategies designed to assess young children in both their first and second languages. The integration of curriculum and assessment in classrooms that meet the needs of children and families from diverse cultural, linguistic, and economic background is stressed. Grade only.

538 The Development of Language and Thinking: Infancy through Middle Childhood (3)

This course addresses the development of children from birth through middle childhood with emphasis on the relationships between language development and cognitive development. Current research and theories of cognitive, social, and emotional development as related to language development in home and at school and to the development of both first and second languages are studied. The development of oral, written, and spoken languages in school and care settings are highlighted. Major theorists such as Piaget, Erickson, Bruner, Vygotsky, Mead, and others who address the development of children's representational thinking, language, and cross-cultural and family influences on development and learning are discussed. Current research on brain development in the first five years of life is also included and discussed from a critical perspective related to practice. Grade only. Prerequisite: permission of instructor or Master of Arts in Education program.

539 Advanced Seminar in Early Childhood Education: Research on Quality and Design (3) Alternate years

Critical analysis and evaluation of qualitative and quantitative research in Early Childhood Education, and implications for curriculum in schools and care programs serving children infancy through the primary grades of elementary school are addressed. Research and policy studies addressing quality indicators in programs for young children across all areas of curriculum are included, as well as factors such as the physical environment, schedules, and teachers' professional development. The focus is on integration of research findings and methodologies to improve the quality of programs designed to serve young children and their families. Grade only. Prerequisite: permission of instructor or acceptance to Master of Arts in Education program.

593 Cross-cultural Approaches to Early Childhood Education (3) Alternate years

Historical and philosophical perspectives on the care and education of young children from early centuries to the present day, including models from Europe, China, Japan, Africa, and Latin America. Topics include: the roles of the child and the teacher; design of curriculum and environments for learning; and approaches to diversity in classrooms and communities. Grade only.

Education Courses (EDUC)

490 Selected Topics in Education (1-4) / Fall, Spring

A course designed according to the interest of a particular faculty member, providing opportunities for diversification in content and reading. Grade only.

495 Special Studies (1-4) / Fall, Spring

Independent study designed in consultation with an instructor. Grade only. Prerequisites: successful completion of at least two courses in the School of Education, and submission of a completed SSU special studies form with required approvals during the first week of classes.

Graduate Courses

500 Advanced Selected Topics in Education (1-4) Fall, Spring

A graduate course designed according to the interest of a particular faculty member, providing opportunities for diversification in content and reading. Grade only.

570 The Reflective Educator (3) / Fall, Spring

This is the first in a series of three graduate core courses in the School of Education. Students will take this course at the beginning of the MA program. The focus of this course is on philosophical, historical, social, and psychological perspectives in education. Students will examine these perspectives while being encouraged to examine and reflect upon their own professional practices in education. In this course, students will begin to construct a reflective program portfolio that they will continue to modify throughout their MA program. The portfolio is intended to be cumulative throughout the graduate core courses. Grade only. Prerequisite: admission to MA in education program.

571 Research Paradigms in Education (3) Fall, Spring

This is the second in the series of three graduate core courses, and is designed to be taken midway in the master of arts degree program. This course focuses on students as critical consumers of research, and includes among its goals the development of skills in the analysis and critique of educational research. The course addresses research and field needs of practicing educators as opposed to the needs of professional researchers and serves to acquaint students with basic principles and techniques of educational research. It also provides students with an opportunity to integrate knowledge of these principles through analyses of action research projects that may serve as the foundation for the culminating Master of Arts degree project. Grade only. Prerequisite: EDUC 570.

572 Supervised Study for the Cognate Project (3) Fall, Spring

This supervised independent study provides students with guidance in the completion of their cognate project. Under the direction of the committee chair, and in consultation with all committee members, students will complete (1) a project that synthesizes their cognate coursework and connects it to their MA Program Concentration, and (2) a scholarly reflection which accompanies the project. Following completion of the project, students will participate in a formal presentation of their work to faculty and colleagues. Cr/NC. Prerequisite: advancement to candidacy.

573 Supervised Study for the Individualized Examination (3) / Fall, Spring

This supervised independent study provides students with guidance in preparing for the individualized examination. Under the direction of the committee chair, and in consultation with all committee members, each student will determine the areas of study to be addressed in the examination, choose relevant readings, and conduct a concentrated study of those areas to prepare for the exam. Following completion of the written exam, students will take an oral exam in which committee members ask follow-up questions to the written responses. Cr/NC. Prerequisite: advancement to candidacy.

578 Project Continuation (1-3) / Fall, Spring

Designed for students working on their thesis or master's project but who have otherwise completed all graduate coursework toward their degree. This course cannot be applied toward the minimum number of units needed for completion of the master's degree. Prerequisite: permission of the graduate coordinator. Cr/NC only.

595 Special Studies (1-4) / Fall, Spring

Independent study designed in consultation with an instructor. Grade only. Prerequisite: Students must complete the standard SSU form and secure the required approvals during the first week of classes.

598 Developing a Thesis/Project (3)

This is the final course in the graduate core courses in education. This course develops students' abilities to carry out a thesis or project and provides basic information for planning and implementing the Master of Arts degree proposal. The main goal is to provide students with knowledge to begin their thesis or project. Time is provided students to assess progress in the program and to complete portfolio development. Grade only. Prerequisite: completion of all MA coursework or taken in final semester of MA coursework.

599 Supervised Research for Thesis/Project (3)

Supervised Research provides students with guidance in the completion of their research project. Under the direction of the committee chair, and in consultation with all committee members, students will complete the thesis or project that was developed in EDUC 598 Developing a Thesis/Project. Following completion of the research project, students will participate in a formal presentation of their work to faculty and colleagues. Cr/NC. Prerequisite: completion of EDUC 598. Advancement to candidacy approved.

V. Reading and Language Programs

The Department of Literacy Studies and Elementary Education offers three graduate programs to support in-depth exploration of language development and literacy learning and teaching. The programs feature hands-on experiences that are immediately applicable to your classroom. Many of our students earn state licenses and a master’s degree simultaneously. Please explore our site at www.sonoma.edu/lsee/reading/index.html

The Department of Literacy Studies and Elementary Education is dedicated to excellence in the preparation of teachers and the on-going professional development of practicing teachers in the areas of bilingual education, and reading and language arts education. Our programs are based on sound educational practice, current research knowledge, sensitivity to the needs of P-12 education, appreciation for diversity, and respect for all learners.

MA in education programs are designed with both full-time and part-time students in mind. Some master's degree programs may be taken concurrently with advanced credential programs.

Note: Program requirements change periodically, and current information may not be available in this catalog. For more detailed information on credentials and other education programs, please see the University's special bulletins, the University Web site, and the School of Education's current program brochures and policy statements.

Credentials Office

The Credentials Office serves as the admissions and records center for all programs offered in the School of Education and is responsible for the recommendation of teaching and service credentials. Credentials analysts and staff are available for providing application information and credential information to prospective students, continuing students, out of state teachers/administrators, University constituents and the University service area in general.

Reading Programs Offered in the Department of Literacy Studies and Elementary Education

The Department of Literacy Studies and Elementary Education offers graduate programs in reading and language including the master's degree with an emphasis in Reading and Language, the Reading Certificate, an advanced credential, and the Reading and Language Arts Specialist Credential. Many students earn state licenses and a master’s degree simultaneously. These programs may be taken individually or candidates may complete the M.S. degree program and the Reading Certificate/Reading and Language Arts Specialist Credential simultaneously.

I. Master of Arts in Education with a concentration in Reading and Language

The MA degree program in education offers courses of graduate study to prepare candidates for specialized teaching and for curriculum and instructional leadership responsibilities in the schools. The program, a minimum of 30 units, provides for areas of concentration in educational administration; curriculum, teaching and learning; early childhood education; reading and language; and special education.

Students must maintain a 3.00 grade point average in all coursework in the approved master's degree program as well as all coursework taken subsequent to admission in conditionally classified standing.

For more information, refer to the section on Graduate Degrees on page 35. The graduate director is John Kornfeld. The Reading and Language program advisor is Paul Crowley.

Prerequisites for the Reading and Language Graduate Programs (MA; Reading Certificate; Reading and Language Arts Specialist Credential)

  • A bachelor's degree from an accredited institution.
  • A cumulative upper-division and graduate grade point average of at least 3.00 and a grade point average of at least 3.00 for previous work in education.

Procedures for Applying to the Graduate Program

  • Apply to the University as a graduate student.
  • Apply to the School of Education.
  • Submit the following:
  • A professional-goals statement.
  • One set of official transcripts.
  • One photocopy of a valid basic teaching credential (except where otherwise noted).
  • Two letters of reference attesting to academic potential and professional promise (except where otherwise noted).

Requirements for MA Advancement to Candidacy

  • Completion of MA core courses EDUC 570 and 571, and of MA concentrations.
  • Presentation and approval of program portfolio.
  • Filing of Advancement to Candidacy form with School of Education graduate director.

Requirements for the MA Degree in Education

Graduate students must complete all requirements as established by the School of Education, the SSU Graduate Studies Council and the University, to include:
  • Completion of an approved program consisting of a minimum of 30 units of upper-division and 500-level courses, as follows:
  • at least one-half of the units in 500-level courses.
  • not more than 9 semester units of transfer and/or extension credit.
  • filing of an Advancement for Candidacy form that verifies approval of the program portfolio, verifies writing proficiency, and describes the culminating project.

Completion and final approval of EDUC 572, 573 or 598/599 and completion and final approval of a cognate, individualized examination, thesis, curriculum project, or creative project.

All MA requirements listed above must be completed within seven years (14 semesters) of the initiation of graduate study.

The MA Program Portfolio

Throughout their entire MA course of study, graduate students work on a reflective program portfolio. The portfolio addresses the following questions: Who am I in the context of the profession of education at this time in my personal and professional history and in the cultural context in which I live and learn? Under what conditions do I feel respected and engaged as a learner? What ideas have shaped and will impact my practice and my beliefs about education? What ideas, issues, and topics interest me as possible areas for in-depth inquiry? Students will construct and review their program portfolios as an ongoing requirement for the graduate core courses. Presentation of the program portfolio is required for advancement to candidacy.

Reading and Language Master's Degree Program

The reading and language concentration is designed to prepare teachers for specialized teaching of reading and language arts and for curriculum and instructional leadership in the field of language and literacy. Required coursework focuses on the nature of literacy development and the improvement of classroom curriculum and methods that emphasize the relationship of reading to other language and concept learning.

Program Coursework: 30 - 36 units

Reading/Language Core Courses (9 units)

 EDRL 507 Research in Language and Literacy  3
 EDRL 521A Language Development in First and Second Languages  3
 EDRL 522 Assessment and Teaching in Reading and Language Arts  3

Education Core Courses (9-12 units)

 EDUC 570 The Reflective Educator  3
 EDUC 571 Research Paradigms in Education  3

Thesis Path (30-unit course of study, including 18 units in the student's program area, 12 units of core courses):
EDUC 598 Developing a Thesis/Project (3)
EDUC 599 Supervised Research for Thesis/Project (3)

Cognate Path (36-unit course of study, including 18 units in the student's program area, 9 units of core courses, and a 9-unit cognate course of study):
EDUC 572 Supervised Study for the Cognate Project (3)

Individualized Exam Path (33-unit course of study, including 18 units in the student's program area, 9 units of core courses, and 6 units of elective courses):
EDUC 573 Supervised Study for the Individualized Examination (3)

Supporting Coursework (9 units)

The MA in reading/language education allows you to take 9 elective units (three courses, typically) in the reading/language project or in other approved areas, such as bilingual education, curriculum, ESL, and early childhood education.

If you have attended the California Reading and Literature Project Summer Institute or if you would be interested in doing so after enrolling in the program, 3 credit units can be applied to the MA in reading/language.

Students who wish to pursue a Reading Certificate and Reading/Language Arts Specialist Credential, and an MA degree in reading and language education may complete the programs concurrently.

Pathways to Program Completion

The MA program of study requires 30-36 semester units of coursework, depending on the MA in Education pathway a student selects. There are three pathways to program completion, including the thesis/project, cognate, and individualized examination. We encourage students to become knowledgeable about each of the pathways in order to pursue a program of study that meets their professional goals within their preferred style of learning.

In all three pathways, graduate students take 18 units in the program area of concentration and at least 6 units (EDUC 570 and 571) of MA core courses. All MA students work with a three-member committee, and most closely with the committee chair, to complete a culminating activity which is presented to the committee in a public forum. In addition to these points in common, there are distinct differences among the three pathways to program completion, as described below.

Thesis/Project

The thesis/project pathway is a 30-unit course of study, including 18 units in students' program area of concentration and 12 units of core courses (EDUC 570, 571, 598, and 599). In order to prepare for the thesis/project, students must take Education 598 (Developing a Thesis/Project) and 599 (Supervised Study for the Thesis/Project) as their final two courses in the MA program.

The thesis is a written product of a systematic study of a significant problem in education. The project is a written document describing a significant undertaking appropriate to education. The thesis/project option requires an extensive write-up, including an in-depth literature review. Students must also present their thesis/project to their three-member committee in a public forum. Examples of a thesis investigation include process/product research, correlational study, action research, ethnographic study, historical study, or theoretical study. Examples of a project include curriculum design, professional development for educators, program design, performance piece, or creative project.

Cognate

The cognate pathway is a 36-unit course of study, including 18 units in the students' program area of concentration, 9 units of core courses (EDUC 570, 571, and 572), and a 9-unit cognate course of study. The cognate course of study is a group of courses which students choose in consultation with a faculty advisor and/or committee chair, and that allows students to examine areas of interest related to their MA concentration. In order to work with their three-member committee on the cognate project, students must take Education 572 (Supervised Study for the Cognate Project) as their final course in the MA program.

The cognate project (e.g., portfolio, professional article, video, Web site, field-based product) is a significant undertaking through which students connect their cognate course of study with the M.A. core courses, program concentration, and/or work in the field. The project may address, for example, implications of the cognate course of study for the classroom, reflections on new teaching practices, response to scholarly research, or educational theory. A written reflection must be included in the project. Students must present the completed project to their three-member committee in a public forum.

Individualized Examination

The individualized examination pathway is a 33-unit course of study, including 18 units in the students' program area of concentration, 9 units of core courses (EDUC 570, 571, and 573), and 6 units of elective courses. For the electives, students, in consultation with their faculty advisor and/or committee chair, choose courses which allow them to examine areas of interest related to the MA concentration and to focus on the examination area(s) of study that they have chosen. In order to work with their three-member committee as they prepare for the examination, students must take Education 573 (Supervised Study for the Individualized Examination) as their final course in the MA program.

The individualized examination addresses areas of study identified by the student in consultation with the student's examination committee. The exam is written by the student's committee (a chair plus two other members) and consists of four questions related to the student's area(s) of study, including one question submitted in advance to the committee by the student. When the student is ready to take the examination, he/she receives the questions from the chair and has 72 hours to complete the written examination and to return it to the chair. Within two weeks of completing the examination, the student must meet with the committee for an oral examination in which the committee asks follow-up questions for clarification and elaboration.

III. Reading Certificate Program

The Reading Certificate prepares individuals to take a leadership role at the school site and emphasizes work with students who experience difficulties with reading. Reading Certificate teachers assist and support other classroom teachers, assess student progress, and monitor student achievement while providing instruction and intervention. They also play a consultative role in materials and program selection at the district and may take leadership responsibility within the more limited realm of the school site. The Certificate is the first part of a continuum of services to students and teachers in the area of reading and language arts. Teachers completing the Reading Certificate Program are encouraged to continue to earn the Reading and Language Arts Specialist Credential (currently under review by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing).

Program Prerequisite
a basic teaching credential is required for admission

Reading Certificate Prerequisite
three years teaching experience is required for awarding of Reading Certificate

Block One: Developing a Personal Model of Literacy
Spring
Integrated investigation of Literacy Research/Theories/Beliefs/Practices aimed at developing a working understanding and reflective stance for each of these themes through in-depth case studies of English language learners. The breadth and depth of the themes ensure that candidates examine and understand the nature of fluent reading and comprehension, assessment approaches, planning and delivery of reading intervention and instruction, and best practices in assisting classroom teachers of English only and English language learners. Focused field experiences and assessment that lead to purposeful reading instruction permeate this block.

 EDRL 521A Language Development in First and Second Languages 3
 EDRL 522 Assessment and Teaching in Reading and Language Arts 3

On-Campus Reading and Writing Clinic
Summer
Public school students attend SSU for reading improvement and enrichment in a supervised clinical setting. Certificate candidates assess and teach these students, deepening knowledge of reading and language arts assessment, intervention, and instructional strategies, in collaboration with, and under the supervision of, clinical faculty, university faculty, and Reading and Language Arts Specialist candidates.

 EDRL 527A Clinical Field Experience in Reading and Language Arts  3

Block Two: Developing a Professional Model of Literacy
Fall
Investigation of Research/Theories/Beliefs/Practices in teaching reading and writing, designed to produce a professional knowledge base for each of these themes. Candidates develop a comprehensive set of strategies for promoting fluent reading and comprehension, planning and delivery of literature-based reading curriculum, and assessment-based intervention and instruction. Candidates are prepared for literacy and language arts leadership roles at the school level.

 EDRL 521B Reading and Language Arts in First and Second Languages  3
 EDRL 524 Literature and Literacy   3

IV. Reading and Language Arts Specialist Credential

All teacher preparation institutions in California were provided with new program standards for the Reading and Language Arts Specialist Credential by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing. The newly designed SSU Specialist program is currently under review by the Commission. Contact Paul Crowley, Reading and Language Program Advisor, for information regarding the status of the program's approval.

The Reading and Language Arts Specialist Credential prepares candidates to work with students in various settings and to perform multiple roles, including assisting and supporting classroom teachers in the appropriate assessment and instruction of reading and writing for all students across all grade levels. The specialist may also:

  • provide direct services to students to help them attain independence in reading and writing, including comprehension and critical thinking skills.
  • do demonstration teaching and curriculum planning for groups and individuals.
  • organize and manage language arts programs at the district or school level.
  • assess teaching strategies to assist teachers in creating a literacy learning environment.
  • provide leadership in materials, textbook, and program selection at the district or school level.
  • plan and conduct inservice professional development activities for teachers, administrators, school board members, parents, and members of the community at the district or school level.

Credential prerequisite requirements: All Reading Certificate courses including certificate prerequisites

Block Three: Developing Research-Based Literacy Theory
Spring
Continued investigation of Research/Theories/Beliefs/Practices aimed at developing thorough understanding and a reflective stance for each theme. Candidates examine and critique research-based curricular practices and assessment approaches in professional literature and field settings. Topics include: fluent reading; comprehension, planning, and delivery of literacy curriculum; intervention strategies; best practices in assisting classroom teachers; and assessment that leads to purposeful reading and writing instruction.
EDRL 523 Curriculum Development in Language and Literacy (3)
EDRL 529 Evaluation in Reading and Language Arts Programs (3)

On-Campus Reading and Writing Clinic
Summer
Public school students attend SSU for reading improvement and enrichment in a supervised clinical setting. Specialist Credential candidates supervise Certificate candidates in assessment and intervention strategies with the students with diverse reading abilities and backgrounds. Candidates also demonstrate effective teaching of struggling readers, conduct clinical conferences and review clinical reports, and monitor overall clinical experiences.
EDRL 527B Advanced Clinical Field Experience in Reading and Language Arts 3

Block Four: Developing Professional Literacy Models
Fall
Advanced and intensive investigation of Research/Theory/Beliefs/Practice. All coursework and field experiences are aimed at articulating a professional knowledge base for each theme. Candidates critique research into reading and writing for diverse student populations, conduct their own literacy studies, and hone their leadership skills for assisting classroom teachers and other educational professionals with literacy education through focused field experiences.

 EDRL 507 Research in Language and Literacy  3
 EDRL 525 Leadership and Policy in Literacy Programs  3

Multiple Subject Courses (EDMS)

EDMS 411 Second Language Pedagogy (3) fall, spring

With the increasing numbers of children from different linguistic and cultural backgrounds in schools, preparing to teach and foster development of language and literacy among all children in the classroom is a major responsibility. The course reviews first- and second-language acquisition and major second-language teaching methodologies in relation to language development in school settings. The purpose of this course is to help students discover a diversity of approaches, methods, materials, and media they can use to help all students in our culturally and linguistically diverse classrooms become active, engaged, and independent learners. Attention is given to the integrated development of all language skills within the context of the elementary school curriculum. Grade only.

EDMS 420 Child Development in Family, School and Community (3) fall, spring

This course explores the physical, cognitive, social, emotional, moral, and language development of children from birth through adolescence. Major theories of child development are studied and applications and critiques of theories as they relate to children from a variety of cultural and family backgrounds are discussed. Children's experiences in families, schools, and communities are studied as they relate to children's views of the world, including health and discipline practices. The impact of family and child rearing beliefs, gender issues, and language development are discussed as they relate to developmentally-based practices in educational settings. Students also discuss effective school-family communication practices for a diverse society, and community resources available to support families, including those that address issues of poverty and violence and the effects of these on children and their families. Class sessions will include whole group and small group discussions, multiple opportunities to work collaboratively with classmates, field trips and student presentations. Grade only.

EDMS 463 Teaching Reading & Language Arts to Beginning Learners (3) fall, spring

Philosophy, goals and pedagogy in reading and language arts in grades K-3. Candidates examine early literacy development and teaching/learning processes in order to extend their knowledge and competencies to teach reading, writing, and other sign systems to students of diverse backgrounds. Candidates learn to assess and build upon the oral and written language strengths children bring to school, with attention to print awareness, control of language (semantics, syntax, grapho-phonemics, pragmatics), functions of oral and written language, literature and text interpretation, language conventions, writing strategies, writing applications, and non-written communication. Literacy is viewed as a dynamic and multidimensional human process that enables individuals to express, communicate, and reflect on their experiences, hopes, and dreams. Reading and writing involve constructive strategies of composition and comprehension, situated in particular contexts and carried out for personal and social purposes. Language and literacy vary according to regional, historical, social, cultural, political, and economic influences; these and other factors must be interrogated and taken into account in instructional decisions. All children learn language, learn about language, and learn through language by using language in natural contexts. Grade only.

EDMS 464 Teaching Reading to Struggling Learners and Older Students (2) fall, spring

Philosophy, goals, and pedagogy in reading and language arts in grades 3-8. Designed for student teachers to refine and extend their knowledge of language arts instruction, reading and writing, and other literacies, this course builds on and extends candidate experience and knowledge developed in EDMS 463 Teaching Reading and Language Arts in the Elementary School to Younger Students. Candidates examine literacy development and teaching/learning processes in order to design, teach, and assess literacy lessons in their classrooms and promote literacy with older readers, struggling readers, and second language learners using assessment data, state content standards, and a range of materials. In addition to an emphasis on reading and writing across the curriculum, particular focus is given to the arts as a way of knowing and expression, including dance, drama, visual and performing arts. Candidates develop understandings of transmediation, the process of recasting meaning through literature and the arts. In addition, candidates complete field assignments that provide opportunities for first-hand knowledge and application of classroom literacy practices and course concepts derived from foundational literacy sound research. In addition, the role of inquiry, reading frameworks, literacy-rich environments, graphic aids, vocabulary development and assessment strategies will be examined. Grade only. Prerequisite: EDMS 463

EDMS 464B Teaching Reading to Struggling Learners and Older Students (2) fall
Taught and conducted entirely in Spanish

Philosophy, goals, and pedagogy in reading and language arts in grades 3-8. Designed for student teachers to refine and extend their knowledge of language arts instruction, reading and writing, and other literacies, this course builds on and extends candidate experience and knowledge developed in EDMS 463 Teaching Reading and Language Arts in the Elementary School to Younger Students. Candidates examine literacy development and teaching/learning processes in order to design, teach, and assess literacy lessons in their classrooms and promote literacy with older readers, struggling readers, and second language learners using assessment data, state content standards, and a range of materials. In addition to an emphasis on reading and writing across the curriculum, particular focus is given to the arts as a way of knowing and expression, including dance, drama, visual and performing arts. Candidates develop understandings of transmediation, the process of recasting meaning through literature and the arts. In addition, candidates complete field assignments that provide opportunities for firsthand knowledge and application of classroom literacy practices and course concepts derived from foundational literacy sound research. In addition, the role of inquiry, reading frameworks, literacy-rich environments, graphic aids, vocabulary development and assessment strategies will be examined. Grade only. Prerequisite: EDMS 463

EDMS 470 Multicultural Pedagogy (3)

Examination of cultural, ethnic, racial, linguistic, gender, family structure and individual diversity in the classroom, and the root causes of current classroom and school problems. The course includes an introduction to educational ethnography, and provides a basis for understanding the relationship of educational research and classroom teaching in terms of culture, teaching, and learning. Alternative methods and materials integrating social studies with other elementary school subjects are examined and evaluated; teacher candidates learn how to develop their own program of study in the social sciences. Students use techniques of ethnographic methods to observe and analyze classrooms during the observational field placement of the class (30 hours) during the last half of the semester. Grade only.

EDMS 471 Teaching Social Science in a Multicultural Society (2) fall, spring

Alternative methods and materials integrating social studies with other school subjects are examined and evaluated; teacher candidates learn to develop their own program of study in the social sciences. Grade only.

EDMS 474 Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School (3) fall, spring

Goals, principles, methods, and materials for teaching mathematics in elementary schools. This course aims to increase students' own confidence and appreciation of elementary mathematics, to broaden and deepen their understanding of current trends and issues in mathematics education, and to help them develop techniques and activities for teaching mathematics effectively to children. Coursework includes many teaching and learning activities, as well as reading and discussion. Grade only. Open to students in the BCLAD Credential program; students must enroll concurrently in EDUC 476.

EDMS 475 Teaching Science in the Elementary School (3) fall, spring

Philosophy, goals, and techniques of elementary science teaching. Emphasis is on theories and methods of teaching for conceptual understanding, development of science process skills, and development of positive attitudes toward science and learning. Major concepts of science are reviewed, with emphasis on representing them in ways that are effective with elementary students. Active, hands-on methods of teaching are presented throughout the course. Grade only.

EDMS 476F Participant Observation (3 units) fall, spring

Candidates are in public school classrooms for a minimum of 12 contact hours and two planning hours for 15 weeks. During candidates' fieldwork they will observe the daily classroom routines, activities, and curriculum materials and instruction in place for each subject area. Candidates plan/implement curriculum that is sensitive to students’ language needs and is open to considerations of diversity, as well as, plan for small and whole group instruction. Candidates may be paired with a student teacher. Prerequisites: Pass CBEST, have fingerprints on file in credentials office, negative TB test.

EDMS 476S Participant Observation Seminar (1 unit)
Prerequisites: Enrolled in EDMS 476F Cr/NC only.

EDMS 480B Participant Observation Seminar (1 unit)

Taught and conducted entirely in Spanish

Focuses on various ways of organizing disciplined-based knowledge that give elementary students a coherent educational experience. Teacher candidates are encouraged to use lessons, materials, and unit plans written for this class in their concurrent student teaching experience. Grade only. Prerequisite: Enrolled in EDMS 476 F Cr/NC only.

Phase II

EDMS 482F Student Teaching and Seminar (10)

Candidates spend four and one half days per week in an elementary classroom for 15 weeks. Most will be paired with a 476 participant observer. During two weeks of this experience, candidates teach and are responsible for the entire curriculum and school day. Candidates meet with their supervisors every week. Prerequisites: admission to a Multiple Subject Program; completion of Phase I including EDUC 476 F&S. Cr/NC only.

EDMS 482S Student Seminar (2)

Concurrent with 482F

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